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SHOP RECOMMENDATIONS

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  • SHOP RECOMMENDATIONS

    I have just started into wood working and am building up my shop. HD has a promotion for 10% off when you turn in a old tool. I have a compound miter saw, router, and just bought a 3612 table saw. I have various portable hand tools and want to buy stationary tools. The projects that I will probably be doing are mostly cabinets for entertainment centers, computer workstations and maybe curio cabinets. What would be the recommendation for the next two or three power tools to buy? Drill press, planer, shaper, band saw, or the combo sander?

    [ 10-20-2002, 08:38 PM: Message edited by: norisk ]

  • #2
    Planer, bandsaw and spindle/belt sander are my next three choices...I had a drill press but rarely used it.
    Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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    • #3
      If you will be doing plywood cabinets for everything, then you are set. If you will be doing hardwood, you will need to join boards to make wider panels. Not only do the edges need to be square (jointer planer), but you will probably start with rougher lumber and mill it to thickness (thickness planer). After 25 years of struggling to build cabinets using a saw instead of a planer for the face frames, and having to live with lumber yard surfaces, I love having both the jointer and thickness planer.

      Everybody loves a bandsaw, so I bought one. I have decided to take a class to see why anyone would want one.

      With good saws, jointer, and planer, I rarely use a sander other than a good Random Orbital Sander that can progress from 60 to 220 grit. (I have others, including a bench-top disk/belt sander, but they are rarely used any more)

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      • #4
        I purchased a joiner and planer about 2 months ago and love having them in my shop. I don't know how I ever lived without them. I would recommend these tools next. It is easy to spend a lot of $$$ when you are talking stationary tools, but they do make a difference.

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        • #5
          Thanks to everyone for their advice. I was at HD today and talking to one of the employees. He said that I could turn in any broken tool. It did not have to be a power tool; a broken hammer, rake, etc. I found about ten "broken" tools and turned them in. For $1500. minus 10% I got the following Ridgid tools: drill press, band saw, wood lathe, and joiner planer. After I got home I started to think about the other tools. After getting this far I figure why not go for the whole hog. I will be going back tomorrow to get the sander and planer. I already have the TS3612. For a total investment of $2700 including the TS minus 10% on about $2200 I feel why not go for it and have almost a complete shop of Ridgid tools. I guess I could add the radial arm for another $600 to bring the total to $3300 but I don't see a need for it at this time. The only problem now is the tools and accessories that are needed. The next thing will be a dust collection system, clamps, blades, etc. Am having doubts about the lathe; am thinking about taking it back. Are there any accessories available for it. Can you use it to bore a hole? Am interested in making pool cues and repairing them. Any opinions or advice on this?

          [ 10-22-2002, 10:39 PM: Message edited by: norisk ]

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