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Comunication with RIDGID

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  • Comunication with RIDGID

    I sent an email to RIDGID asking about the life time warranty. It has almost been 30 days and I have not recived a response. If thats how they deal with there customers then I dont want any part of their product
    Dave Harris

  • #2
    Dave

    Who did you send it to? I hope it wasn't the webmaster. [img]smile.gif[/img]

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    • #3
      Dave,

      You can add Delta to your list of companies not to buy from. I sent them an email last November concerning a question I had about one of their scroll saws. To date, I've not received a reply to my question or even an acknowledgement that they will get back to me with an answer.

      The problem with emails is that you're at the mercy of whoever opens it. If they don't feel like dealing with your question on that particular day, it will get ignored. I've always had better luck utilizing toll free numbers and calling. Once you have them on the phone it pretty hard for them to get away from ya.

      Dave
      ================================================== ====
      All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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      • #4
        For better or worse, do not expect a company like Ridgid to enter into an extended debate about what a warranty "means" or translate it into any set of words other than those expensively and carefully drafted in the warranty itself.

        Warranty language is drafted by lawyers and given the clients with strict instructions that, if they want to take advantage of the lawyers' work, they must not engage in any dialog about what the warranty means or make any representations that could later be taken as amending, modifying or qualifying the warranty.

        I mean neither to defend nor challenge this practice, only to point out what it is. Warranty questions aren't going to get answered, for reasons that are rational and probably sound. And, for that reason, judging the overall responsiveness of a company by their responsiveness to questions that they have been advised not to respond to is not using a very good measuring stick.

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        • #5
          a lifetime warranty is a very debatable issue. depending on who you are talking with. its not easy to claim a lifetime warranty on a certain product, much less read 3 pages of that "small print".

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          • #6
            one year ago i mailed a letter to ridgid about where i could get more info on their products........i still look in my mailbox ......

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            • #7
              Originally posted by le bricoleur:
              one year ago i mailed a letter to ridgid about where i could get more info on their products........i still look in my mailbox ......
              You're not exactly the brightest bulb in the chandelier are you?

              *clique*
              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lorax:
                </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by le bricoleur:
                one year ago i mailed a letter to ridgid about where i could get more info on their products........i still look in my mailbox ......
                You're not exactly the brightest bulb in the chandelier are you?

                *clique*
                </font>[/QUOTE]ROTFLMAO
                ================================================== ====
                All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE]Originally posted by RGad:
                  For better or worse, do not expect a company like Ridgid to enter into an extended debate about what a warranty "means" or translate it into any set of words other than those expensively and carefully drafted in the warranty itself.

                  Warranty language is drafted by lawyers and given the clients with strict instructions that, if they want to take advantage of the lawyers' work, they must not engage in any dialog about what the warranty means or make any representations that could later be taken as amending, modifying or qualifying the warranty.

                  I mean neither to defend nor challenge this practice, only to point out what it is. Warranty questions aren't going to get answered, for reasons that are rational and probably sound. And, for that reason, judging the overall responsiveness of a company by their responsiveness to questions that they have been advised not to respond to is not using a very good measuring stick.
                  [/QUOTE


                  I have a problem with your last paragraph. In fact I think that the non-response may be legally prudent, but it must also be judged as negative by the consumer.

                  For example, let us say that a plumbing contractor gave you an estimate for some work on your home. It sounded like a reasonable price. He then presented you with a contract, some of which seemed unclear. Before signing you asked a few questions. His response was that his lawyer had advised him against discussing the terms of his contract. Would you hire that contractor?
                  the dog

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