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  • Cordless Tools

    What voltage cordless tools do you prefer to use?
    A) 9.6v
    B) 12.0v
    C) 14.4v
    D) 18v
    E) 24v
    Marcus Rinaldi<BR>Service Tech<BR>F&W Heating & Cooling

  • #2
    C

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    • #3
      the only cordless tool i currently own is a drill driver. had a 12 volt craftsman for years that served me well. it has begun to die. the batteties anyway. despite following the charging recomendations in the manual to the letter...the batteries did end up dying, and in my opinion in an untimely manner. i can barely drive 3 or 4 screws with it before it is useless.

      anyway i upgraded it...to a 12V hilti drill driver and let me tell you this thing is awesome. after 2 weeks of hard use, (not constant use, but when it was used it worked), this tool has not even borken a sweat. it is as powerful today as it was 2 weeks ago. it has taken apart and put together a waterbed, drove 4" screws into plaster and wood to mount a pot rack, been used to hang a 2 ceiling fans, and drill 3 or 4 holes with a greenlee flex bit in the floor to run conduit/cable as needed. and again it has not broken a sweat. before buying it i looked at (and used) a friends milwaukee 18V, a few 14.4's and so on. settled on the 12V hilti and it will likely be the last drill driver i will ever have to buy

      so i guess the answer to this post...short answer is 12V
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #4
        for me the trade off is power vs cost and 18 volters currently give the best. not enough 24 volt items around yet until sales pick up and price comes down. there is a downside though, between joists the 12 volter comes in handy because of smaller size. but after that first hole, out comes the 18 volter with bigger longer augers etc etc. also, 18 volters have slower speed options which help in driving long screws, especially into hardwood. buy gold screws. the rest snap after about an inch and a half into the wood. no, the torque setting isn't the problem. it's the screw material and the wood being fastened into. i just wish vendors would quit changing battery styles so batteries and chargers could be shared between all cordless tools.
        bob

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        • #5
          Spacebluesonoma? As in California? Was at Skaggs Island in the 60s. Loved the area.

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          • #6
            After using everything from 3.2 to 18V I prefer 14v. It has the run time and power to do most any job and they light enough that I can hold them overhead for an extended periods of time.

            Funny little story;
            I have a a 9.6 Dewalt and 18 Dewalt drill (I really prefer Makita) and every so often my 4 year old grandson wants to help pappy. I was installing some doors. My Grandson wanted to help so I had him hold my 9.6 drill. He would stand there holding it and hand it to me when I needed it. The battery died so I went and got the 18 volt. The two drills look the same. However the 18v being heavier was all he could carry and there was no way he could hand it to me. He would struggle trying to lift it but it was too much for him. I asked him what was wrong, if he had gotten weak.
            He got a very serious look on his little face and just shook his head and said, Pappy you have worked me so hard today I guess I just don't have anything left. I laughed so hard I couldn't lift the 18 volt either.
            Rev Ed

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            • #7
              I too used a Craftsman 12v drill for a couple of years, until the batteries croaked.(You can buy a new Craftsman 12v kit cheaper than you can replace the batteries!!!)
              Then upgraded to Porter Cable 19.2 systmem. Man!, that thing can torque you're wrist in half. Its kinda heavy for overhead work. I'm considering buying a smaller drill for this.
              The PC 19.2 circular saw is an awesome tool. I've had good luck with the batteries.
              keep makn\' sawdust!...just don\'t breath any.

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              • #8
                The only cordless tool in my inventory is a 9.6V DeWalt drill/driver and for my hobbyist use it's all that I need. If or when this one dies, I more than likely will replace it with another 9.6V. Now, if I was making a living with it, I'm sure my preferences would be entirely different.
                ================================================== ====
                ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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                • #9
                  I see a lot of 14v and 18v out there in the field. i dont use them in my line of work just fix them.

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                  • #10
                    I like the 12 volt porter cable drill that I have. I has been working great with no problems. I bought it a long time ago when they first came out.

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                    • #11
                      I have 4-9.6 volts I use for most everything. I have a pair of 18 volts that does the really heavy duty stuff.

                      If your ramming 3 1/2" screws into 2x's, use the 18v. If your doing general assembly, the 9.6v is alot easier on an old, easy tiring body.

                      No matter what volt you use, you have to put the weight behing it to hold the driver bit into the fastener. The question is: will the drill handle it? if not, then move up! But in any case, the slipping tourque setting comes in handy when using brass screws!
                      John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                      • #12
                        I use 2 drills @ 18v, and they are Dewalt the 2 spd and the 3 spd. I have two of the Dewalt 5 pack kits, my wife has her own 18v drill,and my son has a 5 pack too.( he is a carpenter too). So after all of this about Dewalt, I tried the 14.4 Ridgid and as far as torque it felt every bit like my 18 Dewalt. As you can see If I convert to ridgid, it has to be all of the cordless tools. don't want a whole bunch of different battery charges and batteries all over. but their cordless line and the new slide miter saw are definite sales this year. As good if not better than Dewalt.

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                        • #13
                          In my van I carry 1-24v Dewalt, 1-18v Dewalt, 1-original 18v Ryobi, 1-14.4v Porter-Cable, 1-14.4v Bosch, and 1-9.6v Makita. In my shop I leave 1-original 18v Ryobi, 1-14.4v craftsman, and 1 original 12v Ryobi. My all around favorite was the 18v Ryobi, until I purchased the 14.4v Bosch.

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                          • #14
                            I myself love my rigid 12 volt drill.I bought the set with the drill and right angle impact. I install cabinets and the drill does everything i could imagine.I normally work 7 days a week and it holds up great for anything i want to do. Now the only thing I would like to see is if the would make a right angle drill that wasnt a impact. The impact is way to loud when driving screws into the cabinets in tight spaces so I use my friends dewalt right angle for that. Overall I am really impressed with my 12 volt and will continue to buy Rigid 12 volts in the future.

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                            • #15
                              I use 18v and 28v.
                              Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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