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  • #16
    I have 12 right angle ridgid, 12 volt ridgid drill, 2 14.4 volt ridgid drills, 1 14.4 volt ridgid impact, 1 14.4 volt bosch drill, 2 18v ridgid drills. Favorite... 14.4V impact light and powerful.
    Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

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    • #17
      I guess a guy can change his mind too. I just reread my response from Aug of 03. My DeWalt 9.6V is still going strong however I've recently added the Ridgid 14.4V drill/driver and impact driver to my collection.
      ================================================== ====
      ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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      • #18
        12v for installing plugs, lights, and switches.
        18v for roughing in work, like lag bolts and long self tappers. and drilling through metal if I can't get my hands on a corded drill. I'd prefer to use a corded to save my batteries.

        I think the 7.2 and 9.6 are a waste of money, at least for me, my hands are to big for the tool or, the tool is to small for my hands. I had to use one a while back and got quickly frustrated with it because i had to lossen my grip and let the tool almost fall out of my hand to switch the direcion. I usually have my other hand holding a light of other device in place.

        [ 11-27-2005, 12:33 PM: Message edited by: Polar Sparky 1224 ]
        "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
        "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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        • #19
          Re: Cordless Tools

          I like useing 18v.

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          • #20
            Re: Cordless Tools

            I like both ends of the spectrum. 95% of the time I'm doing light jobs and the lighter the drill the better. I just bought a lithium B&D 14.4 volt that serves that purpose well (under 3 pounds.)



            When I need more grunt I reach for either my 18 volt Ryobi OnePlus tools...or if I'm working a serious job my 24 volt Ridgid MaxSelects.

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            • #21
              Re: Cordless Tools

              18v is the way to go for me. The size and weight difference to 14.4v is minimal enough that I'd rather take advantage of the better runtime and slightly more power of 18v. 18v sets have the best tool selection. Ever since compact 18v drills like the new Makita lithium set have come out, cost aside it is utterly pointless to buy 9.6, 12, or 14v drills. The 18v compact is lighter and smaller than all of them while still offering true 18v power.

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              • #22
                Re: Cordless Tools

                Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                18v is the way to go for me. The size and weight difference to 14.4v is minimal enough that I'd rather take advantage of the better runtime and slightly more power of 18v. 18v sets have the best tool selection. Ever since compact 18v drills like the new Makita lithium set have come out, cost aside it is utterly pointless to buy 9.6, 12, or 14v drills. The 18v compact is lighter and smaller than all of them while still offering true 18v power.
                The size of the Makita 18 volt drill is quite nice.

                It should be noted, however, that it gives up considerable power to almost every other contractor grade 18 volt drill. You can't just go by the torque ratings which show a smaller difference. In speed and power tests, the Makita lost out by a good margin to the Milwaukee V18 and DeWalt XRP DC925 18 volt drills.

                So the reality is the Makita 18V falls somewhere between the 14.4V and 18V drills. I'd be curious to see how it stacks up to a 4.8lb Panasonic 15.6 volt or the newer 3.5lb Panasonic 14.4 lithium.

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                • #23
                  Re: Cordless Tools

                  Oh yeah, it certainly isn't quite at the same level as the contactor level 18v, you give something up by going that small but it still beats most low to mid level 18v clunkers. Cpmparing it to beastly models like the DC925 and V18 is a little extreme since those drills themselves actually perform closer to that of their 28v and 36v sibling rather than the lower voltage ones. The Makita shares the same motor as the high end LXT's and its power isn't that far off from its big brother. Thats quite remarkable for a 3.5lb drill. A top of the line 14.4v like a Dewalt XRP might actually slightly beat it but those 14.4v drills are huge by comparison, same size and almost the same weight as the 18v ones.

                  My point is that at 3.5lbs and with enough power to class it close enough to a contractor level 18v drill the argument of 9.6v and 12v being more practical for small jobs sort of falls apart. If cost wasn't a factor, the choice is obvious. The 18v compact is as light and small as a 9.6v drill but has the power of a true 18v. Whats even more remarkable is that they have the new ultra compact 14.4v and 18v sets coming out later which are even smaller and lighter!
                  Last edited by Velosapien; 04-19-2007, 01:42 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Cordless Tools

                    Makita is taking what I call the "cellphone" approach to their tools. People are attracted to the smaller cooler and gadgety phones with little LED lights on them right? And let's face it, the new modern cellphones and a hell of a lot more comfortable to use than those huge "brick" phones of yesteryear.

                    So there is merit to their philosophy. They're not going for the most power on the block because they know that quite a few jobs don't need a 1 horsepower drill. Designing for the ultimate power doesn't allow optimization of the size.

                    Same with cellphones, you don't need the reception of a 2 foot car antenna if you're in the city all the time right next to a local cell station.

                    Fair enough, but for the really tough jobs, you need the higher voltage. So it comes down to what you're doing the most with the tools? Tough repetitive cutting, more occasional cutting, etc.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Cordless Tools

                      As a cabinet maker in a commercial shop......I use several different sizes/voltages, depending upon the job. I have most of them set-up with a certain bit and use the drill/driver for the task at hand. I keep a drill/countersink in a 14.4 Craftsman and a Makita 18LI impact driver on one end of the assembly bench (back bench) and another 14.4 Craftsman drill and 14.4 Craftsman impact driver on the other end. These are basically because of weight. A 10 hour shift will certainly help you make that decision. I also have a Bosch pocket driver 10.8v for small hardware jobs. The 18v Makita 1/2" hammer drill gets minimal use, usually only during installations, which I don't do regularly.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Cordless Tools

                        For the tuff work, I'm keeping my corded tools. My cordless ones are limited for now and are lighter weight "handy tool" type. Maybe someday I'll bust open my piggy bank LOL and buy a kit of big beefy and also a kit of light weight cordless tools. I really want to see power tool companies make Smart Chargers that will charge up ALL of their (same brand) batteries regardless of Voltage, or if they are Ni-Cad, Ni-MH or Li Ion type. Such a charger won't come cheap but I really hate the idea of 12 different chargers on a table.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Cordless Tools

                          i use a wide range, 24 bosh for big jobs that are clean. 18 volt ryobi for messy or wet work, the drill is cheap enough to throw away. but for the most part i use mu 18 volt dewalt impact drill, if you ever work on tin this will make your life sooo much better.
                          how is it that so many answers are in the instructions

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                          • #28
                            Re: Cordless Tools

                            I like Makita's 14.4 volt cordless tools. Good compromise between pwer and weight. I have the M force drill and the impact driver. Also have a 14.4 makita blower,stick vacuum and a flourescent light.
                            Last edited by Akita; 07-06-2007, 06:42 AM.
                            You can never have enough drills-too many is just enough!!!!!

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                            • #29
                              Re: Cordless Tools

                              Dewalt has a charger that does 9.6 volt to 18 volt. the hammer drill is the one that i use the most, also they have a shop vac that works real well for service work. I do like the drill/driver for taking off panels on the roofs.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Cordless Tools

                                I use 18 Dewalt started with a saw and drill set a number of years ago and have expanded it many times, 3 drills (one angle head), sawzall, grinder, 2 Circular saws (one metal cutting). It was what was available when I got into the cordless,

                                years ago I had a 14 volt Sears, was OK for what it was, they changed batteries styles and they became so expensive and I had a faulty charger that would fry the batteries if left in the charger, so I bought the Dewalt.
                                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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