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  • #31
    Re: dewalt vs ridgid

    I would definately go for dewalt drill bits every time but like ridgid tools better becausse they are cheaper and just as good (no offense)

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    • #32
      Re: dewalt vs ridgid

      Just wanted to add my 2 kilobytes:

      I use cordless tools on a daily basis, did a lot of research and took a lot of tools apart and tested a lot of tools. I used nearly ALL makita LXT tools (except for concrete vibrator), all 18v Dewalt tools (except for a caulking gun), and nearly all 18v Ridgid tools except for the latest drill with automatic torque adjustment, some Bosch tools and some Ryobi drills.

      Here's what matters to me when I buy tools:

      1. Quality of cells in batteries. Ridgid uses Lithium-manganese cells that degrade very fast due to charge cycles, in high temperatures (42 C or higher is damaging) and have a short shelf life (20% capacity loss per year). Same goes for milwaukee, Bosch, Panasonic, Makita, Hitachi. All these batteries lose 60% capacity after 400-600 cycles (depending on tools they were used in). Mind you, this is perfectly acceptable if you are a diy guy or a trade that does not heavily rely on cordless power. If you make cabinets etc, a 18v 1.5ah lithium Ridgid will work perfectly and will be a good investment. If you drill 1/2" holes in steel beams all day or build decks, your batteries will crap out real fast (read Amazon comments about makita batteries).

      Most companies use Sony/Konion manganese cells, Milwaukee uses Moli Energy cells (eMoli). Chemistry is different. There are 2 sizes, 18mm and 26mm diameter cells. 26mm cells are 3ah, 4v per cell. So Milwaukee V28 has 7 cells in a battery. 3ah ridgid 18v has 10 cells in a battery, 2 banks of 10 manganese cells 3.7v 1.5ah in series, connected in parallel.

      Dewalt's NANO cells are 2.3 Ah and 1.1 Ah respectively.


      The best place to find out real performance of cells are RC enthusiasts' forums. Most of serious RC guys have very nice computerized chargers and battery analyzers that will plot out performance of diffent cells under different loads after a number of cycles. So far everybody confirms eMoli have the highest energy density per cell and the worst cycle performance (6% capacity loss after 50 cycles). For serious contractors, batteries is a disposable material. If you use cordless tools moderately and they make you good money, go for V28 line. Milwaukee's 28v grinder shreds Dewalt's 18v into pieces for example.

      Who made cells for Milwaukee/TTI? Answer: http://www.e-one.com.tw/

      However, if you heavily rely on cordless, go with Dewalt.
      Dewalt developed their own formula (well, they got it from A123 Systems who got it from MIT) of Lithium Ion Iron Nano-Phosphate (LiFePO4) that has insane discharge currents (70 amps per cell) and insane cycle life. 15% capacity loss after 1000 cycles, and graph curve is a straight line, projecting into ~2000 cycles with 50% capacity loss.

      Milwaukee's 2000 cycle warranty is marketing BS. Your 2000th cycle will be a 10-screw run or 15 minutes of flashlight fun.

      I ditched my entire Makita line because of crappy cells.

      2. Quality of parts and materials: Best chucks are on Dewalt's "pro" drills, Jacobs 700 series. If you see a hammerdrill with 500 series chuck (Hello, Makita BHP451), the chuck will crap out if you use it a lot in hammer mode.

      Body plastic: Makita and Hitachi are the worst. I personally find Bosch soft enough not to shatter/crack on impact but hard enough not to bend. Nothing worse when a tool handle feels like a flaccid.... erm... "tool".

      Dewalt is very impact resistant but scuffs easily and has a low melting temperature. Grinders always have crap embedded in the tool base - hot particles melt into the casing.

      Ridgid is kinda in-between Dewalt and Bosch but also scuffs easily.

      Makita's plastic is impact resistant but rips easily. So if you have a crack somewhere, expect it to get bigger.

      Gearbox: Crappy gearbox metal results in a noisy drill and worn parts. Over time gear spindles will make the holes (where they go in) in the gearbox bigger (under load) and start rattling and at some point can just become a mush. Also, cheapo materials for gears themselves will result in eventual wear of teeth. Obviuosly, metals used to make gears in a Ryobi drill are softer than a Dewalt hammer drill.

      Pulse width modulator/Trigger: cheap drills use cheap, less efficient PWM which result in higher stress on motor and the battery. PWM controls how fast your motor spins. I like makita's PWMs because they don't have a nasty whistle like others.

      Design of circuit boards inside the chargers. Cheap chargers break when dropped. Quality chargers have a drop of glue on fragile components. Ryobi uses big transformers in their chargers, which makes them heavy and easy to damage.

      3. Availability of local service centres. I don't care for lifetime warranty if I have to sit without a tool for weeks because I have to ship it to Zimbabwe and back. I'd rather pay $50 to get it fixed in 3-5 days at a local service centre.
      Makita has a 3 year warranty on all LXT tools, so does Dewalt. LSA won't do anything extra for you except for batteries in the first 3 years. Dewalt's batteries have 2yr warranty BTW. Also, manganese Li-Ion cells cost $3.50 a piece or less, so 5 cells in your battery costs ridgid $20. And $80 for you. So effectively ridgid can give you 2 more new batteries and they still make money.

      4. Motor efficiency. Dewalt's 6-1/4 circular cuts 74 2x4 with a 2.4 Ah battery. Makita's LXT BSS610 cuts 65 2x4 with a 3 Ah battery. And Makita's marketing keeps blowing the horn how their 4-pole motor is better than dewalt's 2-pole motor.

      5. Tool weight. I had an X2 18v drill and got rid of it after 3 days. I go to work to make money, not to pump iron. If I need power I grab my Dewalt 36v drill, if I need to drill holes, I use my Dewalt DC827 impact or Makita's BTP140 hybrid impact (which I modified to take light 1.5 Ah batteries) with a 1/2 chuck adapter or a 4v Milwaukee's Li-Ion screwdriver for under 1/4" holes.

      ---------------------

      Bottom line: when it comes to cordless power tools, professionals pick Dewalt, Makita or Bosch, depending on country. Ridgid is still an "outsider", and I will explain why. What TTI is trying to do is wedge themselves into the marketplace by using their plumbing reputation and "value" such as pricing and better warranty. The reason they are experiencing an EPIC FAIL is:
      1. Black&Decker is huge, and dealer prices are just as good as Ridgids (I can get a 36v Dewalt hammer drill for $60, bare tool. Good luck getting that from Ridgid for that price).
      2. Rather than doing serious R&D like Makita with LXT tools, Bosch with their 10.8v tools or Dewalt with NANO batteries and a new circ saw, TTI plays "industrial lego" - take existing technology, slap it together into a product, cross their fingers and put it on the shelves.

      Ridgid has it's own market niche and dewalt has it's own. Comparing the two is like comparing an industrial supplier and Home Depot.
      Last edited by DRC-Wartex; 10-17-2008, 10:40 PM.

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: dewalt vs ridgid

        Thank you for that great post. The whole battery issue comes up a lot in these forums and a lot of people have a hard time getting past the fact that their favorite brand doesn't actually make their battery cells and there are real world factors that dictate how batteries behave. Marketing claims are almost always BS. Just because they make good tools doesn't always mean they have the best batteries. From now on I'll just link to this .

        2. Quality of parts and materials: Best chucks are on Dewalt's "pro" drills, Jacobs 700 series. If you see a hammerdrill with 500 series chuck (Hello, Makita BHP451), the chuck will crap out if you use it a lot in hammer mode.
        Dewalt has dropped Jacobs on most/all of their high end drills now. They now use the Rohm self tightening chucks which are awesome. Even the keyed chuck drills are Rohm now. I also have the Makita BHP451 which has the lousy Jacobs 500. After almost two years it feels like it wants to fall apart. Even worse the bits slip even with the chuck tighted with a deathgrip. The only solution is to avoid smooth shank bits.


        4. Motor efficiency. Dewalt's 6-1/4 circular cuts 74 2x4 with a 2.4 Ah battery. Makita's LXT BSS610 cuts 65 2x4 with a 3 Ah battery. And Makita's marketing keeps blowing the horn how their 4-pole motor is better than dewalt's 2-pole motor.
        This is the case with most of the LXT tools with a few exceptions most have sub standard run time and power. I had 18v XRP tools and switched to LXT only to find out it was mostly a downgrade. The circular saw didn't perform that much better but it was easier and more comfortable to handle as well as including a much better blade. The BHP451 was overall very good. It's light weight makes it very versatile but the XRP DC925 flies circles around it. In many situations the NiCD battery life was about the same as Makita's 3.0ah li-ion. The reciprocating saw was just a stunning piece of junk. Besides being massively underpowered it could barely cut 7 or 8 2X4's before loosing most of it's power. To add insult to injury it's larger AND heavier than a Dewalt 36V recip saw which completely annihalates it in every respect. The Impact driver is just all around perfect sweetness.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: dewalt vs ridgid

          Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
          Dewalt has dropped Jacobs on most/all of their high end drills now. They now use the Rohm self tightening chucks which are awesome. Even the keyed chuck drills are Rohm now. I also have the Makita BHP451 which has the lousy Jacobs 500. After almost two years it feels like it wants to fall apart. Even worse the bits slip even with the chuck tighted with a deathgrip. The only solution is to avoid smooth shank bits
          Velo I have similar issues with the Makita 18V chuck BHP452 with small drill bits yet have noticed it less with the similar 18V Ridgid chuck. I would like to remove my corded Makita hammerdrill keyless chuck but the manual makes no mention of it. Any ideas? I did not see a screw or bolt in the chuck.
          Last edited by reConx; 10-18-2008, 10:53 AM.

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          • #35
            Re: dewalt vs ridgid

            It should have a left hand thread slotted screw in the chuck. My 451 at least has it because was going to take it out and swap the chuck for a Jacobs 700 from an old 14.4v XRP I don't use much anymore.

            I think Ridgid might use the 700 if it's a Jacobs chuck because I seem to remember the specs saying it was a carbide reinforced chuck.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: dewalt vs ridgid

              Hi Velosapien, you are correct and I forgot to mention Rohm chucks on new stuff. I own the 36v hammerdrill and a DC927 18v hammer, both have Rohm. I got my last 36v tool today - the jigsaw, and now I have a full kit of all 36v tools. Dewalt's DC330/331/308 jigsaws are the best freaking jigsaws in the world.

              I tested the makita grinder VS dewalt 18v grinder, and Makita was much better, but makita has a bigger battery. (10 cuts of 1/2 rebar, 2.4 Ah vs 17 cuts of rebar, 3.0 Ah), that and the BTP140 impact which I still have are my favourite tools. I almost cried when I sold my LXT grinder to my buddy, but when I tested the new 36v dewalt, I was blown away.

              PS: Makita's cells are 1460 Mah, so battery is 2.92 Ah, not 3. They never really give out full 2.9 Ah unlike NiCd due to cutoff voltage, so they are like 2.8 Ah. Which means that LXT grinder has a really nice motor in it.

              PPS: You can get a rohm chuck from dewalt service center for your makita. You need to use threadlocking goop because it has no center screw.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                DeWalt's 36V jigsaw is awesome. I can't believe how much power it has and how smoothly it cuts. It's a very addictive too to use. I often find myself using it for quick cuts on things that I would have used the circular saw for before.

                Also check out the grinder too. I got that one a while back and it has massive power and very good battery runtime. I was also surprised at how well it works with sanding and flap discs, despite being geared more as a cutting tool.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                  newbie here - appreciate seeing others' experiences and opinions. sort of like a photocopy being called a 'xerox' or a tissue being called a 'kleenex' - it's the geek in me that would say that I noticed no one mentioned that "Skill Saw" would technically not be any circular saw or specifically worm-drive saw, but a Brand Name worm drive saw (SKILL) from the Robert Bosch Tool Corp and of course (again nothing new here, just being geekish) a "Sawzall" is the proprietary name of Milwaukee Tool's reciprocating saw (the former quality-tool name Porter Cable has their 'Tigersaw' recip saw). No surprize that the original inventor and/or the top quality makers brand name tools somehow evolve into the default name for any manufacturer producing a similar tool. Pretty much every recip saw is called a sawzall (though everyone knows Milwaukee makes the best sawzall)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                    Tool Use: heavy or light? "75% Light 25% Heavy"

                    Brand Preference: Dewalt or Ridgid? "Ridgid"

                    Why? "Better features and Options"

                    Does Country of Origin Matter? "Yes but limited choices"

                    Did you check Country of Origin for last tool you bought? "Yes"

                    Ridgid Lifetime Warranty: "Yes"

                    I'd buy a Ridgid tool over another brand just because of it, yes or no? "Yes"

                    Is this intended to make up for manufacturing defects that are worse than other branTool Use: "No"

                    A lower price than the competition ($5-$10) is very important when deciding which tool to buy. "Yes on $50 tool, but, No on a$400 tool"


                    Good Questions.


                    Ken

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                    • #40
                      Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                      Speaking as a homeowner/DIY'r, I can't knock my five piece Ridgid 18volt nicad set purchased several years ago. Tools are well made, have held up to project and occassional use and the batteries and charger are great. My problem with Ridgid compared to DeWalt is that as my needs and desire to expand my cordless tool collection grows, Ridgid has nothing to fill my needs!
                      DeWalt offers the cordless grinders, heavy duty 1/2inch impact wrench and other tools I could use. I don't expect tools, cordless or otherwise to last indefinately, things wearout, break and batteries eventually die. The warranty Ridgid offers is very attractive, but their refusal to compete with DeWalt, Bosch, Milwaukee and others by matching tool for tool has convinced me to switch brands in the future. I respect the Diy'rs and Pro's who have set needs and find Ridgid the right brand for them, but for those who might consider expanding their cordless tool collection, Ridgid is a dead end.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                        For my business, the compact cordless tools are what I want and use daily. Milwaukee, Makita, Ridgid, and even Ryobi are canadates. (Ryobi makes sense from a money stand point, as a disposable tool. If run time would ever be an issue, then 120v tools would work fine. So for me, not being in the heavy construction field, Dewalt was the Dead End street. They are sadly lacking in the Compact Tool area.

                        The Ridgid R86007 18V drill with the shortest length of any 18V, fits my needs perfect.

                        Their two speed 12V drill, also having the shortest length of any subcompact works great as powerfull screwdriver and an extra 3/8" drill.

                        Ridgid's One Handed 18V Recip. saw does the small stuff and, (like I posted else where) will cut a 4X6 in less the 55 seconds.

                        All three of these work for me daily.

                        I have confidence, when I need a new battery the LSA will save me some money. I might have to use a 120V tool for a week or two if I can't manage on my remaining batteries.

                        After reading all of the posts in this thread it becomes clear no one manufacturer has the best of everything so being brand loyal can be a handicap. So maybe there might be a Dewalt in my future, but then I would have to look at Makita... etc.

                        Ken
                        Last edited by kheim; 09-03-2009, 04:08 PM.

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                        • #42
                          Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                          I Live & work in Norway, so Bosch is a natural choice for my speciall tools.
                          I'm a Stainless Master, so my straight grinders, drills, and angle grinder/cutters have a hard life. The service back-up (Quick service/repair) is unique, and warranty (3years) is never an issue. The dealer will get me what I need (& not just what he want's to sell), within days, even if it has to be made /sent from Gemany!
                          However, This all comes at a price! The price is high. You get what you pay for! Bosch (Blue-Proff)for your heavy duty tools is amazing, but for 4-5 times a month, then alternatives are more cost-effective.
                          How widespread is Bosch in the US? Just curious!

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                          • #43
                            Re: dewalt vs ridgid

                            Dewalt and Milwaukee (in that order) seem to be the sales leaders among Pros. Makita a Bosch are competing for third among sales to Pros. Just for sales among all buyers I would not be surprised if Ryobi out sold all of them. Bosch has a image for top quality and is very well respected in the U.S.

                            These are just my opinions and I have no facts to support them. Hopefuly you will get some others to contribute their thoughts about Bosch tools.


                            Ken

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