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  • Shop vacuum registration - where?

    I went to the Ridgid website to try and register my 2 new WD3050 (WD30500) shop vacs and guess what? This model number is not listed. I get the strange feeling this model has been discontinued. Anyway, anybody know a workaround, other than I may have to return them due to not being able to register them? One of the main reasons I'm buying Ridgid tools and other Ridgid items is because of their "Lifetime Warranty". I'm just funny that way. I have an email out to customer service and I hope they will help me register my shop vacs. If not, "Return To Vendor" as Elvis would say, if he were here. Or. something like that. Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Frankhe1 View Post
    I went to the Ridgid website to try and register my 2 new WD3050 (WD30500) shop vacs and guess what? This model number is not listed. I get the strange feeling this model has been discontinued. Anyway, anybody know a workaround, other than I may have to return them due to not being able to register them? One of the main reasons I'm buying Ridgid tools and other Ridgid items is because of their "Lifetime Warranty". I'm just funny that way. I have an email out to customer service and I hope they will help me register my shop vacs. If not, "Return To Vendor" as Elvis would say, if he were here. Or. something like that. Thanks
    Hi! You can register your product by clicking "Register Your Product" on the product page for the WD3050 vac: https://www.ridgid.com/us/en/3-gallon-portable-pro-vac. Note that registration is not required on RIDGID wet/dry vacs; they come standard with the Full Lifetime Warranty. Thanks for your purchase!

    Comment


    • Frankhe1
      Frankhe1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, sir.

  • #3
    Unless things have changed in the last couple of years, there is no need to register for the "Lifetime Warranty" on Ridgid shop vacs. First, take a look at the paperwork that came with your shop vac, to make sure that I'm still correct.

    Second, the registration for most Ridgid power tools is NOT for a lifetime warranty, but for the "Limited Lifetime Service Agreement" (LLSA) which is for free service of those tools via a "Ridgid Authorized Service Center", should the tool fail in any way. (The warranty with LLSA registration is 3-years.) The "LLSA" is for tools manufactured by TTI, under license to use the Ridgid name and is for most all the hand-held and stationary "Ridgid" branded tools sold at Home Depot.

    BUT... (and that's a big "but"), the Ridgid Shop Vac's are NOT made by TTI, and instead, made by Ridgid's parent company Emerson Electric! (I know, it's confusing!) So, shop vacs do not qualify for TTI's service agreement and therefore are not register-able. HOWEVER... Ridgid shop vacs do come with their own "Lifetime Warranty" (not a service agreement). The Ridgid shop vac "Lifetime Warranty" covers defects in materials and workmanship.

    Great, because on the positive side, you don't have to register; but you do need to keep a copy of your receipt (make a copy, those original receipts fade within a few months). You still get any repairs done at a Ridgid Authorized Service Center. However, on the negative side, Ridgid considers "Lifetime" as the length of operational time it takes to wear out the motor brushes... at which time the "lifetime" of the tool is done and the "materials and workmanship" coverage is over! The motor brushes are not replaceable and Ridgid does not sell replacements.... supposedly!

    Now, that is how the shop vac warranty was working the last time I knew. Whether it is still that way or not I honestly don't know, but the warranty information you received with the product should clarify that to some degree, hopefully. I have two Ridgid 12 gal shop vacs and they have both held up remarkable well. I'm only a homeowner and wood worker though and do not use either of them on a weekly basis. Both units are close to 10 or 12 years old now.

    Hope this helped,

    CWS

    Comment


    • Frankhe1
      Frankhe1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for your help in this matter. Very detailed. I like that.

  • #4
    Dont worry, Ridgid makes great wet dry vacs. Pair them with a dust separator and add some dust bags and you'll have a drywall dust eating machine.

    Comment


    • Frankhe1
      Frankhe1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Roger that. Thanks!

  • #5
    I should mention if your not already familiar to consider a clean stream filter which you can find at HD and HD online. It's a serious Goretex filter and cleaning it is snap. I use a chip brush or just tap it with a paint stirrer and the dust falls off. Plus you won't need to buy those shabby paper filters...ever!

    The downside is that with the newer design, wet or heavier filters sometimes fall off. Clean stream filters are a little heavier due to the robust construction. The older vacs had a mechanical fastener which solved the problem, this is really my only beef with the wet dry vacs.

    Comment


    • #6
      I use my ridgid vac to suck up everything from sewage, mud and even for cleaning up ditches when I dig up to add a cleanout. Much for easier to suck up dirt than to try and shovel dirt in a small ditch 2-5' deep.

      was thinking of converting a heavy plastic chemical barrel into a 2 head shop vac with a 3" or 4" hose.


      ​​​​​​
      Rick
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • Mightyservant
        Mightyservant commented
        Editing a comment
        They work great, we use Milwaukee heads on standard 55 gal drums to put suction on system when we work on them to keep the mess down. It's wide a open, I've got a 30 gal drum here at home with 4" ports and have reducers so I can use 2" hoses.

    • #7
      Jon,

      I believe "Shop-Vac" is a totally different brand, NOT a Ridgid product. (see: https://www.shopvac.com/ ) I notice that you posted "Chile" as your location, Welcome! Here in the U.S., the term "Shop Vac" is used generically, and not always as the brand "Shop-Vac"... we can be confusing at times I'm sure.

      Regarding the Ridgid (Emerson Electric Division manufactured) shop vacuums, my experience is notably different than "cheap, Chinese, crap". I have three of the Ridgid products and they're all pretty well built. My two 12-gallon vacs are more than 15 years old and have gotten me through a couple of house renovations (construction debris, tear-outs, drywall dust, etc.) as well as several years in my wood working shop. About the only annoyance is when a wheel falls off because I've bumped it around too much.... and that is simply a matter of sliding it back into position! The thichness of the container walls is substantial enough and I've yet to even have one chip, and certainly no cracks... and I can't imagine a dent, the material would break first I think.

      In any case, welcome to the forum and note I just wanted to clarify possible differences between brands, so please don't take offense as none was intended.

      CWS

      Comment


      • blue_can
        blue_can commented
        Editing a comment
        CWS - the poster you welcomed above is a spammer. Note how the post has been edited to drop a link.

      • CWSmith
        CWSmith commented
        Editing a comment
        blue_can,

        Thanks, I don't see that poster anymore, so they must have removed their post. "Spammer"... I rarely pay attention, just try to post and answer to their question and be welcoming. I see not harm in that. If they are spammers, then they'll go away or reveal themselves as such with a second post.

        Appreciate your notice though,

        CWS

    • #8
      I am in the same boat as you CWS in that my Craftsman wet/dry vac (also made by Emerson for Sears years ago) has yet to fail me. The tub is thick and sturdy material I agree. But what was the norm decades ago is extraordinary now-a-days. I bet every manufacturer is thinning the tub walls as much as possible to reduce the amount of raw material that goes into the finished product. As long as it will hold up for 3 or 4 years my guess is they think they have a winner. My craftsman vac is on it's last legs, but that is only because I need new brushes for the motor, everything else works fine. Once I renew the brushes it should be good as new and ready for another 29 years. :-) No one builds them like that today, not for less than $100 they don't.
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

      ----

      Comment


      • CWSmith
        CWSmith commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Bob,

        I had a Sears shop vacs, which I purchase back in the early 70's, one with the green tub. It was great, but in my generosity I loaned it out to a so-called friend and after almost a year I finally went over to his house to get it.... he had left it filled with water and drywall dust and the metal liner between the motor and the tub was completely corroded through, the filter was rotted, and the motor looked a mess. I kept the tub though, as it made a great trash container... I didn't keep the "friend" though, as he thought his destruction of the shop vac wasn't his fault.

        CWS

    • #9
      Keep in mind today I'd say 50-70% of the plastic is recycled! This will not last as long
      as pure virgin plastic nor can you repair it with plastic welding!
      Virgin plastic is superior to the mix of virgin and recycled!
      Yes products are also made "thinner"

      Cactus Man

      Comment


      • #10
        Perhaps I should go check the latest products before I offer my opinion of "What is".... either that or just comment with "What used to be".

        I know recent discussions on other Ridgid tools, like the cordless 18-V circular saw's base plate and, not too long ago their router, has left me with the thought that I'm glad I made my purchases fifteen or more years ago. But I suppose while such things are more cheaply made, the prices sure don't reflect that and I don't see the technology advancing to make up the difference in the drop in material quality, but of course I don't buy all that many tools of late.

        CWS

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