Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who provides your tools at work?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Who provides your tools at work?

    Ok, I'm a tool junkie. Be it hand tools or power tools, if I think it can make my life easier, I buy it. Now, when I started my current job 4 1/2 years ago, I was told that all I needed was a tape measure and a pencil. Well, after a couple of weeks, I started to bring some of my personal tools in. Currently, I have a huge assortment of power tools and hand tools on the truck. For some reason, it offends my coworkers so I have decided to take everything home. My supervisor has told me to give him a list of what tools I needed and he would see if they could provide them all. I'm being cautious about what I ask for because I have some things that are used maybe twice a year in a very rare situation. I'm most likely going to ask for the obvious and see what happens.

    So, what about you folks, who supplies your tools at work?

  • #2
    That's exactly what happens in the union around here. Guys started to bring tools that the boss are legally obliged to supply. The old guys who fought their entire life for their rights to have a convention and not be treated as slaves and now the young yahoos messing it all up in a 10 year span. Well guess what on small jobs and medium job, the boss harasses the guys and threatens to fire you because you didn't bring power tools and you are slower than the others who brought them in, some bring in step ladders, extension cords, specialty tools. Even though it's illegal for the boss not to supply tools they still do it, the guys have become pirates and screw all their co workers to keep their gang plank job.

    It's gotten to the point guys started to supply solder, paste, and other supplies they steal acetylene B-tanks/torches from their previous employer to work for another pirate company. Why do they steal a b-tank and torch you ask, well their new employer has only one torch for 7 guys. Who do you think will keep his job? The companies don't supply safety equipment and when you get hurt they cheat the system and blame you for not following safety rules. You get a broken hand and you get ZERO compensation.

    Yep start bringing tools to work, that's how it's starts.

    F_c_K those guys.
    Last edited by Pro Service; 03-10-2019, 09:33 AM.

    Comment


    • Bob D.
      Bob D. commented
      Editing a comment
      Its legal because its in the signed contract, not by any law.

  • #3
    It's the same with school teachers buying classroom project supplies out of their pocket. They should NOT do that. It hides to the taxpayer the true cost of running the school for one.

    On the jobsite, my opinion is that ANY employer, big shop or small, that allows an employee to bring in tools is asking for trouble. What happens when that ladder one of your mean well employees brought in is used by another of your employees, or worse yet by some other contractors employee, and they get injured. Maybe because the ladder failed or maybe because they took a chance and misused the ladder. Either way the employer of the employee, the person who brought the ladder onto the jobsite, and the employer of the person who brought the ladder in and allowed it to be used on site will ALL be in court. The employers have insurance to cover their butts, that well meaning employee most likely does not and could lose everything he owns.

    Yes, I know you've done it for 10 years an nothing bad ever happened. Remember those 100 year floods that somehow happen three years in a row? The laws of probability WILL catch up with you sooner or later.

    Part of the reason for union contracts have the employer supply the tools is for situations just like I described above. Also, the employee should not be financing the job, and the cost of tools is part of the cost of the job.

    So if you love giving your employer greater profits and yourself more risk, go ahead and bring your tools on the job.

    Now, having said all that if you were hired with the provision that you supply some level of tooling, or maybe ALL your tools, AND you are compensated for that then not an issue. You knew what you were getting into when you signed up. But, I hope you have insurance to CYA because the scenario above could still drag your butt into court if someone grabs your 18 and in the course of using it slips and knocks out three of their teeth, or worse falls off a ladder and dies. Their wife (and her lawyer) will not care that you told the guy: "use it at your own risk". That will not hold up in court, and you will be screwed. That lawyer will not care one bit that he is ruining your future and taking all your savings, your pickup truck, your kids college savings, and your boat. His only interest is in getting as much money for his client because the larger that settlement is the more money he makes (percentage of award).

    Go ahead, bring that old wood Type II ladder on the job, I dare ya.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

    ----

    Comment


    • #4
      Our first set of hand tools and safety equipment are provided to us a an apprentice by the company per the contract. If you want more that the basic kit your on your own somewhat. All power tools, cordless tools, ladders, lifts, gang boxes, cords, ropes, chains, safety equipment etc are provided by the contractor.

      As a journyman most hand tools are replaced with a basic replacement i.e Ridgid pipe wrench, Channelock pliers, Empire torpedo, Stanly tape measure, Estwing hammer, Crecent wrench, Enders screwdriver, Fiber metal hard hat, etc. But often a journyman might prefer a specific tool which often are more costly and if your a foreman you might get it but most feel it's a bit unreasonable to ask. Those that do buy higher end tools to use on the job will get them replaced when worn out or stolen. albeit somewhat reluctantly, it really is case by case. The company does not provide gloves although they will give you some if your out, just don't make it a habit.

      About the only thing the company won't replace is a smart phone. If you use your personal phone at work and it takes a dump you'll get a basic phone for free from the contractor.
      Last edited by Mightyservant; 03-10-2019, 08:39 PM.

      Comment


      • #5
          • Bob D.
            #2.1
            Bob D. commented
            Today, 10:45 AM
            Its legal because its in the signed contract, not by any law.
            • Flag
        What are you referring to?

        Comment


        • Bob D.
          Bob D. commented
          Editing a comment
          Your comment: "Guys started to bring tools that the boss are legally obliged to supply"

          Or am I misunderstanding you. I took that to mean that employees were legally obligated
          to supply certain tools required to perform their work. Were you saying something else?

      • #6
        I guess it depends on the trade. I've been a Cabinet Maker / Woodworker all of my working career. I started in the Carpenters Union, never had any hand tools supplied by the company. They did supply power tools, ladders, safety equipment and such. Just not hand tools. Drill bits and router bits were replaced if you turned in the dull or broken one. Router bits had to be the same brand that the company bought.

        Fast forward 28 years and I briefly worked for a local franchise of an International Closet Co. Every installer had to supply ALL of your own tools, including power tools. This wasn't a big deal for me because I already owned them. New guys were given a loan to buy a table saw, miter saw, compressor, nail gun, drill, impact, multi tool and assorted hand tools. I was about $1200 on average.

        I was surprised when I started my current job and was told that I didn't even need hand tools. Now, company wide, there is on about 5 installers in 2 different divisions. As millwork installers, we need more tools than the other division. One interesting thing that I've come to realize is that we don't need that many specialized tools. I have been carrying way too many tools, lol.

        Comment


        • #7
          Yes it does depend on the company. We have competitors that we desperately rely on for price support and at times when they get busy they can't even supply the obligatory tools let alone replace or supply handtools. Journymen will often get poorly maintained tools or not get them for days. As I said, this is the competition. I was once told that I had more hole saws on site that his old company had in there shop. Over time I've come to realize that we are well managed and well equipped.

          I can't really blame the company's for not wanting to supply tools, employees need to have skin in the game. Every fitter probably has at least one cordless tool permanently assigned to there own garage. When journymen come work for us they often bring the previous company's cordless tools. I guess it's the cost of doing business. We have partially solved this problem by giving bonus's to every employee from drivers, secretaries, designers, Journymen, apprentices, everybody. When you have money on the line your attitude changes.

          I would think in your trade it never hurts to have options and you've got a lot of them. A typical fitter in our trade can get by with a bucket full of handtools but most have at least 2 for extras.

          Comment


          • #8
            In the old days of the plumbers union, the company supplied everything. In the mid 80's the contract was changed and the journeymen supplied the 2 most common tools lost, stolen or taken.

            Who want's to guess what they were?

            I'll give it a day unless someone nails it.

            Rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • Mightyservant
              Mightyservant commented
              Editing a comment
              I worked with a old fitter that really sharp and did design work at one time. A 6' rule is all he used and he'd flip that out in nothing flat, fold it up almost as fast. I really liked that old buzzard even though he'd ride me about my cheaters.

              I emnded up buying one but I never did get very fast with it.
              Last edited by Mightyservant; 03-11-2019, 05:48 PM.

            • PLUMBER RICK
              PLUMBER RICK commented
              Editing a comment
              Bob, when you work with piping that's 21' , 20' and possibly 10' lengths, a 6' rule is not only slow, but not very accurate trying to measure anything beyond it's 6' capacity. sure i own one, but only because I didn't own one. Then forget about laying out a deck.

              I carry a caliper and micrometer on the truck, something that I do use.

              Rick.

            • Bob D.
              Bob D. commented
              Editing a comment
              The question was who supplies your tools, not what was needed to do the work. No question a tape measure is a better choice for many measuring tasks. A rule also has advantages. I never said a rule was 'better' than a tape measure. I do maintain it has advantages over a tape in some situations.

              So again, in answer to the question, all we were required to supply is a 6 foot rule, a pair of channel locks(or similar pliers), and a pocket level.

              Also, your sector of the pipe trades time/space continuum is vastly different than what I did. Plumbing and fitting are two different animals. And I'm not saying one is better than the other, just different and many of the tools required are different, and yet many are the same. I have no need for a K-60, you don't like using a folding rule. So what.

          • #9
            Yes, definitely varies by trade. I was speaking about plumbing and fitting, not electrical or carpentry or the other skilled trades. I believe around here Electricians supply most of their hand tools, but no power tools. Don't know about the Carpenters, Masons, Tin Knockers, or others.

            It's how I came to get my Milwaukee Hole Shooter 1/2" VSR drill. I was the last man on a job and there for a couple days to clean up punch list items and finish installing a pneumatic tube system. The shop came over the weekend and took all the gangboxes with all the tools and moved them to the next job. I came in Monday and had nothing. Needed a drill to complete some work so I just went down to the local hardware store and bought one as I needed one at home anyway. Never turned in the receipt which I would have been compensated for because I kept the drill for my home shop. Usually would not do that but this was a case where ?I would be the only one using the tool on the job and it was purchased with my money.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

            ----

            Comment


            • Mightyservant
              Mightyservant commented
              Editing a comment
              I've done that numerous times when I couldn't wait for a delivery or the shop thought it was frivolous. Years ago I was running a residential project called the Harbor Club in San Diego. Every craft had 2 way radios that is everybody but us so I asked for them and the office balked so I found some in the want ads.

              It embarrassed the office when word got around and they insisted on compensating me but those motorolas went everywhere with me until we got Nextel push to talk handsets.

          • #10

            #5.1
            Bob D. commented
            Today, 03:23 AM
            Your comment: "Guys started to bring tools that the boss are legally obliged to supply"

            Or am I misunderstanding you. I took that to mean that employees were legally obligated
            to supply certain tools required to perform their work. Were you saying something else?
            I meant employers here have to supply tools to their employees. Plumbing/construction employees(Not service work, that's another set of laws) have to supply a list of about 15 basic hand tools for their plumbing trade. Everything else outside of that it's the employer's responsibility. Most other jobs(outside construction) tools are fully supplied by the employer.

            There is one plumbing company in particular that is bad, they tell the apprentices fresh out of school to supply their tools, generators and trailer and convert hours into piece work. Those kids thought they were like contractors and were thinking awesome! These kids submitted their tool receipts for their taxes at the end of the year. Guess what the government fined those kids. I know one personally who got around a 20 000$ fine. The rest of them had between 15 to 30 thousand in fines. They were not contractors but employees and the government treated them like fraud cases. Make sure you know what the law is about supplying tools in your area.
            Last edited by Pro Service; 03-11-2019, 01:01 PM.

            Comment


            • #11
              Years ago I worked for New York Telephone as a fleet mechanic, telephone installer/repairman, and utility lineman. You could not use your own tools, and as a motor vehicle mechanic they provided no power tools! We worked like cavemen, efficiency had no place on the job. The tools provided for the other jobs was slightly, but still no power drill, only a "Yankee" drill for the small stuff. Most holes needed to secure hardware on poles was done with a brace and bit, although impact drills were provided as time passed. In my opinion it is better to provide your own tools, chances are you will work more efficiently, and take better care of them.

              Comment


              • Mightyservant
                Mightyservant commented
                Editing a comment
                I agree that you take better care of your tools since you have "skin in the game". But I also think there has to be a limit after all we are makeing money for our companies and they too need to have skin in it.

                I remember the first time I was working alongside a plumber and asked him if I could borrow a sawzall for a minute. He was visibly surprised at the question and later he explained that it was his own sawzall along with everything else he packed in included a material cart he wheeled everything around in probably close to $1k worth of tools with backups in his truck.

            • #12
              Great responses everyone, thanks.

              I had my cordless tools replaced yesterday with one provided by my employer. Everything that I asked for. Remember, I voluntarily brought my own tools in, it was never expected, implied or even mentioned by my employer. I decided to use my own tools. Now, after 4+ years at my current position, I have a pretty good idea of what I need to efficiently do my job. I'll wait a couple of weeks and give them a short list of hand tools. I have no doubt that I'll get those as well.

              Comment

            Working...
            X