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  • Are You a Tool Snob?

    I kind of think I am, but selectively. Some tools are made and meant to be disposable. For example: There is no point in buying a top quality paint brush for some task that will be less than "show quality" and the product will ruin the brush. (Painting my propane tank - perfect example - the aluminum paint will ruin what ever type of brush you stick in it.) So, I'm not going to buy a Purdy brush for the task, but one of those out of the $.99 bucket. Do your tools have to "have helped us get a man on the moon"? Do you accept "new tool" introductions - only to find them outsourced from overseas (IRWIN)?

    Or, would you "not be caught dead" with the Taiwan/China stuff in your truck?

    Do you insist on everything being....

    All Craftsman/Husky/Kobalt mechanics tools?
    or all Snap-On/MAC tools?

    All <insert universal Taiwan Brand here> woodworking tools?
    or all Delta? (or whatever you feel is best)

    Has to be Ridgid pipe wrench? or is "Taiwan"/Harbor Freight OK for occassional use?

    MADE IN USA?/Europe?/Japan? quality
    or is China?/Taiwan? quality good enough?

    Did you buy a cheapo recip saw to keep that primo Milwaukee saw out of the real mess and grime?

    Do you tease your co-workers who buy "the inexpensive" quality tools?
    Do you brag endlessly about your good stuff?


    And the big question:


    Ginger?
    or Mary Ann?


    Let's see - Mary Ann - she's a country girl, can help feed the livestock, can cook, baits her own hook...etc. possibly owns her own boat AND tractor...

    Ginger - can't cook, high maintenance, looks great coming or going - if she's made up.
    Phil
    Tools Rule

  • #2
    Depends how big is Mary Anns boat?
    SSG, U.S. Army
    Retired
    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

    Comment


    • #3
      I own a full spectrum of tools and all kind of "quality", meaning that much is SK in the hand tools and some Sears craftsman, actually a lot of harbor freight, and a lot in-between,

      a lot is what it is going to be used for , pipe wrenches and threaders are ridgid, (i tried on set of harbor freight {the whole set was less than one 24" ridgid}), but they have be put in to the tractor to tighten the nuts on the end of the disk or to loan out,

      some hammers I loan out are harbor freight, and tools that are subject to easy lost, I usly buy a lesser quality, like the tools that stay in the tractor tool box, as it is many times lost before it is wore out or broke,

      most of the shop tools that are used constantly are sk wrenches or other quality brands, the extra large wrenches are harbor freight, and have yet to have a problem with them and and my over sized socket set in 3/4 is harbor freight, but the smaller 3/4 is sk,

      my 1/2 air wrench is american made but it is also 20+ years old, but I have a 3/4 and a 1" impact that is harbor,

      the table saw and wood working equipment is mostly old us, except for my grizzly shaper,

      I would like to buy all american but any more you can't
      much of delta is out sources, I bought some OTC, pullers the other day, and when it came in it was china made,

      but the many of the newer china made stuff is not bad in quality, I just do not have the money to buy all USA, and then you buy from a USA company only to find out it was still made in china,

      but I really do like quality, regardless of where it comes from

      one of the the other problems is things are not supported by the manufacture any more and they are not designed to be service, just to be tossed in so many areas,

      I have a Mikita drill, (looks like the Milwaukee hole hog), I was using it in reverse a lot and it broke off the screw holding the chuck in, so I call the repair place and (i was in need of using it) and he explained it was old and parts were nearly impossible to get for that model any more, so I asked about just using red lock tite on the chuck and he said well if it need to be repaired you will not be able to disassemble it, I asked what difference does it make if parts are not available for it? I ended up lock tighten ing it.

      so if in a few years the "tool is obsolete by the manufactures opinion", your basically just buying a throw away tool any way, it is becoming just like the electronics industry,

      so buy the quality you need for the job your using it for frequency of use, is my way of looking at it,
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Snob...no way. I've got or have had Craftsman, Delta, GI, Grizzly, Ridgid, HF, Homier, PC, Milwaukee, Freud, Makita, Incra, Stanley, Forrest, Woodcraft, dollar store stuff, B&D, Ryobi, DeWalt, Whiteside ...you name it. Whatever it takes, whoever's got the best deal for the right tool.
        Last edited by hewood; 04-01-2006, 08:32 AM.

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        • #5
          I'm with hewood on this. Lets see, I have Bostitch, Campbell Hausfeld, Craftsman, Delta, DeWalt, Freud, HF, Incra, Irwin, Jet, Kreg, Makita, McCulloch, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Ridgid, Shop Vac, Skil, Stanley, Tool Shop, and others. I do try and buy the best tool I can that will match the expected useage I plan to give it.

          Also, Mary Ann is sooooo much hotter than Ginger ever imagined herself to be.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BadgerDave
            I'm with hewood on this. Lets see, I have Bostitch, Campbell Hausfeld, Craftsman, Delta, DeWalt, Freud, HF, Incra, Irwin, Jet, Kreg, Makita, McCulloch, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Ridgid, Shop Vac, Skil, Stanley, Tool Shop, and others. I do try and buy the best tool I can that will match the expected useage I plan to give it.

            Also, Mary Ann is sooooo much hotter than Ginger ever imagined herself to be.
            I AM a tool snob, but there is relief...a quick trip to our local Ace Hardware and I found a cool pocket screwdriver that made me stash my Snap-On pocket screwdriver back in my rollcab. For about 1/5 the price of the Snap-On.
            It's a Lutz File & Tool Co. reversible pocket screwdriver. Now, don't go searching for the Lutz website - it comes up as Gorilla Glue.
            Lutz 2 n 1 pocket screwdriver
            After using it for a while, I returned to get 6 more to stash in various tool bags/boxes - here n there. (Alright, they weren't almost out of them - I wanted a few more from this lot! and I did give 2 away.)
            I'm working on accepting the lesser (read cheaper) type tools, and every time I find a good catch like this, gives me a little hope.

            Who knows, maybe even the Chinese and Taiwanese (with a little American investment) tools will get to be as good as "Mom's Apple Pie" tools. Japan has certainly turned around its stigma it had in the 60's as something to be avoided.

            The Snap-On stuff - much like Ginger is for the photo - op; looks good under the scrutiny of the cameras on pit row etc, but the Mary Ann model will certainly get the job done!
            Besides, I like pony tails...
            Phil
            Tools Rule

            Comment


            • #7
              Boat? What Boat...

              Originally posted by TOD
              Depends how big is Mary Anns boat?

              You know, in my Mary Ann fantasy, she has a pond on the back part of the farm to raise fish. The Boat? - not much more than a rowboat just to tend the fish she's raising...
              But, I'm conflicted about her with a red n white parasol watching her big "yard ape" honey feed the fish as she giggles and teases him
              or
              She feeds the fish in a bikini.........................
              What boat....

              OTOH,
              Ginger has a limo and a chauffeur...nahhh
              Phil
              Tools Rule

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hewood
                Snob...no way. I've got or have had Craftsman, Delta, GI, Grizzly, Ridgid, HF, Homier, PC, Milwaukee, Freud, Makita, Incra, Stanley, Forrest, dollar store stuff...you name it.
                You know, my wife was teasing me because I found a rake I liked at an H.E.B. food store while grocery shopping... Looks real funny tooling around with tools sticking out of your grocery cart.

                Hey, they're trying to be a well-rounded store the sell WD-40 AND Pam cooking spray, Pennzoil AND Olive Oil (BTW - Pam works great sprayed under the mower deck to keep the clippings fom sticking!!)
                Phil
                Tools Rule

                Comment


                • #9
                  A little of both.

                  For tools I know I will keep and use forever, I buy good stuff. Over the years I've replaced an odd assortment of mechanics hand tools with Craftsman. I know it isn't the best, but it has the best warranty and there's a shop a mile down the road.

                  Power tools? Well, working for Rockwell, I tended to get all Delta and Porter-Cable stuff. Not because I wouldn't settle for less, but because I knew it would last forever. Battery tools have been an assortment of Skil, RIDGID (made by Skil at the time) and Ryobi.

                  Specialty tools almost require that they be top quality because there aren't many options. Special tools for cars, electronics, etc.

                  Plumbing tools? Ummmm...all RIDGID!

                  Otehr stuff is an assortment. Craftsman Pro stationary compressor and P-C pancake compressor with P-C nailers and Harbor Freight for the rest of the air tools. Shop stuff is an assortment, but for the garage and woodworking. Good stuff, and whatever gets the job done.

                  Which leads me to a story... My dad and his dad taught woodworking in high school back when it was a respected class, and the projects were heirlooms (we still have several pieces of both their furniture in the house) but my dad is cheap. I had just bought a box of Jorgensen clamps, and was showing them to him. Next time I was at his house, he showed me his HF version he'd picked up. A half dozen cost about what one of mine did. As he took one off the shelf, the pin holding hte head fell out and the head fell off. I stood there stifling a laugh, knowing he was perterbed, and that even with his junky HF tools he could build stuff of a quality I've never remotely approached.

                  So, it isn't the tools, but what you do with them. Buying expensive tools just to have them, serves no purpose other than inflating an ego...

                  My $0.02
                  Steve
                  Steve
                  www.MorrisGarage.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PhilG.
                    ... Hey, they're trying to be a well-rounded store the sell WD-40 AND Pam cooking spray, Pennzoil AND Olive Oil (BTW - Pam works great sprayed under the mower deck to keep the clippings fom sticking!!)
                    ....just don't try the WD-40 or the Pennzoil on your griddle!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Motto

                      Originally posted by smorris
                      Which leads me to a story... My dad and his dad taught woodworking in high school back when it was a respected class, and the projects were heirlooms (we still have several pieces of both their furniture in the house) but my dad is cheap. I had just bought a box of Jorgensen clamps, and was showing them to him. Next time I was at his house, he showed me his HF version he'd picked up. A half dozen cost about what one of mine did. As he took one off the shelf, the pin holding hte head fell out and the head fell off. I stood there stifling a laugh, knowing he was perterbed, and that even with his junky HF tools he could build stuff of a quality I've never remotely approached.

                      So, it isn't the tools, but what you do with them. Buying expensive tools just to have them, serves no purpose other than inflating an ego...
                      your dad was a craftsman in the original sense of the word.

                      "a poor craftsman blames his tools..."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am with heywood and BD. I have all brands and grades of tools. The ones I use for my work are all top of the line, dependable no matter what. Ridgid, milwaukee and such. For home and hobby it depends on the expected use as dave said. I have Ridgid for all my main stationary tools but also have Ryobi for most of my cordless. Corded are dewalt, Ridgid, PC, Milwaukee, Bosch. My mian plumbing tools are all Ridgid. For work I sometimes need something VERY large and I have Aluminum handled pipe wrenches from Harbor frieght for that purpose. 24", 36", and 48". Not used very often and could not afford a major brand of them. My Ridgid pipe wrenches are 2 of each 6", 12" and 18" and these are the ones that get used on a regular basis.
                        info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                        • #13
                          I have just one rule for all my tools....they have to be American made. No Chinese junk. That includes all hand tools.....power tools are a different story since all the best makes in cordless seem to either be Makita or Dewalt or even Milwaukee which aint made in Milwaukee anymore. But far as hand tools, wrenches, sockets, etc, it's either snap-on, proto or craftsman. Occasionally, on some specialty tool like say a basin wrench or a spud wrench, I'll use a chinese made one since there's really no difference anyway and I don't use them that much. But for everyday stuff, it's American or nothing. Most of my plumbing tools are older Ridgid stuff.

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                          • #14
                            Not Really

                            Own and prefer to use Hitachi nailers, skil wormdrives, and milwaukee sawzalls. For most other tools not so picky.

                            Tool snob, not really, just want a tool that I can depend on and maybe a ridgid one of these days.
                            Last edited by tkholck; 04-08-2006, 04:00 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AZPlumber
                              I have just one rule for all my tools....they have to be American made. No Chinese junk. That includes all hand tools.....power tools are a different story since all the best makes in cordless seem to either be Makita or Dewalt or even Milwaukee which aint made in Milwaukee anymore. But far as hand tools, wrenches, sockets, etc, it's either snap-on, proto or craftsman. Occasionally, on some specialty tool like say a basin wrench or a spud wrench, I'll use a chinese made one since there's really no difference anyway and I don't use them that much. But for everyday stuff, it's American or nothing. Most of my plumbing tools are older Ridgid stuff.

                              Hey AZ...,
                              MY basin wrench is a RIDGID 1017 - (I think these are lifetime warranty too)!
                              All kidding aside, I definitely like to stay with domestic brands, but occasionally I get stuck with overseas stuff.
                              Years ago, I ordered a Northern parts washer and discovered it was a Chinese product. The pump was an American pump. While assembling it, I decided to upgrade all the cheap, non-standard Chinese fasteners with Mom's Apple Pie USA fasteners. Since only the tank and stand appear to be the Chinese pieces (hey, I think they could teach a monkey to weld, so why not a Chinese fellow) I felt pretty good about it. After using it awhile, the American-made pump went out. The pump I replaced it with ended up being a Chinese replacement pump. It has out-lasted the US pump by three times and it was real cheap, too!
                              The funniest part of the story, while washing the unit and leaving it outside to air dry, it got stolen.
                              Phil
                              Tools Rule

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