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  • How cool if Ridgid would listen . . .

    Some companies listen to their customers and some don't. Why Ridgid doesn't is beyond me, especially with a customer base of dedicated, focused customers, many of the professionals.

    I've spent quite a few hours now reading every post on the TS3650. Some date back several years and are valid complaints about things that would be easy for Ridgid to address, but the complaints go on. And on.

    I'd really like to buy the TS, but things like the cheap plastic fence lock-down, the wobbly legs, defective arbor, and the cheap motor make me wary. I'm replacing my 40-yr-old Craftsman contractor's saw, which has no plastic on it, still runs great but is slowly losing ground to corrosion (I live in Hawaii). I can't imagine the plastic parts on the TS3650 lasting more than a few years even if they don't get accidentally bumped, and since EVERY one I have seen in HD demos is already broken, plus there's a posting about a guy whose was broken in the shipping box . . . so why plastic, and why hasn't it been replaced with something less "consumer style?"

    The motor is not a big deal; I'll switch it with the 2 HP Baldor motor on my old saw before I sell it, but the other details are keeping me looking.

    IMHO, Ridgid would sell a LOT more of these (and probalby many other tools, as well) if they would show their commitment to their customers by responding to this awesome forum!

    Maybe if I do buy the TS, I'll just order replacements for the plastic fence parts so I'll have them on hand when they fail. Not the way I like to enter into a relationship with my next major shop tool, but I guess that's life these days.
    Unanswered Questions
    are far less dangerous
    than Unquestioned Answers.

  • #2
    Originally posted by hiloguy
    Some companies listen to their customers and some don't. Why Ridgid doesn't is beyond me, especially with a customer base of dedicated, focused customers, many of the professionals.

    I've spent quite a few hours now reading every post on the TS3650. Some date back several years and are valid complaints about things that would be easy for Ridgid to address, but the complaints go on. And on.

    I'd really like to buy the TS, but things like the cheap plastic fence lock-down, the wobbly legs, defective arbor, and the cheap motor make me wary.................. I can't imagine the plastic parts on the TS3650 lasting more than a few years even if they don't get accidentally bumped, and since EVERY one I have seen in HD demos is already broken, plus there's a posting about a guy whose was broken in the shipping box . . . so why plastic, and why hasn't it been replaced with something less "consumer style?"
    Unfortunately, one of the pitfalls when reading older threads is sometimes an incorrect impression can be reached. The "cheap plastic fence lock-down" is a myth! Awhile back, I started a thread asking actual owners of Ridgid saws to report if any of them had experienced a problem with the lock down mechanism/handle breaking under normal shop conditions. IIRC, nobody reported such a problem although some did receive receive damaged fences from the factory. However, that is more of a materials handling problem then anything else. FWIW, after 3+ years of use, the lock down on my saw operates as well as it did the day I got it.

    While there have been compllaints about the legs being wobbly in some cases, many owners have reported absolutely no problems with the legs being wobbly. Could the supposed wobbly leg situation be nothing more than improper assembly? I don't know, but maybe.

    As far as the arbor problem is concerned, well...... that was addressed by Ridgid and corrected almost a year ago already.

    As far as the motor being "cheap", that is your opinion and you're certainly welcome to it. There hasn't been a large number of threads, that I can remember, complaining about the motor going belly up for me to consider the motor a weak point on the 3650.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would agree with Dave on this one. One should take into account that the products on display in their local HD are going to see a lot of abuse from many things including employees moving stuff around all the time, kids climbing all over them, customer leaning on an inappropriate spot while BSing in the isle, and so forth. I have had my TS3650 for quite some time and have had no problems with the arbor (got mine just after Ridgid corrected the issue), fence lock down works flawlessly, legs never wobbled when assembled correctly, and the motor has never given me any issues once aligned properly. I would not hesitate to recommend the saw at this time. And it has seen its fair share of use and abuse (including a 2-year old running amock at times! ). The only real issue I had was losing the darn key (again, 2-year old in the house... )!!!

      Just my $.02 worth......

      WWS
      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

      Comment


      • #4
        Alright already! I guess I kinda upset you guys and that was very much NOT my intent. Seems sometimes making statements like I did is a good way to get some real info, though. I’ve been scouring the forums on this TS, because I always do some pretty intensive research before committing to things like a major shop tool. It’s not even the money so much as the drama of buying the saw, lovingly setting it up and then finding its flaws later. I’ve had my existing TS for 40 years, and except for some creeping corrosion here and there, it has never broken anything and still looks and functions well.

        My “research,” some of which was done at HD and the rest on this and other Internet sites, indicated the “flaws” I mentioned. The saw on display at our local HD has the bad arbor and the oft-misinformed (uninformed?) employees there indicated that it came from the same original shipment as all of their inventory of this item. Since this HD store is only a year old, logic tells me that all of their inventory has the old arbors.

        The fence lock-down levers are indeed snapped off on both of the demos at our HD, but since there have been no reports of anyone breaking them in normal use, I can laccept that. I’m real easy on my shop equipment anyway.

        Wobbly legs? I’ve heard both sides of the story in about even doses, and the display saw is indeed wobbly. The display saw was also barely assembled, with a lot of fasteners only finger tight (or missing), so I can discount that saw as a viable example. The sheet metal that the legs are stamped out of does seem fairly light-weight, but I’ll go with the “rock solid” feedback from the guys who use their equipment in professional settings.

        The motor, no, I haven’t heard of any smoked motors, but it seemed a red flag that there is no HP rating from Ridgid and that there is no mfgr’s name on the motor, either. But that’s not an issue, as I would use the 2 HP motor on my old saw anyway. From the pics, it appears that it will fit. Whoever buys my old TS will inherit a rand new Ridgid motor.

        The bottom line? Hey, many thanks for your passionate responses to my findings. You convinced me to buy the saw, even it if does have the old arbor. I think that the low spot can be fixed with a careful application of JB Weld. I do use my Freud stack dado often, so it would be nice if that first chipper spun in a circle and not an elipse.

        A suggestion for the Forum: It would have helped me a great deal in making this decision if there had been like a “2006 Update on the TS3650.” That update would have addressed all of the issues that had been corrected by Ridgid, and the other issues that had been brought up a number of times with no apparent resolution. From the beginning, I like the “feel” of the TS3650, its size, height, thoughtful design and general ergonomics. The fence had, from the beginning, seemed really good to me, but then all those forum posts about how the only way to go was a front-locker made me question it. From the posts I've read, I'm not the only one who had felt that "Ridgid doesn't listen."

        Thanks again, guys!

        Hiloguy
        Unanswered Questions
        are far less dangerous
        than Unquestioned Answers.

        Comment


        • #5
          It sounds to me that you did your homework, evaluated the other options, and (in your opinion) picked the best saw for the price. I did the same earlier this year (purchased the TS3650 on 10 Jan 2006). I have seen none of the problems posted, and am very satisfied wit the purchase. The LSA is nice, but in reality it has all the legalese that virtually every other mnfgr has in their's, and that is because a significant amount of greedy lawyers has made it almost impossible to produce any product in the USA without hiring a battery of them.
          I do not agree with you that not posting a horsepower rating shows lack on quality or confidence. Horsepower ratings have become so distorted thru "peak" and "developed" ratings that they are meaningless. Amps, voltage, and rpm give you a truer picture of a motors capacity, and the fact that no "horsepower" rating was on the packaging actually was a plus to me as it meant (to me) that they weren't trying to bulls$$t me on the saw's true capability.
          I have an extensive mechanical background, and you are no novice based on your 6 hour assembly time. Please realize that a lot of the "problems" posted are from people getting into a new field of interest that have limited mechanical experience, and have a lot to learn about the physics and geometry of this tools operation. Their questions are valid, as that is how they will learn, but please don't let new woodworkers difficulties based on lack of experience and education taint your enjoyment of a good tool.
          For the record, I am not anyway associated with Ridgid or Home Depot except as a customer, and I must drive about 50 miles when I do shop at HD. And, even though I bought the saw 10 Jan, I have used it an average of 4 days a week since then and have ripped 3/4" cabinet-grade ply, dadoed, resawed lumber, run molding blades, and built several pieces of furniture during that time.
          Did I get a saw worth the price? Yes. Am I happy with it? Yes. Do I think Ridgid mngmt listens to this forum? Based on the arbor issue, I say Yes. I hope the table flatness and wing alignment issues are being investigated and are dealt with the way the arbor issue was originally (let the user make the decision to fix or take to the repair center and LEAVE THE LAWYERS OUT OF IT).
          my $.02
          P.S. If you live in Hawaii, be glad its made of steel, cast iron and plastic. Those Formosan termites eat everything else!(on second thought, the plastic may not be safe! )Aloha
          Practicing at practical wood working

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks some more!

            Hey I like all this good feedback. I think this forum is awesome in that there are actually some professionals in here who know what they are talking about. I'm a retired general contractor and have built a lot of custom homes (on the Oregon Coast) and I built all of the kitchens in all of them, using my well-worn 40-yr-old Craftsman with a hand-me-down Delta fence. (The guy bought a Biese for his old Delta saw.) If I had a nickel for every time I've set that fence with the measure-thrice method, I'd be one happy haole.

            Re: the motor, I know what you're saying about all the HP hype. But I'm also an old shop guy who has bought a lot of major-mfg motors through the years (like the 2HP Baldor on my old saw) and they don't ( as far as I know!) play stupid consumer games with HP figures. Like Sears does on a regular basis. So what's your impression of the power of the motor? Do you have to slow down when ripping a long, green 2 x something?

            I have heard very few complaints about wing alignment and surface issues. What's up with that? Is is worth doing a bunch more research on? I'm afraid the TS's that are in inventory at our island HD are probably old stock from somewhere.

            I just want this new TS to last as long as my old one . . .

            Re: Hawaii and iron, if I'm not going to be using any tool with an iron table for a few days, I spray it liberally with good old WD40. That's the only way I've found to keep them from rusting overnight here. I also never leave an iron table ucovered when I'm not using the machine. It's also the only downside I've found of living in Hawaii. The salt air is also hard on aluminum and zinc castings, which is what has finally been taking its toll on my old TS. But hey, I get to make furniture out of local Koa, mango, kamani and coconut, and I never have to heat my shop! And I can go jump in the ocean to wash off the sawdust . . .

            Hiloguy
            Unanswered Questions
            are far less dangerous
            than Unquestioned Answers.

            Comment


            • #7
              A new spin on TS3650 quality

              Aloha, Gofor! I just read your unsettling post on the latest Ridgid QC issues:

              "I bought my TS3650 on 10 Jan 2006. Ser # is PO44963271. I had none of the problems with the wings, table flatness, miter slot/saw blade alignment, etc that have popped up in the last month. Ridgid management: I think you have a problem in production that warrants attention. I have been strongly recommending this saw on several forums due to its outstanding quality, and based on feedback, have had a positive impact on peoples decisions to buy this item. But I will be taking a hiatus from that for a while until you get the quality back to where it was when I bought it. I will not compromise my integrity for your laxity in quality control or changes you instituted to make things more profitable at the expense of quality."

              That's some heavy stuff. Now I'm thinking I better get myself down there and pick up one of those old-stock TS's with the bad arbor and the GOOD TABLE and WINGS, and ALIGNMENT! I also just discovered the discount coupon that runs through 5/3/06, so it's time.

              Your take on that?

              Hiloguy
              Unanswered Questions
              are far less dangerous
              than Unquestioned Answers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Based on my experience with it, I highly recommend the saw. I don't think you will find a saw with more power, better accuracy, better fence, and in-shop portability that will run on 120volts. When you get into the strictly 220v, there may be something, but I did not look at them. However, the TS3650 can be wired for 220 if you want.
                My only concern at this time would be the flatness of the table/wings, only based on several posts to this forum. Only one stated the table was definitely not flat, but from his description, it appeared that it was probably a flaw or scratch that had been buffed out at the factory (a one-time thing as opposed to a major production issue). At least two thers cannot seem to get the wings aligned flat to the table. I don't think their problems have been resolved yet, so I don't know if its how the parts were made, drilled, or if the individual is making an error in assy.
                With those thoughts in mind, I would buy the saw, but when unpacking it and checking the inventory, I would first look for damage from packing/shipping, which could happen with any tool of any brand. In addition, I would check the table top and the wings with a straight edge to ensure they are flat (I used a 2' and a 4' machined levels which I knew were flat and straight), and I would check the mating edges of the table and wings with a try-square to make sure they are close to square. If you see any obvious defects, I would put it back in the box and return it to the saw for replacement parts or a new saw before going through 6 hours of set up.
                As for the arbor, the "bad" one is only a problem if you use a stacked dado set. Some have fixed this with JB Weld rather than replacing the arbor. One of teh threads here actually has a picture that shows the difference, which is the length on one screw thread at the flange side.
                Sorry, gotta run. I'll be glad to answer mor equestions later, but my advice is buy it (Especially if you can get a discount!!)
                Practicing at practical wood working

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