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Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

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  • Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

    The R8823 is the 18/24v model
    The R842301 is the 18v model

    The 18v model weighs in without battery or bit at 3lbs
    The 18/24v model weighs in without battery or bit at 3lbs 1 1/2oz

    The 18v model does not incorporate a slick LED light
    the 18/24v model does have the LED light

    The specs of these units do vary:

    the 18v model: 1450 in/lb of torque
    0-3100 blows per minute
    0-2400 rpm no load speed

    Just above the battery is a small clip/loop to attach a clip it's quite handy for me.

    The 18/24v model: 1490in/lb of torque
    18v= 0-2900 blows per minute
    24v= 0-3300 blows per minute
    18v= 0-1700 rpm no load speed nicad battery
    24v= 0-2100 rpm no load speed lithium-ion battery

    No small clip/loop

    The units look quite similar with the exception of some subtle differences:

    18v model: rear of driver is rounded, front is metal, cooling vents on the sides, carry clip and No LED light. The battery area top is not rubber coated just the orange plastic.
    To service the tool the screws are at the front assembly.

    18/24v model Rear of driver is flat with the screws to disassemble the tool for service. No carry clip, it does have the LED light. The LED light comes on when you squeeze the trigger and the motor runs..It would have been nice to have the LED come on prior to the motor running, thus allowing you to line the bit to the screw. The battery area top is rubber coated. The front end is plastic , cooling vents on the top and sides.

    The operation of the impact drivers are exactly the same!

    Differences observed:
    the 18v motor obviously runs at a higher rpm and pitch.
    the 18/24v model runs [using 18v nicad] at slower rpm and lower pitch.
    The speed control trigger on both units operate smoothly.
    Both drivers do their assigned task very well. The 18v unit did drive a 3 1/2" deck screw into a 2x4 faster [well higher rpm]. Both impact functions were exactly the same.

    The impact action is also good but I'm really unable to comment on the differences between the two units. I suspect the 18v model wins again as it provides more blows per minute. The reality though either unit accomplished their task nicely.

    For those of you concerned about "sparking", yes when you stop at full speed you may notice a spark through the vents. This is the braking system working and is normal in this type of motor design. you have the same sparking in the ridgid drills too.

    Finally I find the impact driver excellent when you do pocket hole screws.

    I am pleased with the Ridgid impact driver both the 18v and 18/24v models.

    Cactus Man
    Last edited by cactusman; 10-23-2007, 11:15 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

    Good comparison/review. Thanks. I'd like to see Ridgid come out with a compact impact driver similar to Makita's or DeWalt's new one. Couple that with the 1.5Ah battery and keep it all under 2 and 1/2 pounds and you've got a winner.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

      I want to add some comments regarding the impact driver and "cheap screws"

      We are by now all aware that not all driver bits are created the same. Thus cheap bits will be quickly damaged, bunged up, stripped, ...you pick the word. The cheap bits will also often get stuck in the driver. The consensus is to purchase ACER bits from MCfEELY's or similar bits designed for impact drivers.

      On the other hand. you need to be aware of the screws you are driving. I have experienced frequently the screw head twists off. The breaking of the screws can be viewed from a few angles. First, you are driving them too hard and the torque of the driver is breaking the screw head. This can occur with the 14.4v, 18v, or 24v impact driver.

      Second, you are buying poor grade screws! We all know today that most deck screws or drywall type screws are made in china or other off shore factories. The specifications of these screws are rarely known and we do not know what torque limits they have.

      I notice that what is commonly called zip-screws are more tolerant of the driver and you rarely break them. I guess these screws have thicker shafts etc. For those of you going "HUH?" These are sheet metal screws with hex heads. Typically used for duct work, air conditioning stuff etc.

      If you look at the off the shelf deck screw you'll notice the phillips or pozidrive head is flat but under the head the screw shaft tapers significantly and is thin! The weak point is right under the head of the screw. When you drive the screw and the impact driver goes into the impact mode, after a few hits the screw head will twist off [snap off].

      I have found SPAX screws have a stronger head to shaft design and do not break as often...of course you can still break them when you get carried away.

      So...just be aware of what type screw you're using, the material you're screwing into and use the impact driver gently. I have found that if you start slowly and if the screw immediately bites into the wood you do not need to run the impact driver full speed. You also do not need the driver to go into the impact mode [hammer] for more than one or two impacts. More than that and you may break the head off the screw.

      Now using the impact driver for lag bolts or say 1/4-20 bolts or larger, then you can get more aggressive with the driver. I have yet to "break" the head off a lag or carriage bolt.

      Hope this helps the first time users of any impact type driver tool.

      Cactus Man
      Last edited by cactusman; 01-25-2008, 04:38 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

        Thank you, thank you..... I stood in the local Home Depot for a 1/2 hour tonite trying to figure out what the differences were between the 18 and 18/24 models.

        I've been using a Makita impact for lags, assembly/disassembly of electric panels, deck screws etc and it's been great but w/ 2 crews fighting over it I need to splurge.

        I'm leaning towards Ridgid because of warrantee (and the name). I want the 4 piece kit (really need the sawsall too) but wonder if I'm trading off quality in not getting the dual voltage units? Would the 24 volt battery offer more power/run time?

        Has anyone experience using both types that could weigh in? Any Ridgid salespeople listening that could offer additional input?

        Thanks

        Chris

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

          I have the Ridgid 18 volt impact that came with the nicad five piece set. Great tool, big work saver. I still don't know why Ridgid refuses to market a 1/2" heavy duty impact 18/24 volt gun? You could use such a tool to drive the toughest lags and easily do automotive work such as lug nut removal. DeWalt has such a tool and so do several other manufacturers. We have a good platform with the 18 volt nicad and now lithiums, come on give us that heavy duty 1/2" impact. Please.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

            Originally posted by Unimogr View Post
            Thank you, thank you..... I stood in the local Home Depot for a 1/2 hour tonite trying to figure out what the differences were between the 18 and 18/24 models.

            I've been using a Makita impact for lags, assembly/disassembly of electric panels, deck screws etc and it's been great but w/ 2 crews fighting over it I need to splurge.

            I'm leaning towards Ridgid because of warrantee (and the name). I want the 4 piece kit (really need the sawsall too) but wonder if I'm trading off quality in not getting the dual voltage units? Would the 24 volt battery offer more power/run time?

            Has anyone experience using both types that could weigh in? Any Ridgid salespeople listening that could offer additional input?

            Chris
            Chris...
            We have over 40 Ridgid cordless tools and use them every day in our business of rehabing old houses in this part of the country. We have 14.4V, 18V and 18/24V impact tools which are used extensively as our primary screw drivers. 18/24V impact is much more powerful using the 24V batts and the recip and circ saws absolutely require the 24V batts as they are real power hogs. I will use the 18V batts for lightness when driving smaller screws especially if working overhead.
            We have converted to using star drive bits and screws exclusively as they hook up solid and the bit stays in the screw,solid during the rattling and jumping that occurs with impact tools. It's faster and easier to fit the bit to the screw and the bit lasts longer than philips or square drives....Ray
            Last edited by roadrashray; 05-14-2008, 08:45 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

              I was back at Home Despot tonight looking again. I confirmed the 3 piece kit w/ sawsall, hammerdrill, charger and two batteries had 24 volt batteries vs the 18s.

              Looks like I'll buy that kit and the stand alone impact driver w/out batteries. I can only praise the Makita 12 volt impact we use considering what we've put it through. (it's still driving 6" x 3/8" lags in PT after a years use) Their 18 volt lithium at $200. looks nice but the warrantee Ridgid offers appeals to my Scottish nature and I figure the 24 volt should be superior.


              Regarding a 1/2" impact, I've never used an electric or cordless impact and they probably wouldn't work for me. I had to get a 3/4" impact because my 1/2" 600ft lbs pneumatic just wouldn't break free some of the bolts I deal with.

              Chris
              Last edited by Unimogr; 05-14-2008, 08:47 PM. Reason: Forgot to sign it...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

                Originally posted by Unimogr View Post
                I was back at Home Despot tonight looking again. I confirmed the 3 piece kit w/ sawsall, hammerdrill, charger and two batteries had 24 volt batteries vs the 18s.

                Looks like I'll buy that kit and the stand alone impact driver w/out batteries. I can only praise the Makita 12 volt impact we use considering what we've put it through. (it's still driving 6" x 3/8" lags in PT after a years use) Their 18 volt lithium at $200. looks nice but the warrantee Ridgid offers appeals to my Scottish nature and I figure the 24 volt should be superior.


                Regarding a 1/2" impact, I've never used an electric or cordless impact and they probably wouldn't work for me. I had to get a 3/4" impact because my 1/2" 600ft lbs pneumatic just wouldn't break free some of the bolts I deal with.

                Chris
                Good choice Chris. The hammer drill is a heavy beast, however it has the power to run 1/2" auger style bits through studs with no sweat. The recip saw is so handy we seldom pull the Milwaukee out of the case any more.
                Good luck...Ray

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

                  Since I do not have large forearms I will say "UNCLE"!!!

                  I had a project that I used the 18/24v impact driver. I had a 2.5AH battery attached.

                  For the record, the tool performed flawlessly and did an outstanding job.

                  the problem I encountered was I ran out of arm! I also found the driver small as it is
                  was still awkward in a few tight places, over my head and sideways!

                  I had an opportunity to try a MAKITA impact driver [I think that was the brand] and it also did an excellent job. The most dramatic difference was the tool was at least 50% lighter and smaller in size. this allowed me to do those awkward positions without losing my arm.

                  I returned the "other driver" to my friend and I still like my Ridgid impact driver.

                  I guess I need to lift weights to build up my arm strength!

                  Cactus Man
                  Last edited by cactusman; 05-31-2008, 10:53 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

                    Originally posted by Unimogr View Post
                    I was back at Home Despot tonight looking again. I confirmed the 3 piece kit w/ sawsall, hammerdrill, charger and two batteries had 24 volt batteries vs the 18s.

                    Looks like I'll buy that kit and the stand alone impact driver w/out batteries. I can only praise the Makita 12 volt impact we use considering what we've put it through. (it's still driving 6" x 3/8" lags in PT after a years use) Their 18 volt lithium at $200. looks nice but the warrantee Ridgid offers appeals to my Scottish nature and I figure the 24 volt should be superior.


                    Regarding a 1/2" impact, I've never used an electric or cordless impact and they probably wouldn't work for me. I had to get a 3/4" impact because my 1/2" 600ft lbs pneumatic just wouldn't break free some of the bolts I deal with.

                    Chris
                    Having done automotive and other work where we used 1/2" impact guns and breaker bars, I can't get over your need for a 3/4" impact and it's power above 600ft lbs. Those are some impressive numbers for people who are not familiar with what you are talking about. I'm curious what bolts you are breaking free and I assume if that 3/4" impact is out of commission those bolts don't move?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Ridgid impact driver 18v VS 18/24v models

                      Originally posted by cactusman View Post
                      Since I do not have large forearms I will say "UNCLE"!!!

                      I had a project that I used the 18/24v impact driver. I had a 2.5AH battery attached.

                      For the record, the tool performed flawlessly and did an outstanding job.

                      the problem I encountered was I ran out of arm! I also found the driver small as it is
                      was still awkward in a few tight places, over my head and sideways!

                      I had an opportunity to try a MAKITA impact driver [I think that was the brand] and it also did an excellent job. The most dramatic difference was the tool was at least 50% lighter and smaller in size. this allowed me to do those awkward positions without losing my arm.

                      I returned the "other driver" to my friend and I still like my Ridgid impact driver.

                      I guess I need to lift weights to build up my arm strength!

                      Cactus Man
                      Yep Cman, using the 18/24V impact with either the 2.5V Nicad or 24V LI can be an arm strainer as both batteries are very heavy. If I'm working overhead or in other locations where weight is an issue I reach for the 1.5Ah LI battery. The shortcoming is that the power is much less, however in most cases it just means you must be patient while the tool rattles the screw in. It's either that or turn the job over to one of young "strong arms".

                      Comment

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