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  • Better off with cheep cordless drills

    In the past 3 years I've purchased 3 X2 12v, 1 14v (home owner grade) and 2 18v X2 cordless drills. I'm a swimming pool installer so the guns are exposed to sand and dirt 6 days a week and the occasional rain. The 12v's developed a screech early and have lost speed/torque, the 14v died in under 4 months and didn't seem it was worth getting serviced. 1 18v trigger broke and the others motor burned out. The Ridgids have held up better the most other manufactures. 18v Dewalt felt like it was getting twisted apart driving 1/2 inch screws into predrilled holes till the battery exploded in the gun. The one 14v Hitachi I own works great so far but the charger went out (in for service also).

    So finally to the question. Has anyone had better luck with any other manufactures? Is there anything I can do to clean/slow wear on the motor besides blowing it out with a air compressor? Or does any contractor just buy Ryobi's and scrap them every year and save the headache and possibly $ over buying/servicing higher end guns?

  • #2
    Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

    Originally posted by bnlab View Post
    In the past 3 years I've purchased 3 X2 12v, 1 14v (home owner grade) and 2 18v X2 cordless drills. I'm a swimming pool installer so the guns are exposed to sand and dirt 6 days a week and the occasional rain. The 12v's developed a screech early and have lost speed/torque, the 14v died in under 4 months and didn't seem it was worth getting serviced. 1 18v trigger broke and the others motor burned out. The Ridgids have held up better the most other manufactures. 18v Dewalt felt like it was getting twisted apart driving 1/2 inch screws into predrilled holes till the battery exploded in the gun. The one 14v Hitachi I own works great so far but the charger went out (in for service also).

    So finally to the question. Has anyone had better luck with any other manufactures? Is there anything I can do to clean/slow wear on the motor besides blowing it out with a air compressor? Or does any contractor just buy Ryobi's and scrap them every year and save the headache and possibly $ over buying/servicing higher end guns?
    We do alot of old house rehab and our tools are abused by rotted wood, plaster, concrete dust, and drywall debri. I just blow them out with compressed air. We started using Ridgid cordless tools in early 07' and currently have over 40 tools. They have held up very well.
    We have used a few less expensive tools in the past such as Black and Decker and Ryobi and they didn't last well under the abuse we provide. We have used Makita and DeWalt in the past and their performance was generally acceptable however Ridgid's Lifetime Service Agreement was a strong selling point for us. Hopefully that program will be well suported as our tools reach the point where service will be necessary. Stay tuned!...Ray

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    • #3
      Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

      Although I own mostly RIDGID tools (miter saw, recipricating saw, orbital sander, circular saw and pressure washer) I am also totally sold on Ryobi. My two 18v drills are Ryobi and I don' think I'd ever buy another kind of cordless drill. Great bang for the buck.

      One is a hammer drill that I bought back in 03' and I have used the heck out of it (not prefessionally). I've dropped it off of my 10' step ladder onto concrete twice and although the 2nd gear made some unhealthy sounds for a bit after that, it works in every speed and never did crack the housing. It has never lost an ounce of the ton of torque it has. The other is Ryobi's Lithium 18v that I got a few months ago... I got tired of hanging sheet rock and picture frames with a heavy hammer drill. : ) I haven't had much time to abuse the new one but so far it works great. Lithium is the only way to go.

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      • #4
        Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

        Originally posted by simchamp View Post
        Although I own mostly RIDGID tools (miter saw, recipricating saw, orbital sander, circular saw and pressure washer) I am also totally sold on Ryobi. My two 18v drills are Ryobi and I don' think I'd ever buy another kind of cordless drill. Great bang for the buck.

        One is a hammer drill that I bought back in 03' and I have used the heck out of it (not prefessionally). I've dropped it off of my 10' step ladder onto concrete twice and although the 2nd gear made some unhealthy sounds for a bit after that, it works in every speed and never did crack the housing. It has never lost an ounce of the ton of torque it has. The other is Ryobi's Lithium 18v that I got a few months ago... I got tired of hanging sheet rock and picture frames with a heavy hammer drill. : ) I haven't had much time to abuse the new one but so far it works great. Lithium is the only way to go.
        My Ryobi cordless drill and spiral saw have both taken 6' tumbles from my ladder a couple of times. Popped back in the battery and they were no worse for it.

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        • #5
          Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

          After smacking an 18 v Dewalt to pieces from repeatedly dropping it off a 10' step ladder to the slab when I was doing commercial, I decided it best to just buy a cheap drill and accept the fact that I'd be replacing it often...I got an 18 v Ryobi.

          At the time it was $50, the Dewalt was somewhere around $250.
          I haven't gone back, Ryobi's will usually last me 2 to 3 years, and I beat the life outta them...I drill joists & studs every chance I get rather than drag out the right angle, unless there's too much drilling for the batteries to handle.

          The two big problems I have with Ryobi -

          -The batteries don't last long, maybe eight to ten months a pop...but they're 2 for $40 compared to Dewalts $50+ for one.
          The LI batteries I have yet to try...dying to hear some input.

          -The chuck...it loosens after awhile, thats always a good time when I watch my phillips bit drop to the ground as I hold it high into a hard to reach spot.

          All around, I won't change to another cordless set until either Dewalt makes a 36 v set thats made of freaking metal & I won't have to take out a loan to buy.
          Or someone else does....Milwaukee's V-28 got my attention, but they were said to have wiring issues, so I backed away...not to mention the price was also a bit extreme.
          I see more and more Ryobi's on job sites now...fewer Dewalt.

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          • #6
            Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

            Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
            After smacking an 18 v Dewalt to pieces from repeatedly dropping it off a 10' step ladder to the slab when I was doing commercial, I decided it best to just buy a cheap drill and accept the fact that I'd be replacing it often...I got an 18 v Ryobi.

            At the time it was $50, the Dewalt was somewhere around $250.
            I haven't gone back, Ryobi's will usually last me 2 to 3 years, and I beat the life outta them...I drill joists & studs every chance I get rather than drag out the right angle, unless there's too much drilling for the batteries to handle.

            The two big problems I have with Ryobi -

            -The batteries don't last long, maybe eight to ten months a pop...but they're 2 for $40 compared to Dewalts $50+ for one.
            The LI batteries I have yet to try...dying to hear some input.

            -The chuck...it loosens after awhile, thats always a good time when I watch my phillips bit drop to the ground as I hold it high into a hard to reach spot.

            All around, I won't change to another cordless set until either Dewalt makes a 36 v set thats made of freaking metal & I won't have to take out a loan to buy.
            Or someone else does....Milwaukee's V-28 got my attention, but they were said to have wiring issues, so I backed away...not to mention the price was also a bit extreme.
            I see more and more Ryobi's on job sites now...fewer Dewalt.
            Ryobi has a cheap 18V RA drill. I don't have a real RA drill to compare it to, but the form factor is easier to deal with joists than the regular drill.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

              Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
              After smacking an 18 v Dewalt to pieces from repeatedly dropping it off a 10' step ladder to the slab when I was doing commercial, I decided it best to just buy a cheap drill and accept the fact that I'd be replacing it often...I got an 18 v Ryobi.

              At the time it was $50, the Dewalt was somewhere around $250.
              I haven't gone back, Ryobi's will usually last me 2 to 3 years, and I beat the life outta them...I drill joists & studs every chance I get rather than drag out the right angle, unless there's too much drilling for the batteries to handle.

              The two big problems I have with Ryobi -

              -The batteries don't last long, maybe eight to ten months a pop...but they're 2 for $40 compared to Dewalts $50+ for one.
              The LI batteries I have yet to try...dying to hear some input.

              -The chuck...it loosens after awhile, thats always a good time when I watch my phillips bit drop to the ground as I hold it high into a hard to reach spot.

              All around, I won't change to another cordless set until either Dewalt makes a 36 v set thats made of freaking metal & I won't have to take out a loan to buy.
              Or someone else does....Milwaukee's V-28 got my attention, but they were said to have wiring issues, so I backed away...not to mention the price was also a bit extreme.
              I see more and more Ryobi's on job sites now...fewer Dewalt.
              I've heard the same thing from other guys - the Ryobi is a nice disposable drill if things are prone to getting dropped. I'm a casual user, and I have the V28 Milwaukee set which is more than enough, sometimes way too big for the spot I'm in. Picked up the Ridgid compact drill as a way to get some compact lithium batteries for some MaxSelect tools - ended up LOVING the compact Ridgid drill. Very nice, light, lots of power. Plus the LED light is a bonus.
              I'm on "The List" and I love it!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

                I bought the Ryobi 18volt lithium drill with tool light a few months ago and the lithium batteries make a world of difference to their tools. In my opinion Ryobi nicads were always their weakest link, not that they are heavy duty tools to begin with but man put in a lithium and they are great. My only question is how long will the lithiums last? Will I get four or five years out of them? If they hold up that long then they were worth the money and in return I get longer run times, no memory and full power throughout the charge. Regarding the Ryobi 18volt RA drill, I have not used it but I do have the Ridgid 12volt RA impact which is very nice except for the weak batteries. If you are going to drill through 2x4's and need a RA drill I would go for the Milwaukee hands down, they seem to last a real long time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

                  buy hilti
                  9/11/01, never forget.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

                    Originally posted by cpw View Post
                    Ryobi has a cheap 18V RA drill. I don't have a real RA drill to compare it to, but the form factor is easier to deal with joists than the regular drill.
                    Had it in my hand the other day, but I hadn't known at the time that the LI batteries were compatible with all the "one" tools...it's the same price as the regular drill.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Better off with cheep cordless drills

                      My old One+ circular saw works really well now with the lithium battery. It broke down two pallets of 1/2 inch OSB on three lithium batteries. It went full power until the batteries were dead. With the NiCd batteries, forget it.

                      I have alot of Ryobi cordless tools and gadgets. Some are five years old or more. My oldest drill is just now beginning to burn up. It does full duty stirring paint or on a weeding auger. The Ryobi's do quite well for me as "throw downs" when I help friends w/ projects and we have to outfit " the crew". I did not really plan on buying the new green drill but it was the best way to get two batteries and a charger since HD had that buy "x" save "y" deal. I have five lithium batteries now and I use them primarily for the lawn and garden gadgets, which is great because they will now run for longer than a minute.

                      I save my Makita compacts and Bosch lithium drivers for me in my wood shop. They are my "expensive" cordless tools even though they were all at or below the $200 mark.

                      And about the chucks: I replaced the chuck on my Makita with a Jacobs Soft Grip, and put the Jacobs from the Makita on the green Ryobi. Years ago I replaced the chuck on the Ryobi 3 spd hammer drill with a Jacobs and it did much better. Its worth the extra money because the Jacobs chucks should outlast the Ryobi's and they can go on the next drill.

                      Ern

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