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Building a better threader.

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  • Building a better threader.

    I'd like to gather peoples thoughts on how they would improve upon the Ridgid 300 and other threaders. I spend alot of time running these machines and though the 300 is a pretty solid machine, I think a few changes might be in order. We have a number of rebuilt machines at work and they all seem to have an aluminum wheel on the vice. Any weight savings are only marginal and they do not clamp down on the pipe very well at all. The iron ones are far superior. I would also like to see Ridgid come up with a more secure way to connect the handle for the carridge to the machine. The original piece that slides over the arm usually breaks within the first few months and is replaced with a beam clamp. The eye bolts underneath the carridge break easily as well. I just wanted to get some ideas and maybe see some modifications that have worked for you.

  • #2
    Re: Building a better threader.

    ...replaced with a beam clamp.
    You are right. Seen (and had to use) this many times on the job. I wonder if the guys running the machine had some "skin in the game" (ie, treated the tool like they had paid for it) if they would be so rough.

    Some of the problem might be design, but I'd bet a lot of it has to do with how the tool is used or abused, at least for this one issue. I've seem guys who are kind to their tools and those who just flat out abuse them. Most times the latter is from either someone who just doesn't care or thinks they are too busy to use the tool with the respect it deserves, or by the kid who gets stuck locking up the tools at the end of the day, or from not being careful when loading/unloading from the truck.

    I agree with you on the iron slidewheel being better than the Al ones from the standpoint of better grip on the pipe due to the extra weight making it easier to lock the jaws.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006


    Time, cost, or quality; pick any two but you can't have all three.