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  • #16
    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
    dog, we're both the same age, and i would assume we both had to learn the metric system in school. although we (the usa) never really converted to the metric system, except the auto industry. the metric system is much faster and easier to use. everything is basically a system of 10's. no fractions or common denominators to work with.

    i would think that the metric system was used on the space shuttles.

    i just bought a new gps system for my truck. i set it to read in miles and feet.everything converted but i couldn't get the elevation or accuracy to read in feet. it only registered in meters. after contacting the customer service for help, they informed me that the gps is reading the info sent from the satellites. these satellites are usa built. they send out metric readings.

    so now i have to convert 1 meter = 39.37''

    rick.
    Rick,

    Being my age you should know that the Space Shuttles never went to the moon.

    Jeeze,

    Where's Bob D. when you need him. He's usually the one who corrects all of us with the facts.
    the dog

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by RiR View Post
      Don't get me wrong Plumb Dog! I'm not disputing American precision, far from it. You should see how much American tools etc. I've got in my shop, for high precision, & 24/7 use! What I mean is that for a little guy like me, it's easier to work high precision using metric, especially as I grew up in it. The formula's are somewhat simpler in metric also. Hej Appolo was fantastic, and nobody's equalled it yet, but being used to metric, I'd be inclined to say that Appolo was even greater, because they had to "fight" with inches & pounds. That makes the acheivement even greater in my book! and hey, not much computer either, so I'm close to breaking out in a cold sweat jyst thinking about it!
      As regards inches & pipes, if you have a 1/4" thread, Brit, then this is 12.3mm. Likewise, 1" Thread Brit = 38mm. You kan find a written conversion, but I can't seem to find any sort of system in it. I'm aware that the "good guys" in the USA say 1" = 25.4mm, just like I learned, but I 'm puzzled about how the Brit Witch/Pipe, inch system works?
      RiR,

      No offense taken buddy. It's just that the US has taken alot of hits lately (and in my opinion, rightly so). We have got a few things right over the last hundred years, and I think the moon trip was one.

      But, this is a plumbing forum, and I like your imput. So let's get back to plumb ing.

      I ran a new factory building project a few years ago. It was being built in Los Angeles but was owned by a Japanese firm. Talk about confusing: the plans were all metric, but the material specified was all American.

      As to you confusion on British/American pipe, it has come up here before. British use a different sizing and thread-per-inch. It has never been resolved on this forum (as far as I know), because I don't think there are any British plumbers who are members (if I'm wrong.. please respond).

      I will check through my library for a reference, and will post if I find it.

      Please continue to be involved.
      the dog

      Comment


      • #18
        "Where's Bob D. when you need him. "

        Working OT making money Dog. We've got three huge new turbo air compressors we are finishing up installation on and going through startup and testing. I haven't looked close at the specs of the beasts (been busy working on the controls) but they are something like 1200 HP motors driving the compressors (you could probably run a HVLP sprayer AND a 1/2" impact wrench off one of these babies at the same time ).

        NASA uses the metric system in their specs and drawings and almost all communications concerning measurement of volume, length, etc.

        as to British Std Thread for pipe and bolting material, it's easiest to just pass on the links below. The discrepiency in conversion from 1" BSP = 33.7 mm and the US imperial 1" = 25.4mm is because the BSP 1" no longer has the relation to pipe ID or OD that US Imperial pipe sizes do. See the wiki for the full story.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...rd_pipe_thread

        And just to round it out here's the link to our system in the US:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_pipe_thread
        Last edited by Bob D.; 11-30-2006, 10:40 PM.
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
        ---------------
        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
        ---------
        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
          "Where's Bob D. when you need him. "

          Working OT making money Dog. We've got three huge new turbo air compressors we are finishing up installation on and going through startup and testing. I haven't looked close at the specs of the beasts (been busy working on the controls) but they are something like 1200 HP motors driving the compressors (you could probably run a HVLP sprayer AND a 1/2" impact wrench off one of these babies at the same time ).

          NASA uses the metric system in their specs and drawings and almost all communications concerning measurement of volume, length, etc.

          as to British Std Thread for pipe and bolting material, it's easiest to just pass on the links below. The discrepiency in conversion from 1" BSP = 33.7 mm and the US imperial 1" = 25.4mm is because the BSP 1" no longer has the relation to pipe ID or OD that US Imperial pipe sizes do. See the wiki for the full story.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...rd_pipe_thread

          And just to round it out here's the link to our system in the US:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_pipe_thread


          Thanks for your always informed research and opinion Bob.

          Just as a footnote, My best friend was a drafting intern at Rockwell (now defunct), who built the original shuttles. We grew up a few miles from that plant. This was back in the late 70's, early 80's. He told me that all measurements were in inches. Not feet and inches, but inches.

          I'm sure it's changed by now.
          the dog

          Comment


          • #20
            dog, never said the space shuttle went to the moon. i did say that the space shuttle probably used metric measurements. just as i said the gps of mine reads the measurements directly from the usa built satellites in meters.

            just ask bob


            [quote=Bob D.;63307]
            NASA uses the metric system in their specs and drawings and almost all communications concerning measurement of volume, length, etc.


            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #21
              A big thanks to you Bob D! I appreciate you taking time to do the research, and come up with a comprehensive answer.

              Comment


              • #22
                "He told me that all measurements were in inches."

                Hey Dog. I am not doubting you but it is strange is it not?

                I remember being fed that pack of lies about everything going metric when I was in school too (60s and 70s). "You need to learn this stuff because in 10 years that is all we will be using here in the US" they tried to tell us. I would guess they used decimal inches and not fractional inches on the Shuttle. The Feds were supposed to be leading the transition to using the metric system back then by requiring everything and everyone doing business with them to use the metric system. It never did happen.

                The resistance to changing probably has more to do with the American public wanting to maintain their individuality than anything else. My kids didn't learn squat about the metric system in grade school, at least not as much as we did. Seems it has fallen off the radar. They probably had to cut it so no one would be left behind
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                  "He told me that all measurements were in inches."

                  Hey Dog. I am not doubting you but it is strange is it not?

                  I remember being fed that pack of lies about everything going metric when I was in school too (60s and 70s). "You need to learn this stuff because in 10 years that is all we will be using here in the US" they tried to tell us. I would guess they used decimal inches and not fractional inches on the Shuttle. The Feds were supposed to be leading the transition to using the metric system back then by requiring everything and everyone doing business with them to use the metric system. It never did happen.

                  The resistance to changing probably has more to do with the American public wanting to maintain their individuality than anything else. My kids didn't learn squat about the metric system in grade school, at least not as much as we did. Seems it has fallen off the radar. They probably had to cut it so no one would be left behind
                  What he told me was that everything was in inches (not decimal inches, but inches). I agree, I was astounded, because at the time I was in high school, and we were bing told that metric was the wave of the future.

                  I'll give him a call and see if he can post for himself.
                  the dog

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    It gets even more confusing when you start to talk about motorcycles. The general description is a bike is American or it is Metric depending on where it is made but based on the fasteners used to build it. I ride Victory motorcycles which are built in the United States with the highest percentage of American parts. However, all of the fasteners are metric so no one seems to know what to call Victorys.

                    Mark

                    BTW: I too was told in school that everything was switching to metric.
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Mark, nice to see you back in here. It's been a while since I saw a post from you.
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Thanks Bob it is nice to be missed.

                        I have been real busy with work this year. So far this year I have over 200-days working out-of-State.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          All bow to the mighty power of the USA. I'm basking in its glory as we speak.

                          The only reason the US hasn't switched to the metric system is because of the cost of converting. Since they're a major economic power they call the shots in N.America. In school I was taught both systems of measurement, and i'll say without bias metric is easier, more efficient and just makes more sense .I will say though that to have to convert to, and understand a system different than the one you've been using your whole life would be a major inconvenience. But dont mistake inconvenience for an inferior system
                          West Trail Mechanical Ltd
                          Service. Commitment. Expertise.

                          www.westtrailmechanical.ca

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            "i'll say without bias metric is easier, more efficient and just makes more sense"

                            Gotta agree with you, metric is easier to work with once you know it.
                            It's a darn shame we are not there yet...maybe in another 50 years
                            ---------------
                            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                            ---------------
                            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                            ---------
                            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                            ---------
                            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              one of the major factors with converting over to metric, is that there is not a direct replacement to the materials we already use.

                              for instance, a 2x4 wood stud is the basic building dimension for framing of walls. a metric equilvilent is not out there. 2''x 4'' is approx. 50mm x 100mm. that is a true 2'' x 4'', not 1.5'' x 3.5''. just look at the old homes and see the difference. copper tubing and steel pipe along with all the other plumbing materials will not swap over. look at the difference between 3/8'' o.d. copper and 10mm. tubing when connecting faucets. close, but no cigar.

                              the issue is not just thinking metric, it's converting our entire inventory of products to a new size. shoes are one thing, but a direct replacement is another.

                              just my look at it.

                              by the way, metric is a simple system to use.everything is a multiple of 10's too bad we can't convert.

                              rick.
                              phoebe it is

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                                one of the major factors with converting over to metric, is that there is not a direct replacement to the materials we already use.

                                for instance, a 2x4 wood stud is the basic building dimension for framing of walls. a metric equilvilent is not out there. 2''x 4'' is approx. 50mm x 100mm. that is a true 2'' x 4'', not 1.5'' x 3.5''. just look at the old homes and see the difference. copper tubing and steel pipe along with all the other plumbing materials will not swap over. look at the difference between 3/8'' o.d. copper and 10mm. tubing when connecting faucets. close, but no cigar.

                                the issue is not just thinking metric, it's converting our entire inventory of products to a new size. shoes are one thing, but a direct replacement is another.

                                just my look at it.

                                by the way, metric is a simple system to use.everything is a multiple of 10's too bad we can't convert.

                                rick.
                                But,

                                A 2" X 4" is not that, but about 1-5/8" X 3-5/8". What we deal with in construction is "nominal size". For another example: a 1" IPS pipe is neither 1" ID or OD.

                                Therefore, I agree with Rick. It comes down to changing our material. I am framiliar with metric and our system, and I don't have a problem with either.

                                Where I differ is this: I don't see some major reason to change. I don't have a problem with using the current system.
                                the dog

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