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  • Plumbing Math

    I`v been in and out of the field for many years so I thought I might need to take a curse in plumbing to wake up a few old dead brain cells. I passed the first 2 test with 80`s on both test but this plumbing math is killing me ...lol...
    http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

  • #2
    Originally posted by All Clear Sewer View Post
    I`v been in and out of the field for many years so I thought I might need to take a curse in plumbing to wake up a few old dead brain cells. I passed the first 2 test with 80`s on both test but this plumbing math is killing me ...lol...
    didn't know we used 80's in plumbing thought 90's, 72's 60's, 45's, 22.5's were the standard.

    a 90 would be better, but a 80 is better than a 72.

    i need help with the spelling and typing skills. math comes easy $$$

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      It could be worse. Try throwing the metric system in there to help confuse things. Now we're talking fun
      You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

      By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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      • #4
        is this all over canada that we're being taught and tested everything in metric and imperial...or just the alberta boys?
        West Trail Mechanical Ltd
        Service. Commitment. Expertise.

        www.westtrailmechanical.ca

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        • #5
          I think its national. I had an apprentice from BC and he said it was the same there. The Interprovicial (Red Seal) has questions/answers in both standard and metric. Our provncial gas code has both as does the NPC.
          You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

          By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

          Comment


          • #6
            On this test it has everything even the metric system

            I`m gonna work on the third part (Math) before I take that part of the test....lmao

            I dont want anymore of them 80`s even if they are passing
            http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              A bit of math help

              A.C. Sewer, I feel your pain.

              I am a high school math teacher and I'd love to help you out if I could. The only thing I can offer at this time is a very good website that my students use occasionally when they need a little "freshening up" with math topics.

              the link is: http://www.math.com/homeworkhelp/EverydayMath.html

              I hope this helps a bit. Good luck on your exams.

              C. Parker

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              • #8
                To anyone who wants to understand math, and didn't get it in high school, I would recommend: "Mathematics for the Million" by Lancelot Hogben.

                This book was written in 1937, but is still relavent in this day and age. He follows the history of math, and shows the practical applications. It is written in an entertaining manner.

                Available in paperback.
                the dog

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the link, I`ll check it out.
                  http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Passed with a 95% I only missed 1
                    http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

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                    • #11
                      OK, Guys, I'll just say that if you've done your "Master Craftsman" in Denmark, Then metric is the way, and you realise how you could make 3 Mescherschmits 109, in the same time as 1 Spitfire, even though the Me 109 had Fuel injection, and a few other details that should have taken more time!
                      Correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to see that in the US system , then 1 inch is 25.4 mm, which is fine untill one starts with 1/32 - 1/64 , quite normal tollerances in stainless, even on things 25 - 60 meters long!
                      What throws me, and gets me converting everything into metric, before I even fetch the pipe, is the Brit system, 1/4" = 12.3mm, 1" = 38mm?
                      If some of you lads could explain this to me, in a way I can understand, then I would appreciate it! If I can't understand it, then explain annyway, because I'm sure It's entertaining, as are many things British.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RiR View Post
                        OK, Guys, I'll just say that if you've done your "Master Craftsman" in Denmark, Then metric is the way, and you realise how you could make 3 Mescherschmits 109, in the same time as 1 Spitfire, even though the Me 109 had Fuel injection, and a few other details that should have taken more time!
                        Correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to see that in the US system , then 1 inch is 25.4 mm, which is fine untill one starts with 1/32 - 1/64 , quite normal tollerances in stainless, even on things 25 - 60 meters long!
                        What throws me, and gets me converting everything into metric, before I even fetch the pipe, is the Brit system, 1/4" = 12.3mm, 1" = 38mm?
                        If some of you lads could explain this to me, in a way I can understand, then I would appreciate it! If I can't understand it, then explain annyway, because I'm sure It's entertaining, as are many things British.
                        I may be reading your post wrong, but you seem to be saying that the metric system is more precision. May I remind you that one country has put a man on the moon. That would be the United States, with our out-dated measurement system. And for sophistication, I would assume an Apollo spacecraft takes more engineering than a German WWII aircraft.

                        But, regardless, math formulas work under any system.
                        the dog

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RiR View Post
                          1/4" = 12.3mm, 1" = 38mm?
                          If some of you lads could explain this to me
                          I think you are confused? Even the Brits are not that daft! 1/2" is 12.3mm and 1 1/2" is 38mm

                          Originally posted by plumbdog10 View Post
                          May I remind you that one country has put a man on the moon. That would be the United States, with our out-dated measurement system. But, regardless, math formulas work under any system.
                          You could put a 1000 men on the moon and the metric system would still be superior!
                          Last edited by Hondahead; 11-28-2006, 10:40 PM.
                          You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

                          By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            dog, we're both the same age, and i would assume we both had to learn the metric system in school. although we (the usa) never really converted to the metric system, except the auto industry. the metric system is much faster and easier to use. everything is basically a system of 10's. no fractions or common denominators to work with.

                            i would think that the metric system was used on the space shuttles.

                            i just bought a new gps system for my truck. i set it to read in miles and feet.everything converted but i couldn't get the elevation or accuracy to read in feet. it only registered in meters. after contacting the customer service for help, they informed me that the gps is reading the info sent from the satellites. these satellites are usa built. they send out metric readings.

                            so now i have to convert 1 meter = 39.37''

                            rick.
                            phoebe it is

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                            • #15
                              Don't get me wrong Plumb Dog! I'm not disputing American precision, far from it. You should see how much American tools etc. I've got in my shop, for high precision, & 24/7 use! What I mean is that for a little guy like me, it's easier to work high precision using metric, especially as I grew up in it. The formula's are somewhat simpler in metric also. Hej Appolo was fantastic, and nobody's equalled it yet, but being used to metric, I'd be inclined to say that Appolo was even greater, because they had to "fight" with inches & pounds. That makes the acheivement even greater in my book! and hey, not much computer either, so I'm close to breaking out in a cold sweat jyst thinking about it!
                              As regards inches & pipes, if you have a 1/4" thread, Brit, then this is 12.3mm. Likewise, 1" Thread Brit = 38mm. You kan find a written conversion, but I can't seem to find any sort of system in it. I'm aware that the "good guys" in the USA say 1" = 25.4mm, just like I learned, but I 'm puzzled about how the Brit Witch/Pipe, inch system works?

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