Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Flood from overflow Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Flood from overflow

    My toilet overflowed and a plumber snaked, found a clog, and then "adjusted" the flapper. What could cause a fairly large flood (drywall collapsed in part of room underneath bathroom)? I think it must be a combination of the clog and the flapper, since any time i've had a "running" toilet before, the water drains out by itself and does not cause an overflow. Are there multiple possibilities>? Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Flood from overflow

    typically if the toilet is flushed, and is stopped up, it will continue to run until the tank refills. the only damage would be the balance of the water in the tank or from the refill tube. usually not more than a towel or 2 to wipe up.

    if you have an older 1 pc. toilet with a low profile toilet and tank. such as a kohler rialto, it will continue to run if there is a stoppage. the flapper will stay floating since the water level in the tank and bowl are about the same.

    now if you had a running toilet, with a bad flapper, then got a plugged up toilet, you will still have a running toilet

    what brand of toilet and what is the date stamp inside the tank?

    what did the plumber say caused it?

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Flood from overflow

      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      now if you had a running toilet, with a bad flapper, then got a plugged up toilet, you will still have a running toilet
      This was my first thought on reading the question.

      You're right in that normally if you've got a running toilet, it drains itself. I'm not sure you understand though where that water goes.

      A toilet flushes when you dump enough water into it to fill the bottom such that it overflows down the drain with no air pockets. The water going down the drain sucks the water above it down with it, causing the flush. It's all very mechanical and simple.

      If you slowly add water to a toilet, it'll slowly go down the drain without causing the flush. You need enough water to block the air to cause a flush.

      So when you have a running toilet, the water is slowly entering the bowl and then going down the drain. It's not going anywhere else. There is no secondary drain or something.

      So then... if you have a clog in the drain so water can't go down it... and you've got a flapper that's allowing water past it so you've got a running toilet... then that water is going to fill the bowl and spill over onto the floor, causing your flood.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Flood from overflow

        Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
        This was my first thought on reading the question.

        You're right in that normally if you've got a running toilet, it drains itself. I'm not sure you understand though where that water goes.

        A toilet flushes when you dump enough water into it to fill the bottom such that it overflows down the drain with no air pockets. The water going down the drain sucks the water above it down with it, causing the flush. It's all very mechanical and simple.

        If you slowly add water to a toilet, it'll slowly go down the drain without causing the flush. You need enough water to block the air to cause a flush.

        So when you have a running toilet, the water is slowly entering the bowl and then going down the drain. It's not going anywhere else. There is no secondary drain or something.

        So then... if you have a clog in the drain so water can't go down it... and you've got a flapper that's allowing water past it so you've got a running toilet... then that water is going to fill the bowl and spill over onto the floor, causing your flood.


        a toilet has a built in trap. the water level will only get to the level of the weir of the trap. don't care if it's running or flushing. the whole concept of most modern toilets are based on the siphon principle.

        not sure what the rest of your post was getting at

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Flood from overflow

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post


          a toilet has a built in trap. the water level will only get to the level of the weir of the trap. don't care if it's running or flushing. the whole concept of most modern toilets are based on the siphon principle.

          not sure what the rest of your post was getting at

          rick.
          Sorry Rick, my post wasn't for you, it was for the original poster. I just quoted you to expand on what you said.

          Did I do a piss-poor job of explaining how the whole thing works?

          Comment

          Working...
          X