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  • lift station problem?

    Had a call about oder in bathrooms, after there is a rain storm. Checked lift station. Water was down. Float kicked on pump when float switch lifted. checked traps in bathroom, water in them, and have working trap primers .
    Any Ideas?

  • #2
    Re: lift station problem?

    This is personal experience,
    I live in a house built in or before 1906, and plumbing was added in late 1950's any way the first plumbing was "interesting" to say the least, and after time a leak developed in the crawl space under the house, and since the only way under the house at that time was to dig a pit along side of the house and then crawl under from the pit, it was some time to find and then to get it repaired, a large portion of the original DWV was replaced and repaired in late 70's, with ABS,

    But currently No smell when dry, but when we do get a heavy rain (which happened this spring), and if the ground gets damp under the house, the smell comes right back. and as soon as it drys out again no odor,

    If some time in the past they had a spill, and it saturated something, and has got wet again, it could be the problem. and have nothing to do with the plumbing it self.

    IF what I am referring to is the problem, I may be wrong but the only way I know to remove the smell would be to sterilize the materials that were contaminated, or that get wet with the rain,

    In my situation I have been thinking of putting a black light under the house to try to sterilize the soil surface under the house, (it has not seen sun light for over 100 years).
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    • #3
      Re: lift station problem?

      Originally posted by freddy View Post
      Had a call about oder in bathrooms, after there is a rain storm. Checked lift station. Water was down. Float kicked on pump when float switch lifted. checked traps in bathroom, water in them, and have working trap primers .
      Any Ideas?
      When you say "lift station" are we talking about a sump pump or sewer ejector? Sump pumps can take in sewage through an broken line underground and the smell may get worst when the pump is operation during a rainstorm. I had a customer last year call because her sewage ejector never came on but the high water alarm never went off. I checked the pit and found it almost dry. Turns out there was a crack in the bottom of the fiberglass pit and all the sewage was leaching into the soil under her basement.

      It also could be a broken/separated vent line in the wall. Try dropping a few smoke bombs down the roof vents.

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      • #4
        Re: lift station problem?

        Hey guys new here, waiting for my new seesnake micro to arrive

        Not really sure if your talking about a sewage pump or not. Inside or outside

        I have found that the lids never get sealed properly after the guy before you was there, among alot of other possible things. Pepermint oil (old school) or smoke bombs like Plumberscrack (lmao) said.

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        • #5
          Re: lift station problem?

          Welcome to the Forum Drip Leg , APF

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          • #6
            Re: lift station problem?

            Thanks apf

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            • #7
              Re: lift station problem?

              I've encountered buildings where all of the plumbing vent installations appear to be to code and complete, but where unusual terrain shape (house at the bottom of a large hill) and prevailing winds conspired (in some weather conditions) to blow sewer gases back down from above the roof to a bedroom window or even to ground level. Depending on the building roof shape, orientation, and prevailing or even uncommon wind direction, wind blowing at the building can cause downdrafts around a plumbing vent stack, sending normal sewer gases and odors back closer to the ground or even into the building. If your sewer gas odors seem to correlate to windy conditions I'd check this out further. Extending the plumbing vents higher or installing a wind block at the vent top might help.
              "...then there was that dusky gal in Bangkok...real crossway breeder I swear"

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