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  • Toilet Flange Question...

    Okay...here goes. I am remodeling a bathroom and removed the toliet. It's a single story home on a cement slab. The floor in the bathroom was two different heights with the side that the toilette was on being the higher side. The client wanted the higher slab, which was about 1.75" higher, busted out so that the entire bathroom floor will be one height. No problem, busted up the slab and all is level and smooth now. So, now to my question. The toilet flange is now 1.75" above the floor now since the concrete has been removed. I will be installing 1/4" ceramic tile using a 1/4" bed of mortar for a total height of 1/2". Will the flange need to be lowered to sit flush with the tile or will it be ok to leave it at the height it is at now? Will the new toilet sit properly onto the flange and still make contact with the tile floor? Do I need to cut the flange off and lower it? The pipe is OLD cast iron... so I would rather not cut it if it is not absolutely necessary. Just need some professional insight here. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks in advance!
    Nick

  • #2
    Re: Toilet Flange Question...

    nick, the ideal height of the flange is where the lip of the flange is sitting on top of the finish floor/ tile. that would leave approx. the 1/4'' thickness of the flange above the floor.

    in your case with your measurements , it would end up approx. 1.25'' above the floor. or approx. 1'' higher than normal.

    i would remove the present flange while the tile is off. then place some foam wrap around the pipe to keep the mud and tile clear. once the tile is set, you can properly place the new flange on top of the tile and set it perfectly. the excess pipe can be cut off with a internal cutter. of course this is a very special cutter for cast iron and not sure if you can rent it.

    otherwise prior to the finish tile, set it up and use a grinder with a cut off blade. the cast will rust so don't do it prior to the tile.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Toilet Flange Question...

      THANK YOU! I will give this a try. Do you think the old flange is threaded and will simply twist off? Any tricks to try? Or will it have to be cut off and a new flange welded on? The house was built in the 1960's...so it (the flange) has been on there a while...and looks a little rusty to me. If I put too much pressure on it while trying to remove it, will the pipe crack? I just want to be cautious and cover all of my bases. I really do not want to make a mistake and wind up having to bust up the concrete around the pipe to replace it if I crack or break it. Thanks again!
      Nick

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Toilet Flange Question...

        You may want to check and see if the flange is leaded in. Look into the pipe and see if you see lead on the side of the pipe a few inches on the flange piece of pipe. If so to remove stuff rag in pipe and use large hammer to break the old flange off and remove pieces. You can buy differnt sizes of toilet flanges for the height you need. After youi have removed old flange. Set new flange to the new height you need, and then you will need a way to heat lead to re-pour to set this, Not sure if you will have the needed parts and supplies to do this job. May want to have a plumber do this for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Toilet Flange Question...

          Nick,
          I would use my 5" grinder to assist in the breaking away a cast iron closet flange to access the up to 1" thick lead,carefull not to cut too far into the pipe.

          Westcoast likes to drill the lead to loosen it up so the ring can come up in one piece.Maybe this way will be easier for you too.

          Also the insta-set closet ring just sets on the old pipe and then one only tightens down three bolts to secure it(make sure you prep the pipe well).NO RE-LEAD.

          If the cast iron pipe needs to be lowered,again with the grinder and metal cutting wheel and lower it to whatever elevation you need before setting your ring.

          Let us know how it turns out

          Adam

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Toilet Flange Question...

            Nick,

            As Adam posted you need to first remove your existing flange. Be careful not to break your closet bend while you are doing it or you will have to replace that as well. Once the flange is off you will need to cut the top of the closet bend shorter. The best bet will be using an angle grinder. Here is a link to the Insta-set flanges Adam recommended:

            http://www.instantset.com/closet_rings.htm

            Most pros don't even re-lead a joint on a single flange repair anymore.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Toilet Flange Question...

              I still prefer to use lead on flange replacements.
              I would compare it to using CPVC VS Copper. Any one can glue, but sweating
              copper is not for everyone. Plus, If they see me tighten 3 bolts to install a flange they would scream when it finally hits them. WOW, I could've done that. For the prices I charge for a flange change out, leading it in is the only way to go.
              But for a home owner or someone doing it for the first time, the handy man way, is the way to go.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                Originally posted by freddy View Post
                I still prefer to use lead on flange replacements.
                I would compare it to using CPVC VS Copper. Any one can glue, but sweating
                copper is not for everyone. Plus, If they see me tighten 3 bolts to install a flange they would scream when it finally hits them. WOW, I could've done that. For the prices I charge for a flange change out, leading it in is the only way to go.
                But for a home owner or someone doing it for the first time, the handy man way, is the way to go.
                This thought process makes no sense to me.If a home owner wants help changing out a ring this is an easy way for them them.

                Freddy,so all you are trying to do is protect your prices when you give advice?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                  Originally posted by freddy View Post
                  I still prefer to use lead on flange replacements.
                  I would compare it to using CPVC VS Copper. Any one can glue, but sweating
                  copper is not for everyone. Plus, If they see me tighten 3 bolts to install a flange they would scream when it finally hits them. WOW, I could've done that. For the prices I charge for a flange change out, leading it in is the only way to go.
                  But for a home owner or someone doing it for the first time, the handy man way, is the way to go.
                  Freddy,

                  The entire plumbing community that is in my portion of the United States no longer uses the lead as primary installation.It's a waste of money.

                  Everything is done with the insta-sets.

                  This is anywhere from multi million dollar homes to hospitals.

                  I didn't catch the handy man thing untill a few minutes ago.

                  Are you telling me that in the building industry in your area they are still using them.What area is this.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Toilet Flange Question...


                    HEY GUY'S HERE'S A TIP I USED MANY TIMES,
                    I TAKE A 5/8" OR 3/4" COLD CHISEL AND MY 5 LB. SINGLE JACK, HAMMER AND CUT DOWN AT THE 2 SLOTS WHERE CLOSET BOLTS GO, THIS USUALLY BREAKS APART THE FLANGE MAKING IT EASY TO PULL THE LEAD AND OAKUM OUT,
                    THEN YOU CAN USUALLY PULL THE BROKEN FLANGE PEICES
                    OUT OF THE FLOORING

                    JERRYMAC MASTERPLUMBER
                    JERRYMAC
                    E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
                    CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
                    FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
                    SINCE JAN. 1989

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                      oh Then I Go Back With A Inst. Set Flange And Yes I Have Had Many Homeowners Pay Me For This Work!!!

                      Jerrymac
                      JERRYMAC
                      E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
                      CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
                      FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
                      SINCE JAN. 1989

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                        Hey Jerry, good to see you around..havent heard from ya for awhile
                        The History of Sanitary Sewers Good site on the history of sanitary sewers and cleaners

                        www.thedrainsquad.net Our website

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                          Jerrymac,
                          I like it sounds gonna have to try it some time.Bob D. told me how I could cut cast iron with a chisel a while ago and it actually worked one day that I didn't have my snaps on board.

                          Haven't seen you in around much how you been

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                            WOW! Thanks so much for all of the replies, suggestions and good info! I truly appreciate it! I will be back to work on this project on Tuesday, so I will let everyone know how it goes. Hopefully, it will be smooth, but I have come to expect a catch or two here and there. It's very comforting to know that I have a resource of knowledge like this with a wealth of information from great people like you all. It restores my faith in humanity! If I can find my digital camera, I will try to remember to snap some pics of the whole process to make sure I did it correctly. Thanks again!
                            Nick

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Toilet Flange Question...

                              DONE! Thanks for all of the advice, it worked out great! I could not get the digital to work, but I really don't think anyone wanted to see pics of that anyway!
                              Nick

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