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Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

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  • #16
    Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

    Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
    Bruce, in the same respect, I'm curious about your code on this....
    Well......"code" around here doesn't really mean much as far as plumbing is concerned. Most of the jurisdictions use "combination" inspectors who inspect everything; building, mechanical, electrical and plumbing. They are more like home inspectors than they are experts in any one field. You might have an inspector that really knows plumbing, but knows only just enough about the other trades, but that's rare. These inspectors seem to know mostly about structural and electrical, but very little about plumbing, mechanical and gas. This makes it very easy for people to do just about anything they want when it comes to plumbing -- except for missing a nail plate. I could probably transition from cast iron to PVC with duct tape and get away with it.

    There was a time -- maybe fifteen years ago, when this wasn't the case. We used expansion joints, male/female transitions, No-Hub adapters, proper support, etc. The inspectors would even take aesthetics into consideration. If it didn't look good, they knew it, and they would require replacement. Now, most inspectors don't even know if a job is sloppy or not -- let alone per code.

    My work is done per code and I take care in making it look good. I do this for me and for my customers.......and for the next plumber to see that some plumbers do still (or once did) take pride in their work around here.

    When I price jobs, I take this into consideration, and I know I have lost jobs for this reason alone. It's a shame, but it is the truth.

    Bruce

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    • #17
      Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

      Bruce you easily could have been talking about Los Angeles as well

      Sounds VERY similar

      Joey
      I love my plumber

      "My Hero"

      Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

        im so glad that pvc is not allowed on potable water here. the only pressure system that can have pvc is a sprinkler system with a check valve. the job looks poor for a tradesman, but ok for a homeowner. hope you didnt pay your bill yet. i would start from scratch, any thought into pex waterlines. no joints no problem.

        i would never allow pvc in my houes why? i bet the taste of glue residue is preaty gross and not good for ya
        how is it that so many answers are in the instructions

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

          Originally posted by proplumb View Post
          im so glad that pvc is not allowed on potable water here. the only pressure system that can have pvc is a sprinkler system with a check valve. the job looks poor for a tradesman, but ok for a homeowner. hope you didnt pay your bill yet. i would start from scratch, any thought into pex waterlines. no joints no problem.

          i would never allow pvc in my houes why? i bet the taste of glue residue is preaty gross and not good for ya
          Not much different than pipe dope or flux!!

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

            Originally posted by brucestorey View Post
            Well......"code" around here doesn't really mean much as far as plumbing is concerned. Most of the jurisdictions use "combination" inspectors who inspect everything; building, mechanical, electrical and plumbing. They are more like home inspectors than they are experts in any one field. You might have an inspector that really knows plumbing, but knows only just enough about the other trades, but that's rare. These inspectors seem to know mostly about structural and electrical, but very little about plumbing, mechanical and gas. This makes it very easy for people to do just about anything they want when it comes to plumbing -- except for missing a nail plate. I could probably transition from cast iron to PVC with duct tape and get away with it.

            There was a time -- maybe fifteen years ago, when this wasn't the case. We used expansion joints, male/female transitions, No-Hub adapters, proper support, etc. The inspectors would even take aesthetics into consideration. If it didn't look good, they knew it, and they would require replacement. Now, most inspectors don't even know if a job is sloppy or not -- let alone per code.

            My work is done per code and I take care in making it look good. I do this for me and for my customers.......and for the next plumber to see that some plumbers do still (or once did) take pride in their work around here.

            When I price jobs, I take this into consideration, and I know I have lost jobs for this reason alone. It's a shame, but it is the truth.

            Bruce
            Very well said, I completely agree and understand where your coming from. Like I have said many times before, I will walk from a job then put my "signature" on crap work. I have walked before, and I am sure I will walk again.

            I don't care if it is buried in the dirt, buried in a wall, or buried under the farthest crawl space, some one, sometime will see it.

            I am very happy that cpvc is not widely used here, I would and will never use it, I think there is nothing worse in a house then a pvc product, let alone a water system

            PVC is for gardeners, homeowners and handymen, just like sharkbit fittings.

            Guy's and gals, take pride in your work, it's your signature.

            Never do crap work.

            Never work for cheap.

            Never get into, or stay in, the plumbing trade, to be the cheapest, but to offer quality service, trade knowledge, and pride.

            Provide a quality service for a respectable price.

            Plumbing is more then just pushing pipes toghether with some glue.
            Last edited by westcoastplumber; 10-07-2007, 06:10 PM.
            sigpic

            Robert

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

              Bruce, things have changed here as well.
              I've even had occasion to yank out the book and explain to an inspector why I'd jumped through loops to get a sewage ejector drain set up as the final fixture going through a CI main.
              He almost seemed irritated with me when I'd run a seperate 2" line parallel to an existing line to get it tied into the 4" stub through the foundation.
              It was an awful lot of extra work, to think I coulda hacked it and maybe not have been questioned.
              Then there are other towns I look forward to working in because the inspector might be a ****breaker, but I know he'll let me "pick his brain".

              Robert, here a majority of new construction homes are going up with either PEX or CPVC, unless they're high end.
              The plumbers bidding these jobs are forced to price that way because both were recently made legal within the last 5 years or so.
              Giving many new construction plumbers the option of getting out of new resi., finding a new line of work, or starving.
              Personally, I've used both working for other shops.
              The PEX I just don't like, period.
              Expansion fittings make me nervous.
              Crimps make me even more nervous. (for those who recall the whole PB scandal, another reason sharbite/Propress don't have me jumpin' just yet)
              PEX's appearance...well we don't have to get into that, I'm sure we all agree.
              There are counties in the U.S. that actually don't allow metal piping because of the waters mineral content eating away at copper too rapidly.
              You and I are lucky, we're not usually bidding larger jobs against our peers for work in a slowing economy.
              Just be mindful of the shops that are...sad but true they have families to feed and the high end market is limited.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                PEX's appearance...well we don't have to get into that, I'm sure we all agree.
                There are counties in the U.S. that actually don't allow metal piping because of the waters mineral content eating away at copper too rapidly.
                You and I are lucky, we're not usually bidding larger jobs against our peers for work in a slowing economy.
                Just be mindful of the shops that are...sad but true they have families to feed and the high end market is limited.[/quote]


                Very true ducky, I agree and I thank you for making look in this direction, I never thought of it this way.

                Now that I think of it, It makes me sick to think we may installing cpvc in the next 10 years, and making $8 an hr to do it.
                sigpic

                Robert

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                  Same here bro.
                  In the same respect, I betcha this conversation happened 100-fold with plumbing contractors just a few years back when Poly-Butylene was made legal.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                    plumbkerscrack & brucestorey....yes, no plastic. the local plumbing inspector in our small city(not a village or town), when questioned about that, noted that when it burns, plastic releases a toxic gas. that was his rationale for not alowing it. DWV can be copper, galvanized or cast iron with banded couplings. not sure about black pipe. NO pex here either for potable water. while the inspector points to safety as the reason for the codes being what they are, it does create a greater need for plumbers here as most homeowners cannot handle metal in plumbing applications.
                    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                      Originally posted by proplumb View Post
                      im so glad that pvc is not allowed on potable water here. i would never allow pvc in my houes why? i bet the taste of glue residue is preaty gross and not good for ya
                      I don't think PVC is acceptable for residential potable water piping in the US either. I belive the pipe pictured is CPVC, which is acceptable in Canada and the US. CPVC has never really caught on up here, Thank God!
                      You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

                      By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                        Where did you go, Pauline?

                        Bruce

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                          Originally posted by Hondahead View Post
                          I don't think PVC is acceptable for residential potable water piping in the US either. I belive the pipe pictured is CPVC, which is acceptable in Canada and the US. CPVC has never really caught on up here, Thank God!

                          Same here honda, atleast not around my area, I am not a big fan of the cpvc, like I said, plastic is for gardners, not plumbers
                          sigpic

                          Robert

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Does this look right?-- Stack Pipe replacement

                            CPVC is used around here by some plumbers (British Columbia, Canada), but PEX has been the standard for single family (and some multi-family) residential for a number of years. I agree that CPVC is horrible stuff, it's more difficult to work than PEX, and the glue is awful.

                            Unfortunately, in our market, cost is the biggest issue to most developers. Also, around here, anything copper, brass or aluminum that isn't protected by armed guards is being stolen by junkies. So, installing Copper pipe in a new house that has no windows, doors etc. is just an invitation for theft. Last multi-family project I worked on was piped in PEX, but crack-heads broke in and stole all the Pressure Reducing Valves (including the brass ball valves) in the middle of the night.

                            Too bad only one of the buildings had the water service turned on.

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