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  • Bathtub Drain Advice

    Hi All,
    In the midst of a big bathroom reno and was looking for confirmation/suggestions on the new bathtub install. I have the room gutted and have installed the new ledger for the bath. I have purachsed and assembled the waste/overflow assembly for the new tub and am questioning the best way to go about connecting to the exsiting trap.

    Upon removing the old tub, I cut away the tail piece that lead from the bathtub tee connection. All existing plumbing joints in the floor are glued so there are no mechanical connections. Is it satisfactory to put a coupler above the up swing of the P-trap that will accept the tail piece of the tub drain? If I do this, it may be challenging to get all the plumbing pieces in place and aligned for glue up. The only way I can envision doing it is to make all connections on the waste and overflow assembly then move the bathtub into place over the trap once I have dry-fit? This means I really only get one shot at having things aligned!
    Is there any easier/less risky way to make all these connections? Any other ideas?

    On a different note, when I install the strainer into the bottom of the tub is it ok to use plumbers putty under the drain piece? I am installing a fiberglass reienforced acrylic tub and have read that plumbers putty will cause it to yellow? I suppose I could use silicone caulking instead.

  • #2
    Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

    I'm sorry I can't give you the easier answer your looking for.

    When we set these tubs we pre-set the waste and overflows then set the tub in place.

    You can use slip-nut type instalation but then you need to provide an access panel.

    I just had to cut a hole in a home's ceiling to gain access to a roman tub that was converted to a fiberglass jacuzzi,plastic slip nut that came loose
    Last edited by drtyhands; 10-15-2007, 12:14 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

      I have used putty on plenty of fiberglass.But if the mfr warns....

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      • #4
        Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

        Thx for the reply. Just to clarify, that means you would need to pre-glue the tail piece on the drain assembly and the pipe on the trap and try to set tub in place? What is the open time on ABS glue? I know once the connection is made it is not too long but exposed only to air, how long is rasonable to expect before it is set?

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        • #5
          Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

          Originally posted by cjt View Post
          Thx for the reply. Just to clarify, that means you would need to pre-glue the tail piece on the drain assembly and the pipe on the trap and try to set tub in place? What is the open time on ABS glue? I know once the connection is made it is not too long but exposed only to air, how long is rasonable to expect before it is set?
          I think I know what you are trying to ask,and it's not how long you can leave a glue can open.
          Are you concerned about how long the glued product needs to sit before you set the tub.If you hit dead on,you can screw the drain spud almost immediately after setting the tub in place.If your talking about adjusting the fittings while your assembling the configuration,you have a few seconds from the time you insert the pipe into the socket.If you set the tub in place and you missed......take the tub out and re-do.There are some tricks.

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          • #6
            Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

            I think you guys are talking about two different methods. CJT, Adam is telling you to set the W&O up on the drain first then set the tub over the made up assembly. Once the tub is set over the W&O you install the drain flange and overflow plate onto the W&O.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

              I was actually thinking the open time for the glue after it is applied and before the connection to the joint must be made. However, your answer has changed my thinking as I believe you are suggesting that the drain assembly be put together and attached to the trap prior to attaching the drain spud. I was thinking that the whole drain would need to be connected to the tub prior to making the connection with the trap. This way I can see setting the main connection to the trap, ensuring alignment with the drain then tightening the spud. Perhaps that is easier.

              Thanks again

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                We do sometimes attach the waste and overflow assembly to the tub and set it into place connecting the trap from underneath,when we have access.
                When we do not have access,we fabricate the waste and overflow assembly and trap complete with glue,set the tub then install the drain spud and overflow trim.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                  Originally posted by cjt View Post
                  Hi All,
                  In the midst of a big bathroom reno and was looking for confirmation/suggestions on the new bathtub install. I have the room gutted and have installed the new ledger for the bath. I have purachsed and assembled the waste/overflow assembly for the new tub and am questioning the best way to go about connecting to the exsiting trap.

                  Upon removing the old tub, I cut away the tail piece that lead from the bathtub tee connection. All existing plumbing joints in the floor are glued so there are no mechanical connections. Is it satisfactory to put a coupler above the up swing of the P-trap that will accept the tail piece of the tub drain? If I do this, it may be challenging to get all the plumbing pieces in place and aligned for glue up. The only way I can envision doing it is to make all connections on the waste and overflow assembly then move the bathtub into place over the trap once I have dry-fit? This means I really only get one shot at having things aligned!
                  Is there any easier/less risky way to make all these connections? Any other ideas?

                  On a different note, when I install the strainer into the bottom of the tub is it ok to use plumbers putty under the drain piece? I am installing a fiberglass reienforced acrylic tub and have read that plumbers putty will cause it to yellow? I suppose I could use silicone caulking instead.

                  If you use a tubular waste and overflow, you can use a shielded coupling called a T150, it is 11/2 tubular x 11/2 plastic/steel. Keep in mind, if you use a slip joint waste and overflow, you will have to use an access panel, as the slip joint connections have to be accessable.

                  The way I set my tubs and showers is to measure the drain off the walls and find my center, then I remove the tub or shower, install all the fittings, glued toghether off my measurements, slid the tub or shower back into place and screw down the trim, it is easier this way, I don't have a no-hub band I need to torque later.

                  I would not suggest using silicone on and acrylic tub because the tub flexes and the silicon will crack away and will leak for sure, gauranteed! Use putty and it will be fine, putty is the best way to go, it never hardens and it flexes with the acrylic shower pan.
                  Last edited by westcoastplumber; 10-15-2007, 07:21 PM.
                  sigpic

                  Robert

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                  • #10
                    Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                    WCP,

                    I am in a similar spot as this request and have a couple other questions. I am OK with lining up the trap/drain to be on the money. What I don't get is how to line up the height of drain. This is a Sterling Ensemble and it recommends either installing in a mortar bed or on the little felty pad that comes with it. I was leaning towards the mortar bed (more of a solid feel with less flex), but I am unsure of how to adjust for the height in this case? Do you just set the tub in mortar? The manufacturer recomends not setting the feet in mortar? How does one manage to not set one of the 20 or so little feet into mortar. If the feet are in mortar, the tub height will differ from that when it is set on the floor.

                    One other question, the top of the trap for this tub is about 13" below where the tub drain would end up. Is this too far away? I was just going to put a riser and join it to the W/O, but it looks a bit weird to my unexperienced plumbers eye.

                    Thanks for any input!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                      Westcoast,
                      Here we are,the masses are once again hanging on your oratorical skills.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                        HAHA Adam, what is a plumber doing using my 75cent words

                        I had to explain to Rick. Robert is probably fumbling for a dictionary now

                        You always make me laugh
                        I love my plumber

                        "My Hero"

                        Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                          Originally posted by socalspur View Post
                          WCP,

                          I am in a similar spot as this request and have a couple other questions. I am OK with lining up the trap/drain to be on the money. What I don't get is how to line up the height of drain. This is a Sterling Ensemble and it recommends either installing in a mortar bed or on the little felty pad that comes with it. I was leaning towards the mortar bed (more of a solid feel with less flex), but I am unsure of how to adjust for the height in this case? Do you just set the tub in mortar? The manufacturer recomends not setting the feet in mortar? How does one manage to not set one of the 20 or so little feet into mortar. If the feet are in mortar, the tub height will differ from that when it is set on the floor.

                          One other question, the top of the trap for this tub is about 13" below where the tub drain would end up. Is this too far away? I was just going to put a riser and join it to the W/O, but it looks a bit weird to my unexperienced plumbers eye.

                          Thanks for any input!
                          From what I understand, the tub has to rest on the leg supports, even when you use mortar, so pour your mortar, about 2" thick from what the sterling web side said in the flat areas of the bottom of the tub, leaving the area where the legs set, clean of mortar, then squash down, keeping in mind the mortar will squash out.

                          As far as the height of the drain, dry set your tub, without mortar, measure it up, remember, adding the mortar will only make it change the durability, shouldn't change the height because the tub still has to rest on the leg supports without mortar.

                          I gathered this from the sterling web site.

                          As far as connecting the waste and overflow to the trap, the height you described is ok. No problems there.

                          Here is the info I found on the web site in case anyone else has anything to add:

                          Install a Mortar Cement Bed (Optional)
                          Remove the bath and pad from the alcove.
                          NOTE:
                          Do not use plaster, gypsum cement, or drywall compound for this
                          application, as they will not provide adequate structural support.

                          NOTE:
                          The bath supports must rest directly on the subfloor.
                          Spread a 2
                          (5.1 cm) layer of mortar cement on the subfloor, spreading it so that
                          each area of the bath that will contact the subfloor has mortar cement. Do not
                          spread the mortar cement around the drain area. Allow room for the mortar
                          cement to expand from the weight of the bath.
                          Immediately move the bath into position.
                          Verify that the bath is level and resting on all supports.
                          Clean the bath to reduce the risk of damaging the surface.
                          Place a clean drop cloth or other similar material into the bottom and over the

                          outside edge of the bath. Be careful not to scratch the surface of the unit.

                          I have never purchased sterling products and only use mortar on my jacuzzi tubs, but it sounds like it shouldn't be a big deal. Good luck, hope this helps.

                          Most important...make sure your tub is level and plumb when you stick it in the mortar, it will be too late when the mortar sets up to fix it later.
                          sigpic

                          Robert

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                          • #14
                            Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                            I like to put thin visqueen membrane between tub and mortar.Sure helps if the tub ever has to come out,usually when the homeowner changes their mind and you have to return it to the supply house.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Bathtub Drain Advice

                              Originally posted by MrsSeatDown View Post
                              HAHA Adam, what is a plumber doing using my 75cent words

                              I had to explain to Rick. Robert is probably fumbling for a dictionary now

                              You always make me laugh
                              Are you kidding Joey,our youngster doesn't even own one.He's the new age,He's got computer skills.

                              Oh,wait a minute.
                              This just in:
                              His mom gave him one.It's supporting the recliner where the leg broke off

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