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Tub/shower valve install

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  • Tub/shower valve install

    Novice plumber about to embark on the replacement of existing tub/shower fixtures.

    I have purchased delta tub/shower fixtures including the pressure balanced valve. I have full access to the wet wall and will be installing the set then hanging CBU and tile. It does not appear to be a terribly complex job i.e.
    1) make supply connections to valvle
    2) run riser to shower elbow
    3) drop pipe for faucet
    4) Connect faucet pipe/nipple
    5) Test
    6) hang wall

    Is there anything I should keep in mind that may bite me in the butt? One concern I have is the depth I should set the valve assembly/nipple/shower elbow at to accomodate finished wall thickness. With 1/2" CBU then tile, is there some rule of thumb? The delta valve has a 'Plasterguard' attached to it that I gather is supposed to facilitate installation. Thoughts?

    Thanks much
    Last edited by cjt; 10-22-2007, 12:15 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Tub/shower valve install

    Don't use female adapters to connect the pipe to the mixing valve. Solder the pipe directly into the valve. Just follow the directions and the installtion is straight forward.
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Tub/shower valve install

      you'd better find out what your finished wall is going to be at.

      I can tell by your post you haven't read the directions yet

      Yes,you really should give them a good looking over at this point in your plumbing career.

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      • #4
        Re: Tub/shower valve install

        Despite the appearance of my earlier post, I actually had read the instructions. It says to hang valve so the plasterguard is flush with finished wall. I guess I was wondering if there was some trick to doing this as accurately guessing the thickness of CBU + mortar + tile seems somewhat prone to miscalculation.

        Similarly with the shower elbow, is there a correct distance that it should be behind the finished wall or is it not terribly critical since the shower arm will simply feed through the wall (assuming everything lines up! )

        In my previous postings, the experts have had great tips and tricks that have saved me many headaches....just looking for similar input!

        TIA

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        • #5
          Re: Tub/shower valve install



          As long as your riser is reasonably vertical as to keep the shower stub out perpendicular to the wall so the escutcheon ring sits flush you should be in good shape.If you are going to solder directly into the valve and are going to try and keep the cartridge in place use a spray bottle to help cool the body between soldering joints.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Tub/shower valve install

            Oh! I know this one! I put one of these in my new shower (which, for those who are keeping track, still isn't finished...)

            Firstly, take the thing apart so you don't have plastic parts that can be damaged by the heat. You'll be left with just the brass shell. I put all the bits and pieces neatly down as I took them out so they'd be easy to put back in place in the correct order.

            Then, since you've already got your framing in place, it should be pretty easy to tell where the wall face is gonna end up. If nothing else, slap a strip of whatever tile backer you're going to use across a couple studs to get an idea. As you said, you need to line up that plastic piece so it's flush with the finished wall. Mine might actually be a little too far out, but I think there's a little wiggle room when all is said and done.

            Finally, for the top part, just run the pipe straight up from the valve housing and put the shower elbow on the top. As you said... the arm will go through the wall to it and the distance will be fine, assuming you put the valve in the right spot. Same goes for the part going down to the spout.

            WHen you've got that part in place, don't worry about soldering on the spout adapter until you're about ready to finish the wall. Then you can put it exactly where you want it.

            Now bear in mind... I'm not one of the pros here. I just hang out now and then and learn... but I already did this particular one so hopefully my experience is of a little value.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Tub/shower valve install

              General rule is about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inches from the studs to the front of the rough in plate.

              This all depends on the tile guy, heck, I had a tile guy float a 2 1/4" wall obnoxiously stupid

              As far as the shower riser and tub riser, use drop ear 90's and back them with 2x4's, when that is done, screw in a 1/2 x 6" galv nipple and a cap on both, turn the water on to make sure you have no leaks in any piping.

              Leave the nipples in there and tile up to them, remove them when you are ready to set trim. Strap the valve very good.
              sigpic

              Robert

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              • #8
                Re: Tub/shower valve install

                What does that mean? "Strap the valve very good"?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Tub/shower valve install

                  Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
                  What does that mean? "Strap the valve very good"?

                  Are you serious? or just being a smart as!?
                  sigpic

                  Robert

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                  • #10
                    Re: Tub/shower valve install

                    Serious, though I have a feeling it's gonna be stupidly obvious once you say it.

                    Do you mean to pin it in place? Like with those copper straps you put around pipe?

                    If that's the case, the valve itself has 4 mounting points on it for screws to make it as secure as it's ever going to be.

                    If you're talking about something else, please clue me in. I'm hoping it's the terminology that's throwing me here.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Tub/shower valve install

                      That's cute you guys
                      strap = secure

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Tub/shower valve install

                        Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
                        Serious, though I have a feeling it's gonna be stupidly obvious once you say it.

                        Do you mean to pin it in place? Like with those copper straps you put around pipe?

                        If that's the case, the valve itself has 4 mounting points on it for screws to make it as secure as it's ever going to be.

                        If you're talking about something else, please clue me in. I'm hoping it's the terminology that's throwing me here.


                        Lol, ok then, well, you had it right. Dependant upon the valve, you can back it with a 2 x 4 and use the holes in the body of the valve, which are mean't for strapping, or you can use 2 hole straps, copper type, they have many types of straps, Holdrite makes specialty straps which fit every application.

                        Please note that not all valve bodies have strapping points, you need to kinda "create your own"

                        It is very important to strap the valve properly because in the future when it needs to be serviced, if it moves there is more of a risk of it breaking the copper lines when a plumber goes to replace the stem or cartridge, Water hammer, etc.

                        Other reasons to strap properly, so the valve doesn't move back and fourth and `cause water to go behind the flange, strap the shower arm really well because I have twisted those drop ears off trying to replace shower arms, same with the tub spouts.

                        Strapping is as important as solder joints. Properly strapped valves contribute to a properly completed, clean, correct installation.
                        sigpic

                        Robert

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                        • #13
                          Re: Tub/shower valve install

                          Originally posted by westcoastplumber View Post
                          General rule is about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inches from the studs to the front of the rough in plate.
                          This seems like a larger offset from studs to finished wall than I would anticipate. Assuming studs are relatively flush with the edge of the tub, I would calculate 1/2" for CBU + 1/8" thinset + 1/4" tile = 7/8".

                          What am I missing?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Tub/shower valve install

                            Originally posted by cjt View Post
                            This seems like a larger offset from studs to finished wall than I would anticipate. Assuming studs are relatively flush with the edge of the tub, I would calculate 1/2" for CBU + 1/8" thinset + 1/4" tile = 7/8".

                            What am I missing?
                            Robert is giving you the number he knows for when the tile installer is using the concrete float installation with 1/4 round edges.

                            3/4"-1" is a good number if the bullnose type installation where the bullnose returns flush to drywall adjacent to tub/shower
                            This is pretty much what you have cjt.So your not missing anything.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Tub/shower valve install

                              Originally posted by cjt View Post
                              This seems like a larger offset from studs to finished wall than I would anticipate. Assuming studs are relatively flush with the edge of the tub, I would calculate 1/2" for CBU + 1/8" thinset + 1/4" tile = 7/8".

                              What am I missing?
                              I hope you don't assume this every time without talking to whoever is running the job.

                              People are starting to lean towards a tighter look on the return edge of t/s.

                              Your gonna get caught out to far one of these times.

                              Comment

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