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Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

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  • Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

    I will be running copper HW baseboard heat in the finished basement space in our 85 year old colonial soon. As the baseboard heating elements will be at or below the level of the boiler, and there will be two floor to ceiling height risers to get past doorways and hallways, does anyone have any thoughts on what should be done to provide for draining this zone's baseboards shoudld they need to be worked on in the future? Are there any sort of fittings that should be put somewhere in the "loop" of copper pipe and baseboards that make up this zone? Comments appreciated.
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

  • #2
    Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

    You can add cutoff valves in cieling ands a drain valve on each drop to fintube if you want but I only do that if you need to provide freeze protection.

    I would def. put on Monoflo tees on supply and return side of drops. These will help push the water down and back up to main. This will provide better heat.

    If you need more info let me know

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    • #3
      Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

      Finer, they make a fitting we call baseboard tee's looks like a 90 degree ell with a 1/8 tapping on the heel. Normally we use them with the 1/8 port upright for a coin vent but they work just as well as a drain with the port on the bottom with a brass plug. Just use a 1/8 brass plug .

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      • #4
        Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

        THis may be a realy bad idea, but here goes. What about putting a boiler drian valve on the supply side of the zone piping. After the flo check but before the circulator(which is on the return side). Thsi drain valve could be used as a supply point for compressed air. The shut off that is between the zone piping and the circulator could be closed, the zone drain valve opened and compressed air would "blow out" the water in the basement zone, eliminating the need to worry about catching zone heating water from small elbows with 1/8" drains close to the floor. Any thoughts appreciated.
        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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        • #5
          Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

          Finer , You are over thinking this, just put the baseboard in. How often are you going to have to open up that zone. Is it going to freeze ? In a abusive space? Chances are you will install the baseboard and not work on it for the next twenty years. I work on systems without any kind of drain all the time , I just use a wet/dry vac to control the mess.
          The more you "WHAT IF" something , the longer and more confusing it will get.

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          • #6
            Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

            Agreed, But this isn't just a job for me, it is my home. The mess I don't have to clean up because I anticipated a potential problem will lessen the stress experienced should a problem occur. Again, anyone see any problems with blowing out a 3/4" copper baseboard zone using compressed air. Comments appreciated.
            there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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            • #7
              Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

              There is no problem with using compressed air to blow out your loop , just make sure you can isolate the zone with ball valves on the supply and return.
              Your piping and baseboard will take 100 psi but your boiler can only take 30 psi. Be careful.

              So off your manifold start your zone with a ball valve , then a 3/4 boiler drain, then a flow check( in this order if your flow check fails you can blow out the zone to replace it) then out to your zone piping , through your zone, then a 3/4 boiler drain ( so you can purge air out), then a ball valve, then a circulator, then a ball valve( in case the pump fails).

              Now there are also cirulator pumps with built in flow checks ( Taco IFC http://www.taco-hvac.com/en/products...nt_category=53) , and circulator flanges with ball valves built in ( webstone http://www.webstonevalves.com/isolator.html ) as well to help you out.

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              • #8
                Re: Basement Family Room Baseboard Heating

                thanks for the feedback. too late on the supply manifold side as i already have my flo check, then a ball valve (although i can see the benefit of your suggestion re: the flo check). I can, though, still install the boiler drain valve as the input for the compressed air on the loop feeding my basement zone. as the loop returns to the boiler, i have a combination shut off and beeder valve, then the zone circulator and then on to the boiler. am i right that by closing the drain portion of the combination valve and opening the bleeder portion, which normally bleeds off air and water as the zone is filling, any compressed air would force water out of the zone? and thanks for the heads up re air pressure and the boiler.
                there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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