Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Drain help

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Drain help

    Hello all. Although I have gotten a ton of excellent information off of this forum regarding my new table saw, this is my first post, so please bear with me.

    I recently did a bathroom reno on our 40 year old house and installed a 5 1/2' soaker tub in place of the old standard crane. The renovation turned out really well with one exception. When we go to drain the tub (50 US gals, 19" deep) the bathroom sink directly below it overflows all over the basement floor.

    Specifics as follows:

    The tub drain is 1 1/2" copper that Ys into a 2" main. The 2" main runs down to the basement floor, where I assume it remains 2" for a 27' run out to the septic tank.

    The sink drain is 1 3/8" copper that Ys into the same 2" main directly below the tub. The 2" main is vented through the roof. The 1 3/8" sink drain runs up through the wall above the tub and Ts back into the 2" to vent through the roof.

    We used the old tub very little due to a rotten P trap that leaked every time it was used, but had no drain problems. The new tub drains fine for the bottom half, but the extra head pressure from a full tub will cause a backup through the basement sink. The sink drains fine on its own.

    Would the 2" main benefit from a snake run through the clean out, out to the septic tank or should I just install a check valve in the 5 1/4" of down pipe between the sink and the P trap??? Would I have issues with the check valve later on due to hair etc from the sink???

    Thank you in advance for your help.

    Cheers,

    Lee

  • #2
    Re: Drain help

    Remove the words "check valve" out of the equation; it does not exist in this drain problem.

    Resistance means a clog so you need to run the cable down the cleanout.

    Copper won't be underground most times but a transition usually will into cast iron.

    This is where you get 90% of clogs where the transition occurs.

    That will get it open and fix the problem.
    Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Drain help

      First thing would be to run a snake out the line to clean it out before anything else. I would fill the sink up first before snaking it and time how long it takes to empty then snake it (really well not just a single pass) then repeat the sink test to see if it improves before filling up the tub for a test. If no improvement
      then we try other things from there.
      Seattle Drain Service

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Drain help

        Thanks Gents, after a thorough snaking all is well. There was absolutely no change in sink performance before vs after. That is what had me scratching my head in the first place, but in hindsight the physics work. There was not enough resistance to affect the lower sink and old tub pressures but add about 5" of head due to the larger tub and there was enough resistance to back up the flow. Thanks again.

        Lee

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Drain help

          Did you take the check valve out?
          Buy cheap, buy twice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Drain help

            Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
            Did you take the check valve out?
            I never installed one. I thought it might be a possible answer if the snake didn't work.

            Comment

            Working...
            X