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  • gear junkie
    started a topic MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    What is the max? I know the theory that solids will come out of the liquid if the slope is too much but what is too much? The IPC gives a minimum slope of 1/16 to 1/4 and shows a slope of up to 1/2" in 710.1 sizing table. As you increase the size, according to the table, you increase the DFU's each pipe size can handle but at some point it has to become a disadvantage to have such a steep slope.

  • mrbios
    replied
    There is / was some old stuff in the crawl space - a gasoline jerrycan, a water? Jerrycan (much larger cap), and empty 2.5 gallon can of Benzene with a price sticker of $2.45, and old car radio made in Los Angles, an old car jack with a folding crank handle ~ 1940's vintage. Been cleaning the work area and applying diluted bleach from a zep spray bottle. Currently, running a vacuum at the entrance to the crawl space. Also, hooked up a shop vac hose to the washing machine (which has been offline for over 2 weeks) a pipped it out to the sidewalk / street to prevent a rebellion / riot lol...
    Attached Files
    Last edited by mrbios; 04-24-2017, 12:49 AM.

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  • toolaholic
    replied
    I think I know the Guy that wired that house !

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  • PLUMBER RICK
    commented on 's reply
    Nice clean cuts. Lets see the new repair.

    Rick.

  • PLUMBER RICK
    replied
    Not uncommon for a stoppage at the end of the line. Waste will slowly collect at the end of line as the waste enters the comby, it goes both ways. Downstream it flushes out and upstream it collects, eventually it builds up enough to seal off the wye/ tee. More so in cast than plastic piping.

    same principal when you remove a cleanout plug and see all the waste debris trapped in the cleanout and plug.

    Rick.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob D.
    commented on 's reply
    What's the story on the Jerrycan ?

  • mrbios
    replied
    Great suggestions Mightyservant thanks. First surprise the clog was at the end of the run where the pipe starts to go down to meet the sewer. I will have to rent the machine at home depot.
    Clogged Cleanout. Pipe removed.

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  • mrbios
    replied
    Replacing some cast iron and needed guidance on the pitch. Great thread thanks.
    Attached Files

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  • drtyhands
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    Originally posted by Ace Sewer View Post
    I've never seen a vertical plug, (other than a frozen line). I've often pondered this question and never had an answer.... if vertical is ok, and 1/4"/foot is ok, where is the danger zone?
    Code considers anything at 45 degrees and greater vertical.1/4ipf or 2% is required on three inch or smaller.So I would say anything greater than 2% and less than 45 degrees.This is just a theory of mine.

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  • Ace Sewer
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    I've never seen a vertical plug, (other than a frozen line). I've often pondered this question and never had an answer.... if vertical is ok, and 1/4"/foot is ok, where is the danger zone?

    Leave a comment:


  • DuckButter
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
    Ok I'll bite...what's a 'drain layer license'?

    And why are some of the street mains pitched at over 10%...the poop seems to be keeping up with the fluids there
    LOL, a guy gets bonded in that town...I could do it, but sure as hell not about to run around to every town I work in and go through this process over and over.
    The drain @ 10' outside the home is inspected by the town engineering dept. and has to be 6" SDR.
    Usually GC's & excavators have the license...it's worthwhile to go through the process for a large project like new construction, most plumbers won't bother.
    The clincher is that those drains are usually rediculously underscrutinized compared to the homes plumbing.

    Leave a comment:


  • PLUMBER RICK
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
    Ok I'll bite...what's a 'drain layer license'?

    And why are some of the street mains pitched at over 10%...the poop seems to be keeping up with the fluids there
    i think the answer lies in the fact that a sewer in the street typically has more consistent flow and tends to keep things flowing.

    we all know that low flow toilets do not push the waste more than 45' on a single flush. more on a good plastic system and less on an older rough cast system.

    turds stop flowing when the owners not home. the water will continue with the waste high and dry.

    rick.

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  • plumberscrack
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    Ok I'll bite...what's a 'drain layer license'?

    And why are some of the street mains pitched at over 10%...the poop seems to be keeping up with the fluids there

    Leave a comment:


  • DuckButter
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    There lies an irony.
    In my state, anything from 10' outside the foundation requires a "drain layers" license from the particular town you're in.
    I have yet to see any lateral outside that 10' point that maintains any semblence to minimum or uniform pitch.
    I had a soil stack relocation last year where the pitch was screaming back to the street from a house on a hill at over a 6" pitch.
    I had to sub the exterior drain work out, I stipulated a more "friendly" pitch with the excavator.
    The "drain layer" told me I was going overboard.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweatthepipe
    replied
    Re: MAXIMUM dwv slope?

    Originally posted by Herk View Post
    My vote would be, yes, the liquids can run away from the solids. I've always considered it better to run at normal grade, offset 45 degrees, then go back to normal grade than to try to grade the entire line by splitting the difference.
    This would be the correct answer.

    It is better to turn with an 1/8 or 1/4 bend and get back to grade.

    It's the in between that causes trouble.

    Leave a comment:

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