Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

"New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

    Very clever, but nothing new. Back at the turn of the century they would put tanks behind the kitchen stove for the same effect.
    sigpic

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

      Teflon leaks but both teflon and pipe dope doesn't

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

        Here are some pictures...
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

          I just got the second tank to the right installed yesterday. So still working on all this. Note that I don't have a line connected to the T&P yet nor are the holes in the wall filled.

          But it is working as designed. Cold water enters at the bottom of the tank on the right, then exits at the top and goes to the bottom of the tank on the left. Then warm/hot water out top of tank on left. (The right tank is colder than the left tank.)

          The tanks are resting on an old steam heating radiator. This raises them up so the heat from the stove hits the bottoms of the tanks and allows warm air to circulate under the bottoms.

          Each tank has pipes going through the wall which will go to drains for each tank and air escapes for each tank (in addition to the cold/warm water in/out lines).

          At the time I took the pictures, the water was shut off (closed system). I am seeing how much pressure builds as the water warms (not much like 20 psi).

          My city supplied water pressure is 100 psi. Would this be a problem with using an expansion tank? (i.e. is normal water pressure around 60 psi and if I were to install this, would it expand to its capacity at my normal 100 psi water pressure?)

          If I did install an expansion tank, I suppose I should install it above my tanks in my living room (to add to my decor)
          Last edited by Billy_Bob; 04-05-2008, 09:31 AM.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

            Ya know, you could have put those tanks out of sight and figured out how to capture the heat though a return line coiled behind the heater.

            I'm not sure I'd want something that looks like an Iraqi missile launcher next to my TV
            Pete
            Drain Biz
            Articles, Videos, Industry News

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

              Originally posted by Billy_Bob View Post
              Here are some pictures...
              Great bit of work! I hope it saves you a bunch of money keep us informed!
              In the attic instead of running loops of pipe maybe a tank would work better? IF THE ATTICK WILL HANDLE THE WEIGHT!!!!!!!!!! I wounder how many feet of .75 inch pipe it would take to hold 40 gallons" Although the surface area would be greater which should help with heat transfer.

              O.K. I'm out of my ability to help now. Good job

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

                Originally posted by saysflushable View Post
                I wounder how many feet of .75 inch pipe it would take to hold 40 gallons"
                umm roughly 2330 feet of 3/4 pex....at 72* F.

                or

                1487 ft of M copper
                Last edited by UA22PLumberdude; 04-05-2008, 04:24 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

                  Originally posted by saysflushable View Post
                  Great bit of work! I hope it saves you a bunch of money keep us informed!
                  In the attic instead of running loops of pipe maybe a tank would work better? IF THE ATTICK WILL HANDLE THE WEIGHT!!!!!!!!!! I wounder how many feet of .75 inch pipe it would take to hold 40 gallons" Although the surface area would be greater which should help with heat transfer.
                  Actually I have had my electric hot water heater totally disconnected for the past couple of weeks. Had plenty of warm water for my needs. That area next to the woodstove rarely goes below 80 degrees F. and in the mornings when I build a fire it is around 100 degrees F. It is morning now and the temp in that area is 102 degrees F. (The rest of the house is 72 or so.)

                  So it is looking like I will not need to have my electric hot water heater on at all during the fall/winter/spring. The only difference when taking a shower is the hot is on and cold totally off - then the water is warm enough and even steams up the mirror!

                  So far as the attic thing, I found a water storage tank "gallons calculator" based on diameter and height and plugged in the diameter of plastic pipe along with the length. Yes it would take a lot of pipe to hold as much water as a hot water heater. But I am not going to do that.

                  I'm thinking about using large diameter plastic pipe like 2 1/2". Then the water would travel very slowly in the pipe giving it time to heat up. Then from there to perhaps a small fiberglass tank. I will need to circulate this hot water from there to a large insulated tank and may need to supplement it with a bit of electric heating???

                  An electric hot water heater can hold the heat for a LONG time. Like a cooler for camping can retain the cold for many days.

                  Basically in the summer, the water will first go to the tanks in the living room, which with no fire in the living room, the air circulating will heat the water to around 72 degrees F. or so. This will also help to cool the living room! (A bit of free air conditioning.) Then from there to the large diameter pipes in the attic, then to the fiberglass tank, then to a large capacity insulated electric hot water heater. And circulate the water around the electric hot water heater/pipes in attic/fiberglass tank with a solar powered water pump perhaps.

                  It gets VERY hot in the attic like 115 to 125 degrees F.

                  So far as weight, no problem. I can tear apart walls, etc. and add support all the way to the crawl space for the tank. I plan to do this anyway to remodel the room below where the tank will be.

                  But I don't know how well this will work??? I did live in Arizona for awhile and the house pipes were run in the attic. The cold water in the summer was hot! This is what gave me this idea.

                  I will need to monitor the temps in the attic -vs- the temps in the electric hot water heater tank. Then only circulate water when the attic temps are higher. Could easily do this with a cheap furnace thermostat and a few electronic parts.

                  The bottom line is that the water here is very cold year round. It comes from snow melting in the nearby mountains. So even if I am just preheating the water and then using electric to heat it more (my original idea), it will be a big energy savings.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

                    Originally posted by Pete M View Post
                    Ya know, you could have put those tanks out of sight and figured out how to capture the heat though a return line coiled behind the heater...
                    I once read a book on steam heating systems, boilers, etc. The one thing I learned is that I don't want to have ANYTHING to do with a system which has the potential to create steam! (The temperatures on the surface and the sides of the woodstove are around 300 degrees F. - water boils at 212 degrees F.)

                    I recall reading about boilers sometimes going KABOOM, launching up and through the roof, then landing in a neighbor's yard...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

                      Originally posted by Billy_Bob View Post
                      I once read a book on steam heating systems, boilers, etc. The one thing I learned is that I don't want to have ANYTHING to do with a system which has the potential to create steam! (The temperatures on the surface and the sides of the woodstove are around 300 degrees F. - water boils at 212 degrees F.)

                      I recall reading about boilers sometimes going KABOOM, launching up and through the roof, then landing in a neighbor's yard...
                      As long as he has T&P valves on both tanks, it should'nt be a problem.
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: "New Galvanized Pipe" leaks - Right Way?

                        Originally posted by Billy_Bob View Post
                        Actually I have had my electric hot water heater totally disconnected for the past couple of weeks. Had plenty of warm water for my needs. That area next to the woodstove rarely goes below 80 degrees F. and in the mornings when I build a fire it is around 100 degrees F. It is morning now and the temp in that area is 102 degrees F. (The rest of the house is 72 or so.)

                        So it is looking like I will not need to have my electric hot water heater on at all during the fall/winter/spring. The only difference when taking a shower is the hot is on and cold totally off - then the water is warm enough and even steams up the mirror!

                        So far as the attic thing, I found a water storage tank "gallons calculator" based on diameter and height and plugged in the diameter of plastic pipe along with the length. Yes it would take a lot of pipe to hold as much water as a hot water heater. But I am not going to do that.

                        I'm thinking about using large diameter plastic pipe like 2 1/2". Then the water would travel very slowly in the pipe giving it time to heat up. Then from there to perhaps a small fiberglass tank. I will need to circulate this hot water from there to a large insulated tank and may need to supplement it with a bit of electric heating???

                        An electric hot water heater can hold the heat for a LONG time. Like a cooler for camping can retain the cold for many days.

                        Basically in the summer, the water will first go to the tanks in the living room, which with no fire in the living room, the air circulating will heat the water to around 72 degrees F. or so. This will also help to cool the living room! (A bit of free air conditioning.) Then from there to the large diameter pipes in the attic, then to the fiberglass tank, then to a large capacity insulated electric hot water heater. And circulate the water around the electric hot water heater/pipes in attic/fiberglass tank with a solar powered water pump perhaps.

                        It gets VERY hot in the attic like 115 to 125 degrees F.

                        So far as weight, no problem. I can tear apart walls, etc. and add support all the way to the crawl space for the tank. I plan to do this anyway to remodel the room below where the tank will be.

                        But I don't know how well this will work??? I did live in Arizona for awhile and the house pipes were run in the attic. The cold water in the summer was hot! This is what gave me this idea.

                        I will need to monitor the temps in the attic -vs- the temps in the electric hot water heater tank. Then only circulate water when the attic temps are higher. Could easily do this with a cheap furnace thermostat and a few electronic parts.

                        The bottom line is that the water here is very cold year round. It comes from snow melting in the nearby mountains. So even if I am just preheating the water and then using electric to heat it more (my original idea), it will be a big energy savings.
                        I have seen a few big tanks next to water heaters. I heard them referred to as tempering tanks.

                        I like the type of ingenuity your using. I've thought about trying to capture the attic heat but I've been to lazy. You may have stirred me to action I don't know what it cost's to heat my hot water but it might be fun to look into.

                        You mentioned draining the attic system in the winter. Make it easy to drain and blow out with compressed air and you should be all set.

                        Again keep us informed especially for the summer heat.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X