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  • You can put up your drywall now.

    If the plumber tells you, "You can put up your drywall now." how should you expect to take that?

    What does this mean exactly?
    To me it means that the water lines and system have been pressure tested and do not leak.
    Or does it mean, that there is a pretty good chance it should not leak and hopefully it wont?
    What happens when pipes leak in the walls after the drywall is on?
    Who pays for tearing off all the drywall, finding and repairing the leak, then repairing and replacing all the drywall?

    I ask because I pressure tested a plumbing rough-in after the plumber already tested and said it "was good and I could put up my drywall." I found that the pressure went from 50psi to 30psi in one day. I started checking all the connections and when I went to the shower fixtures and could hear the air escaping from the fittings. I was told by my plumber that all was fine and I could install my drywall. If I would have, there would have been thousands if not tens of thousands of dollars in water damage to walls, flooring, carpeting etc etc.

    Help! Should I make him repair and re-imburse me for the delay in the project?

    The thing that upsets me is that he said it was ok when it really wasnt.
    Last edited by dannywild; 05-09-2008, 10:38 PM.

  • #2
    Re: You can put up your drywall now.

    I go kindof slow on stuff like this now,the elders here and have been burned over these disputes.

    Can you tell me why the plumber was not supplied a water source to charge and leave charged through the remainder of the constrution.
    Last edited by drtyhands; 05-09-2008, 11:15 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: You can put up your drywall now.

      when i did house plumbing long ago i had water in the pipes before the drywall went up . now that i do all heating now i still want water in the pipes before walls and ceilings go in i see a lot of plumbers not putting water in it and do just the air test .my air test better not drop more then a pound or two in 24 hr .

      i would ask him what he thinks and see what he says
      Charlie

      My seek the peek fundraiser page
      http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


      http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

      new work pictures 12/09
      http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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      • #4
        Re: You can put up your drywall now.

        O/K
        With the limited info I have gathered.I would not charge a cheap non-licensed professional that does not know how to cap a waste line so the framer can continue forward.He cannot give me a professional product.He does not know how.If he did he would charge more.

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        • #5
          Re: You can put up your drywall now.

          Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
          O/K
          With the limited info I have gathered.I would not charge a cheap non-licensed professional that does not know how to cap a waste line so the framer can continue forward.He cannot give me a professional product.He does not know how.If he did he would charge more.
          It is the supply lines that are under air pressure... I haven't even tested the waste lines yet.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: You can put up your drywall now.

            Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
            I go kindof slow on stuff like this now,the elders here and have been burned over these disputes.

            Can you tell me why the plumber was not supplied a water source to charge and leave charged through the remainder of the constrution.
            The water is not available yet (city water delays). However there is water available from a neighbor via a garden hose.

            Should I have the plumber put water in the lines? If its leaking air, it would still leak water too wouldn't it?

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            • #7
              Re: You can put up your drywall now.

              So who should be responsible for the water damage repairs to walls, flooring, carpeting etc when the plumber leaves a leaking supply system?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                Not sure what's going on here. I remember your earlier post about your plumber. You're your own contractor if I recall. You're either browbeating your plumber or your plumber sucks. From what I've seen it seems like the latter. Was he the cheapest guy?

                Have him put water in the water lines and pressure it up to 100lbs. Then look for leaks and watch your gauge. WHETHER INSPECTION HAS PASSED OR NOT. We've all seen air/water leak out of different places on a test. A joint someone overlooked, showerhead stubout not tight enough, or my favorite....the dreaded leaking at the gauge setup.

                J.C.

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                • #9
                  Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                  Originally posted by dannywild View Post
                  The water is not available yet (city water delays). However there is water available from a neighbor via a garden hose.

                  Should I have the plumber put water in the lines? If its leaking air, it would still leak water too wouldn't it?
                  Water now!!!

                  At first I laugh when the developer tells me the city hasn't given his meter.He figures I don't know he's holding out on the fees till the last minute.Then he gets a certified letter telling him I'm not responsible for leaks because he did not provide water.

                  This point in time is past the last minute on your project.

                  The water needs to be left under street pressure during construction.When I test my copper water systems in the rough I use my compressor to raise to150lbs then CO2 to top off to 300 PSI.After test I will introduce water by way of connecting to street.

                  Drywall/cabinet screws are notorious for finding their way to penetrate pipes.Even when protected(everyone makes mistakes).When you use air no-one knows.

                  Do not under any circumstance consider the lame hose test only good enough.The Lanscaper/drywaller/concrete helpers are going to turn whatever valves they can find looking for water.If the water pressure is down there is even more of a risk the nail/screw is going to rust in place.These don't leak till sometimes years down the road.

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                  • #10
                    Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                    Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                    Water now!!!

                    At first I laugh when the developer tells me the city hasn't given his meter.He figures I don't know he's holding out on the fees till the last minute.Then he gets a certified letter telling him I'm not responsible for leaks because he did not provide water.

                    This point in time is past the last minute on your project.

                    The water needs to be left under street pressure during construction.When I test my copper water systems in the rough I use my compressor to raise to150lbs then CO2 to top off to 300 PSI.After test I will introduce water by way of connecting to street.

                    Drywall/cabinet screws are notorious for finding their way to penetrate pipes.Even when protected(everyone makes mistakes).When you use air no-one knows.

                    Do not under any circumstance consider the lame hose test only good enough.The Lanscaper/drywaller/concrete helpers are going to turn whatever valves they can find looking for water.If the water pressure is down there is even more of a risk the nail/screw is going to rust in place.These don't leak till sometimes years down the road.
                    I like your advice in here....

                    Who's responsible???? Thats easy, the General Contractor, did you play the roll of G.C., then you have a little bit of trouble. Your Plumber should have done the job correctly and you should have over seen his work, that should have been done correctly, so who's at fault here, your both at fault. But the scale will slightly tilt at the plumber for being more at fault.

                    Now call me stupid on this one, Plumber telling who ever to go ahead and put up the drywall, is there something wrong with that picture. What about inspection. I must be missing a lot to this story, so I should just stay quiet, for now.....
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                      Ok I spotted something that I must have read to quickly and missed it. Is this a remodel, an addition or a new build. Carpet ????????
                      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                      http://www.contractorspub.com

                      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                        OMG! 300 psi? Adam That's a little overkill for residential domestic don't you think?

                        We would only do a hydrostatic pressure test like that on a fire main

                        Glad I'm not the one cutting the first copper cap off. Might hurt somebody.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                          This is how it is. You pay peanuts,You get MONKEYS !
                          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                            Originally posted by garager View Post
                            I like your advice in here....

                            Who's responsible???? Thats easy, the General Contractor, did you play the roll of G.C., then you have a little bit of trouble. Your Plumber should have done the job correctly and you should have over seen his work, that should have been done correctly, so who's at fault here, your both at fault. But the scale will slightly tilt at the plumber for being more at fault.

                            Now call me stupid on this one, Plumber telling who ever to go ahead and put up the drywall, is there something wrong with that picture. What about inspection. I must be missing a lot to this story, so I should just stay quiet, for now.....
                            I agree with Garager on this one, if I'm the General, I'm checking to my satisfaction before things proceed because ultimately it's my call to go forward even though my sub tells me it's okay. Sounds like you're in charge as you did your inspection and didn't exactly like the outcome. I've done that too - consider it a lesson learned because you'll inspect from now on,

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: You can put up your drywall now.

                              Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                              OMG! 300 psi? Adam That's a little overkill for residential domestic don't you think?

                              We would only do a hydrostatic pressure test like that on a fire main

                              Glad I'm not the one cutting the first copper cap off. Might hurt somebody.
                              My pipes will be tested
                              What happens to a guy who is not paying attention/supervised.
                              A plumber sends his helper to find a sewer stub out somewhere around the panel sweep.The plumber assumes the entire panel feed is encased.
                              POW!!! His helper is now a 5'-10" piece of standing black bacon.
                              There are hazards everywhere.From stepping on nails to ending up on a gurny cause you hit 440.

                              Hauling a hydro up an elevator to test progress piping eats up resources.CO2 works fast.It gets bled out after confermation of integrity.Only takes a few minutes.I try to make everyone onsite aware of what's going on."Stay away from the copper for a few minutes"

                              Thank you for bringing attention to those on the forum how important this is Crack

                              ADAM

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