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  • flange too tall for new toilet

    I recently remodeled our bathroom, replacing the floor and setting tile. The new floor is about 1/8" lower that the original. The flange is about 1/2" above the floor, good enough for the old toilet but not the new. I should have checked! What is the easiest way for me to lower the flange without breaking some tile? I've got cast iron pipes. Can I cut the pipe and add PVC? I've got a reciprocating saw. Please help me out, my wife needs to go to the bathroom! lol

  • #2
    Re: flange too tall for new toilet

    the best way is to split the old flange and remove the lead and oakum. then install a new instant set closet flange. this tightens a rubber gasket to compress against the wall of the cast iron.

    you might need to cut or grind the cast to the flush level of the flange when finished.

    if grinding, use a vac to prevent the cast from rusting onto the tile and grout. safety glasses

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: flange too tall for new toilet

      Thanks. What is the easiest way to split the flange? I've never dealt with the cast iron before. This flange looks pretty big to me.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: flange too tall for new toilet

        The lead needs to be removed.I have tried a couple of ways,either melting or digging(picking) the 3/4-1-11/2 of lead out then remove the oakum(similar to horsehair).then just lift the flange off the pipe.I like Westcoast's Idea of drilling the lead then pick out excess.

        Once the flange is off you can lower the pipe with a 4-1/2" or 5" angle grinder.

        If it is older cast iron you can cut vertical notches with a sawsall and carbide blade or skillsaw with the same to the depth needed leaving 3/4" pieces you can break off with a large crescent wrench.


        ADAM

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        • #5
          Re: flange too tall for new toilet

          Take a sharp cold chisel and strike the flange edge, vertically.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Re: flange too tall for new toilet

            If you can remove enough of the flange.Smack the crap out of it with a GOOD hammer and chisel.

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            • #7
              Re: flange too tall for new toilet

              Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
              If you can remove enough of the flange.Smack the crap out of it with a GOOD hammer and chisel.
              How is a GOOD hammer different from a framing hammer
              I love my plumber

              "My Hero"

              Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                I'm not going to use my good frammmming hamer to beat steel.I need it's waffle to bite sixteens.I don't want to turn it into a thumb crusher cause it keeps skidding off the nail.

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                • #9
                  Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                  BAD HAMMER,GO LAY DOWN IN THE CORNER!! Sounds like Moma Misses Her Hubby
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                    MrsSeatDown How is a GOOD hammer different from a framing hammer
                    a framing hammer has a special face on it so it will not slip off of nails, see picture below,

                    jsut as there are different tools for many jobs, such as drain cleaning machines, there are different hammers for different "striking" applications.

                    such a ball peen hammers, claw hammers, framing hammers, black smith hammers, tack hammers, horse shoeing hammers, there are many different hammers for many different jobs,

                    some is the size the shape, the weight the configuration, type of head and so on.

                    so the picture below is a picture of the face of the framing hammer, and it usually weighs in the 20+ ounce range,
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                    • #11
                      Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                      Originally posted by BHD View Post
                      a framing hammer has a special face on it so it will not slip off of nails, see picture below,

                      jsut as there are different tools for many jobs, such as drain cleaning machines, there are different hammers for different "striking" applications.

                      such a ball peen hammers, claw hammers, framing hammers, black smith hammers, tack hammers, horse shoeing hammers, there are many different hammers for many different jobs,

                      some is the size the shape, the weight the configuration, type of head and so on.

                      so the picture below is a picture of the face of the framing hammer, and it usually weighs in the 20+ ounce range,

                      Thanks, but I was just teasing.

                      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...ramming+hammer
                      I love my plumber

                      "My Hero"

                      Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                        I ran into the same thing when I replaced the old toilet with a new low-volume one. I jacked the new toilet up on some 3/8" plywood spacers and then grouted the gap.

                        Originally posted by fishin49 View Post
                        I recently remodeled our bathroom, replacing the floor and setting tile. The new floor is about 1/8" lower that the original. The flange is about 1/2" above the floor, good enough for the old toilet but not the new. I should have checked! What is the easiest way for me to lower the flange without breaking some tile? I've got cast iron pipes. Can I cut the pipe and add PVC? I've got a reciprocating saw. Please help me out, my wife needs to go to the bathroom! lol
                        Steve
                        www.MorrisGarage.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                          Originally posted by smorris View Post
                          I ran into the same thing when I replaced the old toilet with a new low-volume one. I jacked the new toilet up on some 3/8" plywood spacers and then grouted the gap.
                          Tell me this isn't so . You can restore your vehicles and you can't lower a closet flange?

                          Mark
                          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: flange too tall for new toilet

                            Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                            Tell me this isn't so . You can restore your vehicles and you can't lower a closet flange?

                            Mark
                            Absolutely true. I grew up on a farm, so mechanical stuff comes easy. But a toilet was any convenient chunk of grass. Prior to that, I'd never seen under a toilet before. I've done plenty of sinks, water heaters, frost-free faucets, etc. Just no toilets.

                            (Note there are no plywood shims or jacks in any of my car repairs unless that's what was in there originally.)
                            Steve
                            www.MorrisGarage.com

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