Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Indirect Water Heater Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Indirect Water Heater

    In the pro plumbing section there is a pricing thread talking about water heaters. It seems that people think electric is easiest and indirect is difficult? If I understand it correctly, an indirect is one that is fed off of your main boiler. I have one lik that and when I got an 80 gallon tank to replace the 40, it took a bit more than an hour. If there is no high voltage or gas to hook up, just the low-voltage wires why is this kind harder?

    Also, why does it take so long to drain them? I didn't notice the guy waiting to drain my 40 gallon one. He hooked it up to the hose very first thing, and let it go out the yard. I think it drained in something under 10 minutes.

  • #2
    Re: Indirect Water Heater

    Originally posted by cpw View Post
    In the pro plumbing section there is a pricing thread talking about water heaters. It seems that people think electric is easiest and indirect is difficult? If I understand it correctly, an indirect is one that is fed off of your main boiler. I have one lik that and when I got an 80 gallon tank to replace the 40, it took a bit more than an hour. If there is no high voltage or gas to hook up, just the low-voltage wires why is this kind harder?

    Also, why does it take so long to drain them? I didn't notice the guy waiting to drain my 40 gallon one. He hooked it up to the hose very first thing, and let it go out the yard. I think it drained in something under 10 minutes.
    If you are talking about a swap out, it is not that much more difficult, but take into consideration that you have 4 pipes instead of 2 to disconnect and re-hook up. Hot, cold and boiler supply and return. Also take into consideration that chances are your new tappings will be in a different location, unless it is the exact smae brand and model, and even then things may change.

    An 80 gallon indirect is a very big size for indirects. Unless you live in a mansion, you are probably way oversized. Most houses in Westchester will use a 40 or 50 gallon indirect. They are not sized the same as "conventional" heaters.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Indirect Water Heater

      Originally posted by Masterplumb View Post
      If you are talking about a swap out, it is not that much more difficult, but take into consideration that you have 4 pipes instead of 2 to disconnect and re-hook up. Hot, cold and boiler supply and return. Also take into consideration that chances are your new tappings will be in a different location, unless it is the exact smae brand and model, and even then things may change.

      An 80 gallon indirect is a very big size for indirects. Unless you live in a mansion, you are probably way oversized. Most houses in Westchester will use a 40 or 50 gallon indirect. They are not sized the same as "conventional" heaters.
      It was the same brand (Energy Kinetics, System 2000), so the pipe locations did need to change a bit, but not too much. We started with a 40, but when we filled the large tub in our master bath the 40 would run out part way through. The 80 gallon solves the problem of the really big surge. The plumber that we had check it out said that a plumber would have known to size it bigger, but that the oil company which installed it didn't or the previous owner just went cheap on it. Frank & Lindy said that the bigger tank only costs $500 when you install it w/ the boiler, but the after the fact upgrade was $2000.

      Now we have plenty of hot water (something like the 80 gallons + something like 200 recharge/hr).

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Indirect Water Heater

        Originally posted by cpw View Post
        It was the same brand (Energy Kinetics, System 2000), so the pipe locations did need to change a bit, but not too much. We started with a 40, but when we filled the large tub in our master bath the 40 would run out part way through. The 80 gallon solves the problem of the really big surge. The plumber that we had check it out said that a plumber would have known to size it bigger, but that the oil company which installed it didn't or the previous owner just went cheap on it. Frank & Lindy said that the bigger tank only costs $500 when you install it w/ the boiler, but the after the fact upgrade was $2000.

        Now we have plenty of hot water (something like the 80 gallons + something like 200 recharge/hr).
        I am not familiar with your system, but I can tell you that 200 gal the first hr is not that much for an 80 gal.
        Last edited by Masterplumb; 05-20-2008, 05:11 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Indirect Water Heater

          Originally posted by Masterplumb View Post
          I am not familiar with your system, but I can tell you that 200 gal the first hr is way too much.
          They could be boosting their numbers with a rise that isn't realistic here:
          http://www.energykinetics.com/specifications.html
          Domestic Water - 195 gallons per hour (77°F rise in temperature)

          If you believe the 121,000 BTU/hr number it works out to 198 gallons at 77 degrees. (1 BTU raises 1 lbs. 1 degree, so 121,000 BTU does 15,250 gallon-degrees, divide by 77 degrees, and we get 196 gallons).

          Also, if the house is heating, then that will drop since some of the heat goes to the house instead of the water heater (it supposedly has priority, but I don't know how that can work if both are circulating at the same time, the only thing I can guess is that the late heat exchanger is much more efficient than the baseboards).

          Even if the #s arent' perfect, I can tell you that the system really can crank out the hot water. Once the upgrade was done we've never once run out even.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Indirect Water Heater

            Originally posted by cpw View Post
            They could be boosting their numbers with a rise that isn't realistic here:
            http://www.energykinetics.com/specifications.html
            Domestic Water - 195 gallons per hour (77°F rise in temperature)

            If you believe the 121,000 BTU/hr number it works out to 198 gallons at 77 degrees. (1 BTU raises 1 lbs. 1 degree, so 121,000 BTU does 15,250 gallon-degrees, divide by 77 degrees, and we get 196 gallons).

            Also, if the house is heating, then that will drop since some of the heat goes to the house instead of the water heater (it supposedly has priority, but I don't know how that can work if both are circulating at the same time, the only thing I can guess is that the late heat exchanger is much more efficient than the baseboards).

            Even if the #s arent' perfect, I can tell you that the system really can crank out the hot water. Once the upgrade was done we've never once run out even.
            I meant to say that it's not that much. My Crown Mega Stor 40(ms-40) gal gives almost the same 172 gal
            http://www.crownboiler.com/products/...astor_prnt.asp

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Indirect Water Heater

              I have a Weil-McLain 40 Gal Gold Plus and with two daughters in their early twenties and the wife they can not run that thing out of hot water. The hot water is generated with a oil-fired boiler.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Indirect Water Heater

                The System 2000 has a priority control which will only allow the hot water storage tank to circulate and the heat zones will not untill the tank is satisfied. The tank is only a storage vessel. The water is heated using a stainless steel plate exchanger. (very efficient) The best way to increase volume is to increase the size of the plate exchanger and the tank. These units will put out an incredible amount of hot water.
                sigpic

                Comment

                Working...
                X