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  • Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

    A management company wants to add booster pumps to 3 buildings.

    Each building has a new 2" water service installed 3 years ago

    Static pressure is 60 lbs. read before the backflow preventer.

    4 story building 40 feet high. Top floor pressure should be what? 45 lbs. static?

    There is some loss in pressure though the backflow, right?

    Here's the problem. During heavy usage in the early mornings and evenings pressure to top floors suffer. (Sorry I don't have the numbers) It's so bad some are unable to shower.

    WASA (D.C. Water and Sewer Authority) says nothing they can do to increase pressure. The problem is system wide. Too much new development in this area without the proper infrastructure.

    So my question is how does one go about sizing a booster pump system and who makes a good pump? Money is not a concern here.

    Each building has 35 units all with 1 bath (standard tank type toilets) laundry in basement, no irrigation
    Last edited by plumberscrack; 05-28-2008, 05:25 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

    What pressure do you want on the first floor?
    Are you going to be able to regulate lower floors if you want more than eighty down there?
    Last edited by drtyhands; 05-28-2008, 06:21 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

      I made a phone call to my pump guy.
      Are you able to go three phase?
      The technology now will allow you to go with Variable Frequency Drive(VFR).It is a far more efficient motor/system.
      Last edited by drtyhands; 05-28-2008, 06:45 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

        Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
        What pressure do you want on the first floor?
        Are you going to be able to regulate lower floors if you want more than eighty down there?
        Screw the lower floors. It's the top floors that are bitchin'

        Yea no problem. I can make even more money selling PRV's to the condo owners.

        Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
        I made a phone call to my pump guy.
        Are you able to go three phase?
        The technology now will allow you to go with Variable Frequency Drive(VFR).It is a far more efficient motor.
        I used to have a pump guy. I wonder where he is I guess you are my pump guy now

        No just single phase. Is VFR only availible in 3 phase?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

          O/K 220?

          Riser stack or individual branch stacks?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

            220v good

            Riser stacks

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

              40' @ .434 per foot in height adds to just over 17, incoming is 60.
              Assuming max psi in your code is 80, you could get away with a booster and not have to use prv's on the lower floor.
              I'm guessing your customers just not happy with flow on the top floor, it's just about 43 psi.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                220v good

                Riser stacks
                Pick one

                A.Unit risers
                B.fixture risers

                I am assuming they are unit as we think we can resolve through boosting/regulating lowers?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                  Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                  40' @ .434 per foot in height adds to just over 17, incoming is 60.
                  Assuming max psi in your code is 80, you could get away with a booster and not have to use prv's on the lower floor.
                  I'm guessing your customers just not happy with flow on the top floor, it's just about 43 psi.
                  You know how it is Ducky. You get a bunch of DINKS with bathrooms bigger than my bedroom. They all wanted champagne ceiling mounted dinner plate size showerheads. The problem only exists during peak usage. All other times it's adequate

                  Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                  Pick one

                  A.Unit risers
                  B.fixture risers

                  I am assuming they are unit as we think we can resolve through boosting/regulating lowers?
                  Unit

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                    Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                    You know how it is Ducky. You get a bunch of DINKS with bathrooms bigger than my bedroom. They all wanted champagne ceiling mounted dinner plate size showerheads. The problem only exists during peak usage. All other times it's adequate



                    Unit
                    Oops, I stand corrected, you need a 40psi boost, with prvs all over the place in the first two floors.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                      Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                      Oops, I stand corrected, you need a 40psi boost, with prvs all over the place in the first two floors.
                      I only want to boost the pressure when it drops too low. Pumping it up to knock it back down again doesn't seem right to me

                      Feed me... I'm a sponge

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                      • #12
                        Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                        Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                        You know how it is Ducky. You get a bunch of DINKS with bathrooms bigger than my bedroom. They all wanted champagne ceiling mounted dinner plate size showerheads. The problem only exists during peak usage. All other times it's adequate



                        Unit
                        Best we can do on my end is have a pump number with amps and GPM's tommorrow.It's too late for my loop.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                          Just for the record.The three phase VFD's don't need a tank,just a bladder.The system is digitally controlled to only pump usage.It ramps up based on demand(1 shower or all 35 units) versus full on/full off for 1 shower.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                            I am not disagreeing with dirtyhands on the use of a pump with a VFD. However, a VFD can only ramp down so far. I would look into a duplex or triplex (probalby just a duplex) system with PRV's on the lower floors if deemed necessary.

                            Regards,

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Sizing Commercial Booster Pumps

                              Both Goulds and Grundfos publish the information you need on their web sites.
                              sigpic

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