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Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

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  • Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

    I have a 20+ year old angle stop valve under a toilet that won't shut off the water when closed. I plan to replace it with a new quarter-turn valve. I already removed the old valve but now I have some questions which I can't find any definite answers to. Seems like everyone has a different opinion.

    1. The ferrule won't come off, should I try to pull it off with a compression sleeve puller tool?

    2. Should I leave the old compression nut and ferrule on the pipe and use them with a new valve?

    3. Should I put pipe compound or teflon tape on the threads of the valve or on the ferrule or not at all?

  • #2
    Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

    Some I leave, some i pull off. If you pull it off, and it stretches the pipe, you wiull need to solder on an MIP, and use an IPS stop

    You can also slide the nut back, and cut the ferral, then split it off with a flat head, if you have the room. do not cut the pipe.

    If the threads match up, then you can also use the old nut, I have done this from time to time. I inspect the condition of the farrell and the nut before I do this though, to make sure it is all good, not corroded or split.
    sigpic

    Robert

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    • #3
      Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

      Some times the threads are uniform and you may be able to just thread the new angle stop onto the old nut and ferrule.I've pulled hundreds and added new compression stop on same pipe.Have not had ANY problems,I guess I'm a pretty lucky guy huh?

      Pipe dope on the male threads will help you get it tighter.

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      • #4
        Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

        Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
        Some times the threads are uniform and you may be able to just thread the new angle stop onto the old nut and ferrule.I've pulled hundreds and added new compression stop on same pipe.Have not had ANY problems,I guess I'm a pretty lucky guy huh?

        Pipe dope on the male threads will help you get it tighter.


        Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggggggg............... ......
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

          Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
          [/color][/b]

          Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggggggg............... ......

          what

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          • #6
            Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

            Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
            [/color][/b]

            Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggggggg............... ......
            WHAT

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            • #7
              Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

              what

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              • #8
                Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                If you were to read the instructions on a Brasscraft valve, it tells you not to use pipe dope on the threads, but to use a drop of oil.

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                • #9
                  Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                  Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                  what
                  I often find it easier to avoid discussion of technique with you west coasters...I guess some of us do things different.
                  He'd just posted a response to not liking dope on unions or water because it can clog valves & aerators.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                    Holy $hit, how much pipe dope are you people using. If you are clogging valves and aerators you have a serious addiction. When I mention pipe dope, I am talking about a small amount on the contacting surfaces. Use the pipe dope when installing compression fittings, you will be glad you did. Oh, back to your question. If there is enough room, slide the compression nut back and just grab the ferrule with your adjustable pliers and turn/wiggle it off of the pipe. No sense in buying another tool.
                    Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                      pipe dope on the male thread is fine. all it's doing is acting as a lubricant. the threads are non tapered straight machine threads.

                      depending on the original brand of shut off valve, the new compression nut might not be the same size and thread.

                      a puller makes it simple and safe to remove.

                      typically on type l stubs the ferrule doesn't bite into the copper like on type m copper.

                      i guarantee that when i installed 10's of thousands of angle stops, they were not coming off. in the old days i had to cut and split the compression nut to access the brass ferrule. then cut the ferrule. not a simple job especially when access was tight.

                      today a puller turns an awkward job into a basic 30 second swap.

                      by the way, the best lubricant for short and long term tightening and removing is regular bowl wax. a 50 cent bowl wax can lube thousands of stops.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

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                      • #12
                        Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                        I give up.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                          Well I found the same brand valve (brass craft) at Home Depot, except a quarter-turn version. The old compression nut matched up so I tried it first with a light amount of joint compound on the threads. It dripped water after I turned the water back on. So then I tightened it up a little more and it still dripped.

                          After this I took it off again and reapplied compound on the threads, covering them better, and I also applied some to the compression ring itself. I tightened it a little tighter and it does not leak now.

                          However in the DIY book I have it specifically says not to use joint compound, it calls for the use a small amount of oil on the threads. It says the old compression ring should be removed every time the fitting comes off (but no advice on how to remove it).

                          Anyway it seems to work so I guess I will keep an eye on it.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                            Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                            I give up.
                            What's buggin' ya sunshine.



                            Did I miss something?

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                            • #15
                              Re: Replacing shut-off valve under toilet

                              For a two dollar supply tube, why would'nt you just replace it also?

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