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  • Leaking shutoff

    I’m installing a new vanity top – actually I posted another thread about this

    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=18257

    Anyway I’ve now installed the faucets. However, I’m having an issue with one of the shutoffs. As a related point I do live in a very hard water area and although I installed a whole house softener about 4 years ago prior to that (house is about 12 years old) there was hard water in the house. Anyway the hot water shutoff was very hard to turn (I guess scaled up internally). After working it back and forth a few times I was able to turn it off and get the faucets installed.

    However, now it leaks when it is turned on. I guess the easiest thing is to replace it. But the connection to the copper pipe (1/2”) coming out of the wall is a compression fitting. Can I simply undo the compression nut and then connect the new shutoff using the existing nut and sleeve. I’m sure the sleeve is not going to come off the pipe. It will be hard to cut the pipe to install a new sleeve as the cut will be very close to the wall. I thought about cutting the sleeve off and then sweating on a stub of pipe using a connection sleeve and then working off that but it is still very close to the wall.

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Re: Leaking shutoff

    Where exactly does it leak from? Any pics? Nice countertop btw. Not bad for an engineer.
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Leaking shutoff

      Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
      Not bad for an engineer.
      we are not all that bad!

      Here is a pic of what's going on

      It's just a drip and is coming from behind the front nut. I tried tightening it a little bit but it made it a bit worse.

      Can it be disassembled and fixed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Leaking shutoff

        Shut the main water off to the house. Then take the valve apart and re-pack the stem. You can get packing at any hardware store.
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Leaking shutoff

          It can be fixed, but easier to just install a new CR19 quarter-turn stop. Might as well replace both of them while you're at it.
          Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Leaking shutoff

            i think, if it were me, i'd just cut it off and use the existing nut and brass compression ring gooped up with a little pipe dope. if that proves unsuccessful........then you'll have to blast!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Leaking shutoff

              Yes, I was also thinking it would be easier to install a new one - my concern was about not being able to get the compression sleeve off. Is it okay to use the existing nut and sleeve. How do you guys normally change these out. What's a CR19?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Leaking shutoff

                Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                I’m installing a new vanity top – actually I posted another thread about this

                http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=18257

                Anyway I’ve now installed the faucets. However, I’m having an issue with one of the shutoffs. As a related point I do live in a very hard water area and although I installed a whole house softener about 4 years ago prior to that (house is about 12 years old) there was hard water in the house. Anyway the hot water shutoff was very hard to turn (I guess scaled up internally). After working it back and forth a few times I was able to turn it off and get the faucets installed.

                However, now it leaks when it is turned on. I guess the easiest thing is to replace it. But the connection to the copper pipe (1/2”) coming out of the wall is a compression fitting. Can I simply undo the compression nut and then connect the new shutoff using the existing nut and sleeve. I’m sure the sleeve is not going to come off the pipe. It will be hard to cut the pipe to install a new sleeve as the cut will be very close to the wall. I thought about cutting the sleeve off and then sweating on a stub of pipe using a connection sleeve and then working off that but it is still very close to the wall.

                Any suggestions?
                You can simply take the compression nut off the old valve and thread on a new shutoff valve as long as the treads match . Use a pipe dope or teflon tape on the treads to help seal and make it easier to take apart in the future. If the threads dont match slide the nut back and grab the ferrel with some channel locks dont sqeeze to tightly but firm enough to work slowly back and forth until you get it off the pipe. Then just use what came with your new stop.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Leaking shutoff

                  OK thanks - I'll go get a new shutoff and take it from there.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Leaking shutoff

                    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                    Yes, I was also thinking it would be easier to install a new one - my concern was about not being able to get the compression sleeve off. Is it okay to use the existing nut and sleeve. How do you guys normally change these out. What's a CR19?
                    99 percent of the time you can reuse the nut and sleeve, but it looks like you have enough room to push the nut back and gently grab the sleeve with a pair of adjustable pliers (Channel Lock). Make sure when you do put the new stop on to be sure and use some pipe dope on the mating surfaces (a little goes a long ways). In my area something like changing two shutoffs would be around $75 including material. However, I am not allowed to touch those so you would have to call someone licensed. A cr19 is a chrome 5/8" x 3/8" compression angle stop.
                    Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Leaking shutoff

                      ^
                      J.c.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Leaking shutoff

                        There's a plumber somewhere in SD answering his phone and saying..."You want me to change two stops for HOW MUCH?!?"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Leaking shutoff

                          Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                          There's a plumber somewhere in SD answering his phone and saying..."You want me to change two stops for HOW MUCH?!?"
                          Hmmm...this is so true - it's many years since I hired anyone to work on my house or cars so I don't know about the price but I have a feelling it is going to be a lot higher around here.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Leaking shutoff

                            If the threads on the old and new angle stop don't match, you can always use a sleeve puller to remove the old sleeve without damaging the copper pipe.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Leaking shutoff

                              Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                              Hmmm...this is so true - it's many years since I hired anyone to work on my house or cars so I don't know about the price but I have a feelling it is going to be a lot higher around here.


                              customers have a hard time understanding the cost of alot of things now adays. they forget gas is like 4.65 a gallon now....and material, our water heaters are going up 15% july 1st.

                              a standard 40 gallon costs 392.00 right now.

                              anyways, paying a plumber to replace 2 stops and getting it done right, is still better then having a flood when your not home
                              sigpic

                              Robert

                              Comment

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