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  • Running water lines from house to barn

    Hello all,
    We need to get running water from our house to our barn, which is about 300 ft away (shortest route). We were going to hire someone, but having difficulty finding anyone so thinking we will tackle it ourselves (I would say my husband has basic handyman plumbing skills). We need to go across a seasonal creek which has 30' span (no water in it most of the time). We are having a bridge built of steel H beams and wood walkway and plan to run the water line under the bridge, attached to underside (would be way too difficult to get lines dug under the creek bed we think). At the barn, we plan to have a couple of those frost free spigots, one outside, one inside, for filling water buckets, giving horse a bath, etc. No sink/toilet there. We have city water. We are in Middle TN (new to this area), so believe there is not too much frost but we would plan on putting the lines 2' below ground level, I think that should be okay for winter.
    Can anyone tell us what type of material we should use for the piping? I assume PVC or I have read of something called CPVC also, but how large in diameter? Also, would it be the same material running under the bridge or should that be metal pipe? Assume we need some type of insulation wrap around it under the bridge.
    Thanks so much for any help you can provide!

  • #2
    Re: Running water lines from house to barn

    don't know what you have for pressure and volume there but cost wise, due to the length of the run I would run at least 1" poyethelyne well pipe. You can get it in 100-300-and 500 foot rolls at a reasonable price.
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Re: Running water lines from house to barn

      polyethylene well pipe does well, if it is rocky tho some times sharp rocks can work there way in to the pipe and cause leaks in time,

      I have over 3000 feet of 1' polyethylene well pipe on my place and it has been in over 9 years. and not a problem, and it has some pulsating pressure on it. It is a water line from a windmill, and the windmill pumps the water through it, to a storage tank at the house.

      I have also ran about the same amount of 1" or 1 1/4" PVC pipe a little over 1/2 mile to a stock tank in the pasture, and as of yet no problems and it has been in about 12 to 15 years, ( I do not remember the size )

      If the size large enough so you do not have much pipe losses, you will have good flow and pressures
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Re: Running water lines from house to barn

        I am just wondering if you are putting in Frostproof Spigots due to the fact that the pipes may freeze how are you going to protect the pipe from freezing on the underside of the bridge wher more the likely the pipe will be exposed to the elements.
        Im in Ohio so our winters can be pretty brutal therefore our water lines need to be a minimum of 4 feet underground
        Usually in situations such as your we still excavate through a creek bed and instead of frostproof silcocks we put in bury hydrants
        I would check with your local plumbers or code officials to figure out the best way to handle your project
        Plus having city water you will more than likely have to add a backflow device to the line going to the barn. Best to check locally to see what you need to do

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        • #5
          Re: Running water lines from house to barn

          Hardly worth all the effort just for a few hosebibbs

          What's it cost these days to drill a shallow well?

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          • #6
            Re: Running water lines from house to barn

            You are crossing an auxillary water source, so you will need to install a r.p backflow at the city main in house--auxillary water means possible cross connection and the epa does not like that--protect the city and yourself and have a plumber install and test the backflow and have him install a check valve where you tee off the houseline to prevent outside water from backflow
            better safe than sorry and sick-i also would run poly pipe minimum 1"-and the bridge area--if you get below freezing,insulation alone wont help against a driving 20 degree wind--youd need heattape there also--is there no way to trench through the creek if its dry and quickly bury it???

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            • #7
              Re: Running water lines from house to barn

              Plumbers crack . How do You know a shallow well is possible there? I have done 7 shallow and deep wells in the past.
              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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              • #8
                Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
                Plumbers crack . How do You know a shallow well is possible there? I have done 7 shallow and deep wells in the past.
                Tool,I don't know how much a well costs.Is anyone interested in giving me/us an idea the difference between what's the difference between shallow and deep.After purchasing permanent pump equipment,running surface plumbing,I wonder what it takes to have the drill contractor go 100' deeper.How far off am I at high ball increase of 20%.

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                • #9
                  Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                  in New York my well driller charges $14 a foot to drill and $24 a foot for casing, plus a 4 to 5 hundred dollar mobilization fee then figure about 2.5k to set up the pump, tank and controls

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                  • #10
                    Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                    my wells are 260 plus feet, there is no shallow water, in our area, not that that is that deep but it is deep enough,

                    ~~~~~~~~~

                    if the creek is dry a lot of the times I bet you could back hoe through it unless the terrain is really bad,

                    ~~~~~~~~~

                    this would be a little extra pipe, run two runs of the pipe, run the pipe through a support pipe and insulate it , back at the house put a circulating pump on it, most of the pipe will be under ground, if you want when it gets cold switch on the circulating pump or (you could hook it to a line voltage thermostat set for about 35 degrees), and the water will loop thought the ground keeping it warm and moving, as it goes over the bridge and back into the ground and then let loop back around again through the system, let it make a complete loop from end to end all 300 feet, it should keep it from freezing, unless you really have some wicked weather. and if the pipe is protected (insulated and in a support pipe under the bridge),

                    if it really gets cold one can turn on a hydrant and let it fast drip or run very slow if necessary,

                    or one could probly set it up to drain the pipe out or blow it out depending on the elevations and such,
                    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                    attributed to Samuel Johnson
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                      just bury it deep enough--there are lots of things you could do,but what if you have an emergency then come home to find a disaster?? bury the pipe 4 feet and all underground and u wont have to drain this or leave this on or blow this out, etc---just do it right---DEEP AND ALL UNDERGROUND

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                      • #12
                        Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                        Thanks for all the suggestions. As to a well, it sounds a bit costly and also the ground is a bit rocky so not sure how that would work out, but perhaps we can look into it. I think it is impossible to dig under the creek bed. That is what we planned to do initially and had a few quotes for doing that, but the guy we chose delayed things so much and then we just never heard back from him. However, since then, we have had a few flash floods go through. The force of this water is quite severe when it comes through (99% of the time the creek is dry) and tree limbs and whatever else someone has thrown into the bed upstream come down. It has moved the rocks, etc. underneath to the point where we can see what I guess you would call shale - what appears to be very large flat grey rock. Someone who lives in the area told us that is the bottom of the creek and it would not be very easy, if at all, to try to remove that/get through it. So we really think digging under the creek bed is out.
                        I should mention this creek bed is probably at least 8' deep, if I stand in it, I am completely below ground level. Additionally, there are trees lining the creek, so the plumber that was going to do the work at one point felt it would be difficult to get through the tree roots. So...this is why we feel running it under a bridge is our best bet. IF for some reason the lines did freeze a couple of times, I could live with not having the water running for a few days a year, provided of course the freezing didn't cause permanent damage we'd have to repair. At this location, the water has never come to the top/ground level, but you can never be sure what will happen with the weather, of course. It has probably been a few feet from the top, given how the tree roots look on the sides.
                        BHD, your idea sounds good. We have only been here for one winter, but the weather is pretty mild IMO, it did get to 9 degrees as low a few times, but not much cold wind or snow or ice. The plumber had mentioned some type of insulation wrapped around it under the bridge. What type of pipe would you use for the above-ground/bridge section?
                        Thanks!

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                        • #13
                          Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                          you can also have someone directionally bore the whole line in poly pipe--then there is no trench--and its not that expensive compared to other routes--call a directional boring company, most like to do small jobs b/c they can get in and out quick--my boring guy has bored under buildings to get us water before---if u want it there they will get it there---i just would not run pipe above ground if the temp gets below 35 degrees--heattape and insulation dont always work

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                          • #14
                            Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                            The directional boring sounds like a great idea if it is not too cost-prohibitive for us (never heard of it but just looked it up on the internet), AND if I can find someone around here that does it. At this point, our horses will be here tomorrow so we'll be running a hose from the house until we can figure this out, but I like the idea of no trench since we do have to run the water line through the horse field and we would have had to be very careful to make sure the ground is compacted very well so they do not step in any loose soil.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Running water lines from house to barn

                              i think the boring way may be out if the boring head hits one of the gray rocks it will go in a different direction

                              how about run an under electric line with the water line and then at the creek put heat tape and insulate the pipes and the heat tape can come with a thermostat that will turn it on when the temp gets cold out to the freezing point

                              thats what i would do then you can put a light on the bridge and make it look nice
                              Charlie

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