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  • how often do you run in to things like this?

    last night after dark the neighbor missed the corner with his semi truck and ran over the mail box, and drove so far down in the ditch, (wonder that he did not dump the truck over on it side) took out the water hydrant as well and water was shooting up out of the ground, so I have a mail box to straighten and to put back up and a water hydrant to dig out and replace, the head of the hydrant was destroyed, ( could not even find all the cast iron pieces) and the pipe was bent over, (I hope the pipe in the ground was not damaged), as the hydrant pipe is laying flat, currently I am not need that line, and shut off the valve to it, he jsut missed the Rail road tie I put in to protect the hydrant from farm equipment from the other side. He was clear off the road by the time he hit the hydrant.

    I may call the county and see if they will bring out a truck load of fill and move the mail box back off the edge of the road,

    some times I get so tired of having to jsut fix things.
    The Hydrant is for a stock tank currently not using it.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

  • #2
    Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

    what was he drinking

    the neighbor should help you in the repairs and at least pay for the damaged parts.

    you can eat your labor, but he should put in the same amout of time as you.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

      He has offered to pay for the repairs,
      He is about 80 and can't see to good in the day light alone at night,

      but the mail box gets knocked down about twice a year, last year another semi backed over it turning around in the intersection during corn harvest,, the county mower man gets it, other farmers and there wide equipment get it, it is off the edge of the road but still seems to be a target, I have reflectors on it and it is off the edge of the road way, at lest no one has purposely knocked it down, (which happens some times).

      I will say this is the first time for the hydrant tho, it is about 15 feet off the road and down in a ditch about 4' below the roads surface,

      Country life is fun,
      Last edited by BHD; 09-24-2008, 12:57 PM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

        Originally posted by BHD View Post
        at lest no one has purposely knocked it down, (which happens some times).
        That would happen at my parents house. My current mailbox is encased in brick/concrete. It will certainly stand up to a kid with a baseball bat (probably break their arm, rightly deserved) and the snow from a plow; but a semi is gonna knock anything down.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

          Hey BHD what do you farm in Colorado?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

            Originally posted by BHD View Post
            the mail box gets knocked down about twice a year,

            at lest no one has purposely knocked it down, (which happens some times).
            at my mom's old house there was a problem with kids "batting boxes" so she had a post & box made from drill stem. it's also planted 4 feet into the ground. vitrually indestructable!!

            she did find parts of a broken bat in the yard & street one morning. but no one complained about any broken bones or other injuries. the only damage to the box was the flag took a good beating

            BTW i'm glad no one got hurt in your incident BHD

            steve
            In the never ending struggle to keep the water flowing.... The Poo Poo Cowboy rides again!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

              run beef cattle cow calf, operation, have about 500 acres of grass land, and planted about 300 acres, back to grass a few years ago, and currently have about 300 acres of farm able ground, I raised dry land, (no irrigation) wheat, (hard red winter), and proso millet, (you would probly know it by bird seed, the little white round seeds in a bird seed mix), and some feed which I currently grow pearl millet, and bale it for the cattle in winter, it does well with little moisture.

              I have raised dry land corn in the past, (it jsut got to expensive to grow for the promise of a crop on dry land), some times sun flowers are raised as a secondary crop by some, but that is the main crops that are growable here, you can grow oats but it gets a little warm for a good crop, not enough moisture for many crops.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              one of the reasons I do not make the mail box indestructible is that if some one hits it some one could be killed, I could go plant a Rail road tie, and place the box on it, but I don't want some some killed by there stupidity or by there carelessness. and feel responsible for it in some way, and most of the time the county discourages it for those reasons. On a state road if you do set the mail box in "permanent" way, they the department of Roads will remove it for you. unless it is off of there right a way.

              I got the mail box pounded out and ready to replant it, and a new post, the back end of was smashed flat,

              I am glad my neighbor was not hurt either, it would really make one sick if he would have been,
              Last edited by BHD; 09-24-2008, 12:57 PM.
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                I hate to be mean, and it hurts an older person to be told they shouldn't do something the've always done, but at 80yrs with poor vision, what the heck does he think he's doing driving a big rig at night? Get him off the road. Next time it could be a person instead of a mailbox.
                This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                  Originally posted by BHD View Post
                  last night after dark the neighbor missed the corner with his semi truck and ran over the mail box, and drove so far down in the ditch, (wonder that he did not dump the truck over on it side) took out the water hydrant as well and water was shooting up out of the ground, so I have a mail box to straighten and to put back up and a water hydrant to dig out and replace, the head of the hydrant was destroyed, ( could not even find all the cast iron pieces) and the pipe was bent over, (I hope the pipe in the ground was not damaged), as the hydrant pipe is laying flat, currently I am not need that line, and shut off the valve to it, he jsut missed the Rail road tie I put in to protect the hydrant from farm equipment from the other side. He was clear off the road by the time he hit the hydrant.

                  I may call the county and see if they will bring out a truck load of fill and move the mail box back off the edge of the road,

                  some times I get so tired of having to jsut fix things.
                  The Hydrant is for a stock tank currently not using it.
                  That's what friends are for, to find you things to do.Enjoy my neighbors.
                  Kenneth Collier
                  Maintenance and Sewer

                  P.O. Box 9441
                  Jackson, MS 39206
                  (601) 613-2678 (Cell)
                  drainman881999@yahoo.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                    BHD , God Bless You and Family. You're a good Man! Not a lot of that going around these days.
                    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                      About 30+ years ago a local guy got very tired of replacing his mailbox and post.So he bought an old junk D2 still on its tracks painted it up like nice and new then mounted the mailbox on the side where the radiator sat.Its still there and all later owners of the place keep the old cat painted.That sure solved the mailbox replacement.
                      Sam

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                        Originally posted by threecreeks3 View Post
                        About 30+ years ago a local guy got very tired of replacing his mailbox and post.So he bought an old junk D2 still on its tracks painted it up like nice and new then mounted the mailbox on the side where the radiator sat.Its still there and all later owners of the place keep the old cat painted.That sure solved the mailbox replacement.
                        Sam
                        1. Starting a D2 - Remember the high speed gasoline engine / Pony Motors?
                        2. A quick drive out of a garage.
                        3. CAT D2 working - Best audio of the 3 videos

                        BHD, These are for you also. Some time back a good friend of mine out in the country had an old D6 and I remember all too well what it was like trying to first hand crank the Pony Motor and then using it to crank, crank and crank the Diesel main engine on a cold morning. Once it started it blew loads of "Clag" all over the place.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAHLJf35wS0

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP6UL...eature=related

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwiDE...eature=related
                        Last edited by Woussko; 09-26-2008, 04:37 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                          Woussko thank you for the videos,

                          It brought back memories, not of the actual running of the cats, but of stories of my mothers of running the 22 cat, (was a gas powered), but she helped dad with a lot of the field work when they were first married, and she would plow with the 22, and she talked about how it would pull dirt up on the tracks and throw it on you, my dad wore a straw hat similar to the last video as well, by the time I came the cats were sold and replaced with wheeled tractors, when it came time to replace the under carriage, the farmers decide the wheeled tractors were a better deal. still have the operators manual from my mother dads 22 Cat,

                          the neighbor still had one that had its engine freeze up from not draining out the water, and I would play on it for hours some times, for a young boy it was some thing that one could use there imagination on for hours, when we play army it was our tank and I do not know how many run ways and other thing I imagined I built with that old cat, (I think there was a John Wayne move, fighting Sea bees, that I had seen on TV when I was young and that inspired my imaginary construction and army play on that old cat 22.)
                          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                          attributed to Samuel Johnson
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                            We had 3 oliver gas tractors on the farm when I was a kid,all had cranks.I learned very fast how much cranks can hurt you.The oliver grader was the worest for hanging up.I was so small at the time I could barely crank any of them.They all had 6 volt starters which of course near never could start em when cold.I miss those days...NOT.The cletrac was the easiest with the bucket down you couldnt crank it so it was near always jump started with 12 volts lol.
                            Sam

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: how often do you run in to things like this?

                              threecreeks3,

                              I hadn't thought about our Oliver cletrack in years until you wrote about it. We had a wide track. We had a 135 acre wood lot and during the winter we cut pulp wood. When I was really young we skidded the wood out with horses. We bought a pair of mules that I was told could work better than the horses. I don't recall there being any difference but I was young. Since it was winter we had a main skid line that froze every night. After the wood was cut, with an old gear drive Craftsman chainsaw that weighed about as much as me, we limbed them out with an axe. My job was to drive the team and skid the wood out to the header. The horses/mules walked, one on each side of the main line pulling the tree that was within the frozen snow depression made by the trees in the days before. How many times I was 'hollared at' for riding the tree and not walking beside it I don't know, but it was a lot. When we got the cletrack I was sad because I couldn't ride the trees any more. What fun is it to sit on a tractor skidding trees when I could ride them.

                              During the spring and fall we used the 'crawler' to plow. I plowed in first gear with a horse drawn plow behind the cletrack because the ground was so rocky. I don't really remember a lot about that but I recall I had to pull a rope when I got to the end of the field that must have engaged a cam of some kind that raised the plow. I also remember something about horse drawn plows not being able to back up and how I got into trouble once by not paying attention and getting too close to the hedgerow at the end of the field and couldn't back the thing up.

                              The last time I was by the old place the cletrack was sitting out rusting next to the old John Deere 'A', the 'B' and the Ferguson. I don't remember it ever being called a Massey Ferugson, just a Ferguson, maybe it was before some type of merger. We bought it and the 'A' new in 1946, the year I was born. They are probably worth more today than when they were bought new. But, they will never be sold because the prevailing wisdom still is, 'If they are worth that much to someone else they are worth that much to me to keep 'em.'

                              Probably hard times compared to today but for a kid that life was great. I would saddle up and get the cows in with my own horse even though they would come if you called them. I remember riding around looking for cows that had calved and didn't come in with the rest of them. I cold find the cows easily enough but sometimes the calves would be in brush and it took a little effort to find them. I was always told the cows hid the calves but I think it was more a circumstance of where the calf was born. I was 'Riddin' the range.' LOL

                              -Tom
                              Last edited by Tom W; 09-27-2008, 08:58 AM.

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