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  • Ask This Old House

    On Ask This Old House, the viewer tip was that you could cut PVC with mason line (basically the friction melts the pipe). I could just see JC vigorously pulling the string back and forth to avoid buying a saw.

    The other thing I noticed is that while installing a water filter, Richard had the guy cut copper pipe with a hack saw instead of a tubing cutter (what was even weirder was that it looked like the guy had a tubing cutter hanging on the wall).

  • #2
    Re: Ask This Old House

    Missed it today. And I have done the string saw but I suck at it. Or maybe haven't done it enough. If you don't keep just the right pace the pipe melts back together. Then you have to do it again or the string gets melted into the pipe!

    Don't know why someone would use a hacksaw if they had a tubing cutter and the room to use it. Maybe they had some seconds to fill to make up the show.

    J.C.

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    • #3
      Re: Ask This Old House

      Sometimes a customer will fail to understand me when I say I am a drain specialist, and every once in a while I will take on a lilttle job out of my usual realm. I've found the string saw useful for hot tubs. In my albeit limited experience, hot tubs are the pinnacle of unserviceable access.
      This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

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      • #4
        Re: Ask This Old House

        Originally posted by cpw View Post
        On Ask This Old House, the viewer tip was that you could cut PVC with mason line (basically the friction melts the pipe). I could just see JC vigorously pulling the string back and forth to avoid buying a saw.

        The other thing I noticed is that while installing a water filter, Richard had the guy cut copper pipe with a hack saw instead of a tubing cutter (what was even weirder was that it looked like the guy had a tubing cutter hanging on the wall).

        Yup

        I also work in the swimming pool industry and we do this all the time,

        Home depot / lowes sells a "pvc cable saw" , its been around for about 15 years.

        When we got STUCK in the pool biz and needed to cut a pipe that was had to get to BUT didn't have a saw like that we would use the wire from the pool cover, I am sure most people have seen that ad know what I mean. you just strip the middle and coil a few inches around your hands and instant saw ,

        But yea, I have used that method a lot


        ACE is the place

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        • #5
          Re: Ask This Old House

          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
          Missed it today. And I have done the string saw but I suck at it. Or maybe haven't done it enough. If you don't keep just the right pace the pipe melts back together. Then you have to do it again or the string gets melted into the pipe!

          Don't know why someone would use a hacksaw if they had a tubing cutter and the room to use it. Maybe they had some seconds to fill to make up the show.

          J.C.
          I go with PS and use the cable saw, very useful. I've found the nylon twisted line works better than the braided.

          Maybe they wanted to make the homeowner put in some sweat equity?
          Buy cheap, buy twice.

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          • #6
            Re: Ask This Old House

            The cable saw is great for cutting pvc in a narrow trench or when you have stone under the pipe and there is not enough room for the blade to travel.

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            • #7
              Re: Ask This Old House

              it sucks for abs. the abs wants to weld itself back together.

              a hacksaw, sawzall is fine for cutting copper. but a word of caution

              if you're cutting the copper in place, especially on vertical pipe, where is all the copper saw dust ending up

              these burrs are perfect for future service of ballcocks, flushometers, dishwashers, delta and moen valves, washing machines and aerators.
              just about any fixture with rubber components

              save the saw for new fab work where you can dump out the shavings.

              rick.
              phoebe it is

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