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  • My experience with the great Ridgid

    I'll make this short and sweet. I purchased a Ridgid Sump Pump 2 years ago at Home Depot. A model 330D which now needs a new diaphragm switch to the tune of 83 bucks. What a RIPOFF. Ridgid and Home Depot ought to have this pump stuck right up where the sun don"t shine. I'm going to tell everyone I see for the rest of my life what a ripoff Ridgid is and Home Depot is no better for selling the trash.

  • #2
    Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

    Page 5 of the owners manual suggests as recommended maintainance that the switch assembly be replaced every 2 years. Guess its about time.
    Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

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    • #3
      Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

      I'm speechless

      Attachment



      I'm going to go let my wife beat me up. Attachment
      Attached Files
      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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      • #4
        Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

        I did read page 5 of the manual. Its the 83 dollars for the switch thats got my dander up. this pump is only 150.dollars new. By the way I bought a new pump. A Zoeller this time. No more Home depot trash.

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        • #5
          Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

          Originally posted by Ridgid owner View Post
          I did read page 5 of the manual. Its the 83 dollars for the switch thats got my dander up. this pump is only 150.dollars new. By the way I bought a new pump. A Zoeller this time. No more Home depot trash.


          Ridgid sump pumps are marketed for DIY Homeowners while Zoellers are marketed to Pros. Of course when a switch on the cheaper Zoellers goes out you usually throw the old one pump away and buy a new one. It sound like that's what you did with the Ridgid so I'm not sure there is a difference.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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          • #6
            Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

            Originally posted by Ridgid owner View Post
            I did read page 5 of the manual. Its the 83 dollars for the switch thats got my dander up. this pump is only 150.dollars new. By the way I bought a new pump. A Zoeller this time. No more Home depot trash.


            Did you buy the Zoeller M53, or the N53?


            I'll tell you straight up right now, the M53's switch is good for 90,000 cycles, and you're on borrowed time from there on out. The N53 with the external/separate switch assembly is good for 190,000 cycles. Told straight from the engineer on that statement.

            It's best to do two things with that Zoeller:


            Set that pump in the pit at an elevation inside that pulls from the largest table of water. If that pump has a tendency to cycle on and off a lot, that switch like any mechanical switch will use its life up quickly.

            Second,

            Did you drill a hole in the discharge pipe between the check valve and discharge port? It must be 6" above the discharge port to effectively protect from Air Lock.


            Air Lock occurs when there's a drawdown of the water in the pit, or "overcycling" and allows an air pocket to entrain into the impeller chamber.

            When the pit fills back up with water, this air pocket sits like a bubble and when the switch engages to run the pump, it doesn't have the power to "lift" the check valve to open and send its contents out of the pit.

            You MUST do this to protect the pump and the situation of a flood in your basement with a perfectly working pump.

            There's not a sump pump or sewage pump installed with my name on it without a hole drilled in the side of the discharge pipe. 3/16" hole angled down into the pit.


            I use the N53 with separate switch assembly and it's not the tethered float, it's the armature type that mounts anywhere on the discharge pipe at any height without having to raise the pump itself to accomplish the largest water table for time distance between cycles.
            Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBING; 12-13-2008, 01:12 AM.
            Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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            • #7
              Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

              Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
              Did you buy the Zoeller M53, or the N53?


              I'll tell you straight up right now, the M53's switch is good for 90,000 cycles, and you're on borrowed time from there on out. The N53 with the external/separate switch assembly is good for 190,000 cycles. Told straight from the engineer on that statement.

              It's best to do two things with that Zoeller:


              Set that pump in the pit at an elevation inside that pulls from the largest table of water. If that pump has a tendency to cycle on and off a lot, that switch like any mechanical switch will use its life up quickly.

              Second,

              Did you drill a hole in the discharge pipe between the check valve and discharge port? It must be 6" above the discharge port to effectively protect from Air Lock.


              Air Lock occurs when there's a drawdown of the water in the pit, or "overcycling" and allows an air pocket to entrain into the impeller chamber.

              When the pit fills back up with water, this air pocket sits like a bubble and when the switch engages to run the pump, it doesn't have the power to "lift" the check valve to open and send its contents out of the pit.

              You MUST do this to protect the pump and the situation of a flood in your basement with a perfectly working pump.

              There's not a sump pump or sewage pump installed with my name on it without a hole drilled in the side of the discharge pipe. 3/16" hole angled down into the pit.


              I use the N53 with separate switch assembly and it's not the tethered float, it's the armature type that mounts anywhere on the discharge pipe at any height without having to raise the pump itself to accomplish the largest water table for time distance between cycles.
              I recomend DUNBAR OUR NEW PUMP ZAR ! May have a short on Omamas cabinet!
              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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              • #8
                Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

                Interesting Dunbar! I just started useing Zoeller pumps and woundered about the fast on off of the pump.

                I almost never install them but pedistal pumps seem the best because of the long cycle time becase of the adustable float.

                Around here I will not install a presure switch. They are a terrible They just don't last. Good concept I hope someday they improve.

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                • #9
                  Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

                  Dunbar,Can You help out a thick Mick? Maybe a little sketch of where I drill this hole.
                  Thanks' Tool
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                  • #10
                    Re: My experience with the great Ridgid

                    tool. it needs to be a 3/16'' hole drilled below the level of the check valve. typically about the top of the pump, below the pit cover. i too drill at an angle to allow the spray to stay in the pit.

                    i've seen too many pumps installed without the hole and i've seen many that had an air lock, running dry. the vent hole allows the trapped air to purge.

                    without a check valve you don't need the hole. but you do need the check valve

                    zoller pumps have a piece of strapping tape holding the float in position during shipping. there is a label explaining the 3/16'' hole. along with the directions and box it comes in. still people ignore this very important step.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

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