Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Drain Field Problem

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Drain Field Problem

    I am having a problem with my drain field taking the amount of water we use. It takes the waste water slowly, but when we shower or do laundry the D-Box overflows. I can divert it for a couple of days and it will wok OK for a day and then back to overflowing. I have done some reasearch and beleive the problem might be a thick Bio-Mat. Comments? Ground water is not a problem now, but was when this all started. We had a week of warm rainy weather and the ground water was within 6" of the surface, now it is back to normal, none.

    I am planning on putting in a drywell for the graywater this spring, but need to do something until then. I have come across a couple of products that CLAIM to solve the problem for a $200 bucks, they are Drayner's Mega-Bio and Septic Seep. Are these good products or are they just hype. Do any of you know of products that work, if you feel this is the problem?

    System info:
    Installed 11-03, put in full use 6-05
    1200 gal tank w/lift pump to leach field
    Pumped 8-07 and will pump this summer (every 2 years)
    2 1/2 baths 4 people
    washer and dishwasher

    We are extremly carefull of what goes drown the drain

    Thanks for any help,
    Paul
    "Corripe Cervisiam"

  • #2
    Re: Drain Field Problem

    Describe the leach field. Is it perforated pipe in gravel? 10" gravelless pipe with a covering? Or? Any other info would be helpful.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Drain Field Problem

      I dont like chemicals in a septic system, they never seem to live up to the hype. It sounds like your problem is groundwater though so chemicals would be helpless. I would recomend instead of installing a drywell to go with a curtain drain to lower the water table in the septic area. You are much to far up north for me to recommend a contractor but I am sure that one of your neighbors has had similiar problems and can reccomend someone. Keep in mind this is just speculation based upon what you said in your original post i would have to go out to the site and do some extensive testing to come up with a definite and correct solution.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Drain Field Problem

        I am told by the installer, I wasn't present at install, that there is plenty of gravel, but they don't know exactly what they did 5 years ago. The person that oversaw the install has moved on and no info. I know that my soil is on the gravey/sandy side. From digging around I can see 2- 4" drain pipes coming out of the D-Box about 18" or so turning 90* there appers to be a non-woven fabric below that. I do know from digging in that area that there is at least 2 feet of gravel. Best I can tell you without digging it up.

        Paul
        "Corripe Cervisiam"

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Drain Field Problem

          Vince, I don't think ground water is the factor now. I dug down a couple of feet in front the D-Box and no water, also I am on a hill. Main floor is upper level and the celler is walk out. Leach field is at the upper level.
          Paul
          "Corripe Cervisiam"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Drain Field Problem

            Your best bet is to have the installer come out and fix it by NYS law he is required to provide a 7 year guarentee from the initial install

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Drain Field Problem

              Thanks, not aware of that.
              Paul
              "Corripe Cervisiam"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Drain Field Problem

                On second thaught have the designer come out too. It may not be the installer but the designer who didnt do their job right! unfortunately if it was the designer you have little recourse other than legal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Drain Field Problem

                  Both one in the same and it was checked by man (code Officer that is).

                  Paul
                  "Corripe Cervisiam"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Drain Field Problem

                    Is it also possible that the septic system is full of "crud" and simply needs to be pumped out?

                    Do you use the kitchen garbage disposal? If you do, stop immediately and that alone will reduce septic system stress by 75%!

                    What do you flush down your toilets? If you do anything more than toilet paper stop and your septic system will improve.

                    How about laundry? Today's wash machines do not allow you to separate the lint! It goes down the drain with the rinse water and that stuff can and will destroy a septic system!!!

                    Do a Google search for "Filtrol 160" This is an outboard lint filter for the wash machine. I have one over three years now and it's amazing how much lint you produce from a single load of laundry!

                    Is the septic system designed to support the household? how many people do you have in the house? How many bathrooms? These numbers effect the operation of a septic system!

                    If you have a large number of people instead of a "typical family" or have added toilets etc. you have exceeded the septic system design!

                    I think you get the idea, septic systems are fragile and require proper use to work!


                    Cactus Man

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Drain Field Problem

                      Put a meter on the water if you don't have one.

                      J.C.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Drain Field Problem

                        Is it also possible that the septic system is full of "crud" and simply needs to be pumped out? Pumped in 8/07, schelduled for this summer (evey 2 years)
                        Do you use the kitchen garbage disposal? NO
                        What do you flush down your toilets? Toilet paper only
                        How about laundry? COLOR="Black"]No filter, but planning to put in dry well or curtain drain this spring for it. I have looked at the Filtrol 160.[/COLOR]

                        Rest of your questions answered in original post.
                        Paul
                        "Corripe Cervisiam"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Drain Field Problem

                          I'm going to take it as given that you have correctly identified the problem as downstream of the tank.

                          You mention a d-box. The presence of this indicates you have two fields (or a large field divided into two sections); effluent is diverted to one or the other depending on the position of the valve in the d-box. The behavior you describe, works ok for a day or two when you switch the d-box, indicates both fields have gotten slow.

                          I would agree this is probably in the field(s) as it occurs in both; if it was a crushed pipe problem below the d-box it would only occur when d-box switched to that side. Suggest you verify no poblem in effluent piping to dbox from tank by hiring someone with a jetter and a camera (line will likely need to be jetted clean to see anything). Alternatively, d-box can possibly be disassembled to remove valve and thus expose flowpath. positive flow to box from tank can then be verified by running water until tank is backed up and verify d-box backed up as well. I suggest this work to verify that the field is in fact the problem and energy is not exerted in that direction to no purpose.

                          assuming all well to d-box, fields sometimes recover a bit from jetting effluent lines. This would also verify lines to field(s) not crushed. Fields also sometimes recover a bit from a rest. pumping tank would give field a short rest.

                          re chemical treatments; I have not seen great success with anything, but have not personally tried the products you mention. A not uncommon practice here is to pump out the laterals and apply a largeish quantity of fairly strong hydrogen peroxide. Septic pros in your area may be familiar with this process and will know more about how successful its been for them in your area.

                          Another possible treatment I have heard of but have no experience with is hydro-fracture. They core holes in the field and pump water in at very high pressure to break up the soils. Again consult a pro in your area to determine if this might be suitable.

                          Another thing being touted which again I have no experience with are areator systems for the tank. There are several brands available, at differing price levels and corresponding micky-mouseness, but essentially they all attempt to introduce oxygen to the tank and the effluent in order to change the bacterial process from an anerobic to an aerobic one. You'll find all kinds of praising the heavens testimonials on the mfr's sites. Again no personal experience.

                          Suggest you contact evvironmental health office in your area. They should have documents describing your system and soils on file from the permit for the installation.

                          five years is a very short time for a field to fail in. I only see that in crappy designs, crappy installations, and or high clay soils.

                          I'd suggest the following couse;
                          - make sure the problem is what you think it is
                          - gather all info you can about your installation and soils
                          - ask everyone you run into what they know about septic systems and septic pros in your area; you'll soon start hearing the same names over and over again as the right pros to use, and might find out that you are in an area known for these problems due to soils.
                          - take your info and your diagnosed problem to the most recommended pros, and get their reccomendations
                          - decide where to go from there

                          Another thought; you mention a walkout level below the level of the field. Do you have a bathroom on this level? If so, is the TANK also above this level? ie is there a pump station to throw waste up to the tank? or is there a pump after the tank to throw effluent to the field? you may just have a pump problem.

                          If all else fails, or if you have high clay/poor drainig solis, give up and plop a mound on top of your field.

                          Good luck and happy to help if any of this is unclear.
                          This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Drain Field Problem

                            Wow! Ace Sewer nice reply. I will follow up on your sugestions. Two things are for sure, they are no crushed pipes (foot traffic and small lawnmower only) and no clay. Septic tank is functioning, lift station working ok. D-Box backs up.

                            One of my major concerns is that there is way too much water going to the field and its slowing down is part of the problem. Like I said, if I divert the water from the lift station for a couple of days it work ok for a little while. I am going to move the gray water and water softners to a dry well or curtain drain this spring, when the frost is gone.

                            Thanks for all the info,
                            Paul
                            "Corripe Cervisiam"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Drain Field Problem

                              is you lift station between your house and the tank? ie is your tank also at a raised elevation and the pump(s) throw it up to the tank and it goes by gravity to the field?

                              or

                              is your tank at a low elevation and waste gets to the tank by gravity and the lift station is after the tank and the pump(s) throw effluent up to the field?

                              if the second situation, I have seen 'force distribution' systems come into vogue. These use small diameter (2" or even smaller) lines for the leach lines with small holes drilled far apart relative to the usual 4" perf pipe and a pump to force the effluent out through them. I've seen problems with these as the engineers spec the drain holes too small, on the order of 1/8", and they plug up easily.
                              This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X