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  • Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

    I'm going to replace my submersible sump pump, I've currently got a 1/3 hp float type. The old one has a short length of pipe coming out of the exit hole, then the check valve, then piping up and out through the cellar wall. Most directions for installation of pumps say to do it this way. Why can't I just screw the check valve directly into the pump, and then continue the piping? Does the valve have to be a certain distance from the pump?

    Thanks for any info!!

  • #2
    Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

    You need a short section of pie with a 3/16" hole drilled in it to prevent hydro-locking the pump. The instructions should have the minimum size hole and where to put the check valve.

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    • #3
      Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

      Originally posted by wrench spinner View Post
      You need a short section of pie with a 3/16" hole drilled in it to prevent hydro-locking the pump. The instructions should have the minimum size hole and where to put the check valve.
      We've found strawberry pie to be the best.

      (I feel so "WHATEVERISH")

      J.C.

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      • #4
        Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

        its WHATEVERish

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        • #5
          Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

          GaryLC, I believe the placement of the check valve is important. If you place it to close to a submersible sump pump and lets say you have a discharge line that runs to a basement ceiling, when the pump is not on you have the weight of the water in the discharge line holding the check valve closed. (static head) As your sump pump starts to get old it will have a tough time pushing against all of that weight. By picking a location two to three feet off of the top of the sump pit you will give your pump an advantage as the pumped slug of water will hit the check valve and allow it to open easier due to the reduced weight of water above it. I always told my plumbers to put the check valve at belly button height.

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          • #6
            Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

            Originally posted by rookie plumber View Post
            GaryLC, I believe the placement of the check valve is important. If you place it to close to a submersible sump pump and lets say you have a discharge line that runs to a basement ceiling, when the pump is not on you have the weight of the water in the discharge line holding the check valve closed. (static head) As your sump pump starts to get old it will have a tough time pushing against all of that weight. By picking a location two to three feet off of the top of the sump pit you will give your pump an advantage as the pumped slug of water will hit the check valve and allow it to open easier due to the reduced weight of water above it. I always told my plumbers to put the check valve at belly button height.

            I guess you are giving the pump a chance to get up to speed before there is too much pressure. Otherwise the pump should be able to handle the pressure.
            Seems like the higher the check valve the more water comes back when the pump stops and the higher chance the pump will continue to run on and off.
            Just seems to me the lower the check valve the better.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Sump Pump Check Valve Installation

              When you consider how much water it takes to activate a float, the small amount of water that flows back into the sump is not enough to make a difference. It's the homeowner that puts in their own sump pump without a check valve.......I've seen steaming sump pits that are as hot as soup from the water cycling up and down for days.

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