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replacing old iron pipe

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  • replacing old iron pipe

    I'm having problems with the drain in my bathroom sink. I've had to snake it out several times in the last few months. I've managed to clear it each time but there is no reason why it should keep stopping up as far as what is going down the drain is concerned.
    I checked out the plumbing in the basement and there is pvc pipe leading from the sink to a metal pipe (lead? cast iron?) that travels at a very odd slant down to a cast iron waste pipe. (house was built in 1933)
    I suspect that the odd metal pipe is the problem.
    How difficult is it to remove this piece of pipe and replace it with a pvc pipe? What kind of tool do I use to remove it?
    I've used pvc before but never attaching it to cast iron. How would I reconnect this.


    I really can't afford to hire a plumber (as much as I would like to) so please help me out with this. thanks

  • #2
    Re: replacing old iron pipe

    you need to hire justaguy

    actually a sawzall/ reciprocating saw/ hacksaw is what is used to cut out the old metal pipe.

    the new pvc is connected to the old stub piece with a no hub band/ mission band/ fernco band.

    provide proper support to keep the pipe in proper alignment. 1/4'' per foot is the correct slope.

    post photos for a better understanding.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: replacing old iron pipe

      Is the sink vented?

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      • #4
        Re: replacing old iron pipe

        is the odd metal pipe screwed into the cast iron or is there big gap filled with lead?
        I would remove the odd metal pipe at the joint with the cast iron. Either threading into the female threads or using "tyseal" depending on what you have.

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        • #5
          Re: replacing old iron pipe

          Need photos, w/o we are just guessing as the description provided (no offense intended) is not enough to go on. It's tough for someone who is not familiar with the materials used to put in to words what the configuration is.













          I though I would never get to use this emoticon :-)
          "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
          John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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