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  • new jersey plumbing code question?

    i own a condo, so i don't have access to an exterior or basement located, main water shutoff for my unit. what i do have is a twist, compression type shut off valve on the cold water pipe near my hot water heater. it is located before the t-fitting that splits the incoming cold water between the heater and the rest of the house. it slows the flow but there is still a steady trickle no matter how long i run the faucet(s). im going to install a ball valve but i'm a novice and i'm afraid that if i sweat the joint of the new ball valve that i might melt the nylon seals that seal the ball. i've found 2 other ball valves the utilize a push-in method. the first i found was SHARKBITE which is removable. the sales associates at home depot, where i purchased it, assured me that this is up to code to use in new jersey. i was sceptical and also went to a plumbing supply in my area.they told me that SHARKBITE is not up to code because it is removable but that they sell a similar product. it's made by LEGEND and is called INSTA-LOC. once it's pushed onto the pipe it cannot be removed. the sales associate at the plumbing supply said that because the INSTA-LOC is not removable, that this makes it ok for use in new jersey. if i decide to sell my unit in the future, i don't want to have to remove anything that doesn't pass inspection. so my question is which, if any, is ok according to new jersey code, or should i chance sweating a tradition ball valve?

  • #2
    Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

    You can read the NJ adopted plumbing code here:

    http://phcc.files.cms-plus.com/Depts...stratedWeb.pdf

    As far as I know Sharkbites are allowed (though personally I would prefer not use them). See section 4.2.7 "Push-on Joints"

    4.2.7 Push-on Joints

    a. Copper fittings for water supply and distribution, designed for manual push-on connections to ASTM B88 hard drawn copper tubing, shall include corrosion-resistant gripping fingers and an O-ring gasket complyingwith NSF 61 for potable water.
    EXCEPTION: Push-on fittings shall be permitted to be used with annealed copper water tube and OD sized CPVC and PEX tubing if such use is included in the fitting manufacturer’s technical data and installation instructions.
    b. The fittings shall comply with the material and sizing requirements of ASME B16.22 (wrought copper or copper alloy fittings) or ASME B16.18 (cast copper alloy fittings).
    c. During installation, the tube end shall be deburred and depth-marked to permit visual verification of full insertion of the tube into the fitting socket.
    d. The fittings shall be rated by their manufacturer for not less than 200 psig at 180 deg F.
    e. The fittings shall be permitted to be installed in concealed locations.

    And this from Cash Acme's site
    • Instant push-fit connection for increased ease-of-use.
    • No soldering, clamps, unions, or glue required.
    • Fittings certified to 200 PSI and 200°F (93°C).
    • Fits copper tubing, and CTS CPVC and PEX and connects all three types in any combination.
    • Integral tube liner for PEX installations, so
    • no loose components, ensures secure, reliable connection.
    • Design certified and agency listed.
    • Compact, robust DZR brass body. Foundation of a strong, corrosion resistant, durable fitting.
    • Design certified to ANSI/NSF-61 and ASSE 1061 product standard for use in potable water and hydronic heating water distribution.
    • Approved to be used underground and behind walls without access panels.
    • Designed for hydronic heating as well as potable water distribution.
    Last edited by Bob D.; 04-29-2009, 10:04 AM.
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
    ---------
    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

      thanks for the info, and the quick response. i'll email the company also. why would you prefer not to use them?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

        Originally posted by john050378 View Post
        thanks for the info, and the quick response. i'll email the company also. why would you prefer not to use them?
        Because I know how to solder and they are relatively new and have no track record.
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
        ---------------
        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
        ---------
        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

          Originally posted by john050378 View Post
          i own a condo, so i don't have access to an exterior or basement located, main water shutoff for my unit. what i do have is a twist, compression type shut off valve on the cold water pipe near my hot water heater. it is located before the t-fitting that splits the incoming cold water between the heater and the rest of the house. it slows the flow but there is still a steady trickle no matter how long i run the faucet(s). im going to install a ball valve but i'm a novice and i'm afraid that if i sweat the joint of the new ball valve that i might melt the nylon seals that seal the ball. i've found 2 other ball valves the utilize a push-in method. the first i found was SHARKBITE which is removable. the sales associates at home depot, where i purchased it, assured me that this is up to code to use in new jersey. i was sceptical and also went to a plumbing supply in my area.they told me that SHARKBITE is not up to code because it is removable but that they sell a similar product. it's made by LEGEND and is called INSTA-LOC. once it's pushed onto the pipe it cannot be removed. the sales associate at the plumbing supply said that because the INSTA-LOC is not removable, that this makes it ok for use in new jersey. if i decide to sell my unit in the future, i don't want to have to remove anything that doesn't pass inspection. so my question is which, if any, is ok according to new jersey code, or should i chance sweating a tradition ball valve?

          Nylon seal on a ball valve is forgiving......Your not gonna Melt the brass around the nylon so dont worry about it and solder away!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

            Nylon melts (depending on its composition) between 375°-675°F, a temperature easily reached when soldering, especially 95/5.

            I thought Teflon seats were more common, but I may be wrong. If you are not experienced at soldering to begin with, soldering a ball valve w/o damaging the seats will be a challenge.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
            ---------
            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

              i was guessing it's nylon. now that you mention teflon, that what it looks like.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

                Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                Nylon melts (depending on its composition) between 375°-675°F, a temperature easily reached when soldering, especially 95/5.

                I thought Teflon seats were more common, but I may be wrong. If you are not experienced at soldering to begin with, soldering a ball valve w/o damaging the seats will be a challenge.

                How many exactly have you had leak by? I have never seen this?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

                  Sounds like you need to call a plumber to have the valve replaced. Soldering is the only way to correctly fix, compression fittings are a time tested way to join two pipes but it needs to be done correctly. But compression fittings also allow you to make the connection with a leaking valve.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: new jersey plumbing code question?

                    Originally posted by BrandonG View Post
                    How many exactly have you had leak by? I have never seen this?
                    I have not had a ball valve leak because of damage to the seats, but I know how to solder and where to put the heat. Someone who is not adept at soldering is likely to put the heat where it will do the most damage and will also have a tendency to apply too much heat for too long, so they are more likely to have a problem.
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                    ---------
                    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                    Comment

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