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  • #16
    Re: Seepage Despite Working Sump Pump

    Yes, a bigger pit is necessary. The pump should rest for at least 30 seconds between cycles or it will burn out prematurely. Also you would be using more power because most power is consumed at start up.

    I would use silicon also. Squeeze it into the crack and smooth out.

    Something for you to think about: what do your downspouts connect to? Where does that drain to? I have seen buildings where the downspouts were wrongly connected to the drain tile.

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    • #17
      Re: Seepage Despite Working Sump Pump

      Originally posted by nickbee View Post
      Yes, a bigger pit is necessary. The pump should rest for at least 30 seconds between cycles or it will burn out prematurely. Also you would be using more power because most power is consumed at start up.

      I would use silicon also. Squeeze it into the crack and smooth out.

      Something for you to think about: what do your downspouts connect to? Where does that drain to? I have seen buildings where the downspouts were wrongly connected to the drain tile.
      My downspouts don't connect to anything. On the back of the house, I have 10' extensions that spill out at the end of my deck on either side. On the side I have 6-10 foot extensions - as much as is practical given proximity to the neighbors. On the front of the house, next to the front steps, I have a downspout with one of those rainguards on it that unrolls when it rains and spills the water out slowly. This particular downspout used to go into the ground and I believe out to the sewer, but we ripped out the walkway and put in a new paver path, and the downspout was disconnected from this underground discharge. At some point I'd like to have a plumber put a camera down there and see where it leads - perhaps I can reconnect the downspout, but in the meantime the hole is essentially covered by the downspout itself.

      I definitely want the primary pump to cycle less often during heavy rains, but this pump is pretty darn good - I've had it for 3 years and it's still going strong despite how active it is. I don't have stock in Zoeller, but I can attest that their pumps work. If the motor burns out, I'll know because I can tell when the water powered backup goes on - I can hear the water running through the pipes when it flows through to create the suction that empties the pit.

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      • #18
        Re: Seepage Despite Working Sump Pump

        Sounds good. You might want to see if you can somehow get those discharge points for the downspouts futher away from the building. Depends on the constaints of the property of course.

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        • #19
          Re: Seepage Despite Working Sump Pump

          Originally posted by nickbee View Post
          Sounds good. You might want to see if you can somehow get those discharge points for the downspouts futher away from the building. Depends on the constaints of the property of course.
          Yeah - I always chuckle when I see advice to slope your property away from the house, run your downspouts far away, etc. Makes it seem like everyone has acres of land. I live in a very old suburb of Chicago. Typical lot size is 40x125. We don't live on rolling hills with big retention ponds close by. My house is 50 or so feet deep, and with a detached garage, there's about 25 feet from my house to the garage, and when the garage ends, there's another 20 feet to my property line. So the farthest my house sits from the property line (which is an alley) is about 40 feet. My deck spans the hole width of the house, and the downspouts go to the end of the deck on either side (10-11 feet away) - that's about as far as they can go without becoming a tripping hazard.

          I've thought about running drainage pipe under ground along the side of the house, and running the downspouts into the ground to get to the pipes and then to a dry well somewhere further away - maybe at some point I'll get to that, I'm just not sure how much incremental benefit I'll get by doing that. And after three years in the house I finally have the lawn I want so I'd hate to dig it up! We'll see what happens in the next couple of years - at some point I may add pavers along one side and I'll use that opportunity to slope them away from the house and add that exterior drain. What I'm really disappointed about is that when I put the new walkway in the front of the house, it was a perfect opportunity to run the downspout (the one that used to go under ground) under the pavers and into the adjacent landscaping and have it spill out into the front yard - which does have a pretty good slope to it as the front of the house is a few steps above street level. Another case of I wish I knew then what I know now.

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