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  • Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

    Last year I posted a thread about a leaking shutoff. There was a lot of discussions about sleeve pullers.

    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...light=blue_can

    In one of my bathrooms(not the one in the previous thread) at one time water had been spraying out of the shower on to the drywall and ended up causing it to peel and some surface mold. I’ve finally got around to repairing the drywall.

    One side was easy enough but on the other side the toilet fitting was right in the way. I suppose I could have used 2 pieces of drywall to meet at the fitting but I wanted a clean solution so I decided to remove everything including the chrome plate at the back so I could install a piece of drywall with a circle cut to the diameter of the pipe (1/2”).

    So since I had to pull the nut and ring I decided to buy one of the tools suggested in that previous thread (supposed to be a good one). In any event the tool pulled off the ring but it was really tight. Once the ring came off as the picture shows the copper pipe was severely shrunk. I’m assuming the original plumber must have tightened the crap out of the nut thereby deforming and crushing the pipe and then by pulling the ring the pipe got compressed and stretched.



    So I ended up having to desolder the pipe further back and solder new copper pipe with a new coupling. This was possible because the drywall was open. If not – I have no idea how you solve this issue.

    This is the state of the puller now. The ring is stuck on – I have to either press it out in my hydraulic press with a bearing split plate or cut it off with some cutoff tool like a dremel.



    For now I have installed the new shutoff on a longer pipe as the framing got wet in the process it is has to dry out and I need to keep the bathroom in service. I will take it off shortly to install the drywall.

    Now this is the first time I’ve done this. Am I just unlucky having a plumber over tighten these things or did I miss something.

    I normally tighten the compression nut just enough to stop leaks and keep checking it for several hours until I’m satisfied there is no leak.

    When I reinstall the shutoff do I need to buy a new shutoff (i.e. is there something special about their compression sleeves) or can I just get on of those Watts 5/8” OD sleeves that come in a pack.

    Am I better off using a sweat on fitting rather than a compression fitting to prevent future problems? I don’t recall seeing any sweat on shutoffs at Home Depot where I got a lot of this stuff.

  • #2
    Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

    funny this came up today as i was at the hardware store and helped a guy with the same issue. problem was he didn't know about a compression puller or the fact that the ferrule was removable.

    i showed him my puller and explained how it works.

    your copper stub out is most likely type m and the compression ferrule will bite into the thinner copper.

    i've never had a ferrule i couldn't remove and i never destroyed a copper stub in the process. so i can't say why you had an issue with yours.

    as far as removing the brass ferrule. pretty easy to use a small hammer to tap it off or expand it by tapping on it.

    of course before we had compression pullers, we just cut the ferrule off by slicing into it diagonally. if need be knock off the estucion and tap the nut back to make room.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

      I didnt know until this moment that they had pullers for a ferrule. It's a good idea for a tool. Why can't I think of something like that?

      I've always used my channel locks to grab the ferrule hard enough to grip but not so much as to bend the copper then twist it clockwise a 1/4 turn, then counterclockwise a 1/4 turn, repeat while pulling with steady pressure away from the wall and it will work itself towards the end of the copper until it comes off.

      The one time I can remember this being a problem was because the previous "plumber" had stubbed out with soft copper.

      I'd go back with a new compression stop on type L copper.

      Lenny

      Pronounced A-Bear Drain Care

      I know, it doesn't make sense.


      http://www.hebertdraincare.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

        RICK, Is this like the one you use?

        http://www.superiortool.com/tools/sp...tool/03943.htm

        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

          no it's not. the problem with that style is it relies on the thread of the nut being a fine thread. most older stops are the coarse thread.

          the 1 i use is the red pasco one that's pictured from the first post.

          for just a few bucks you could buy the front round 1/2'' x 5/8'' steel nose piece. this is then used with a handle puller to remove the ferrule.

          i don't like that style as most handle pullers are not very strong and the threaded nut will pull out.

          spend the $20. for a real tool that is designed for everyday use.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

            I did not point out that some of the damage on that pipe in the first pic is due to me holding it with a pair of pliers while heating the coupling. It had to be rotated off since the pipe hanger was in the way. The dimple next to the arrow shows the original deformation. I replaced the pipe as I had doubts about it not leaking with that dimple in place but maybe it could have been reused - but on the other hand it was clear the front part had also deformed after pulling the nut and ferrule.

            Good point about it being type M - when I have a moment I will cut the old pipe in a suitable place and measure the wall thickness with a set of calipers.

            As for the handle pullers - I did try to pull and ferrule on another fitting some years ago and it broke right away. I would not recommend those also. I managed on that occasion without having to pull it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

              The puller tool I have is designed to also remove the ferrule off of it self if you unscrew the handle all the way to the top, it pushes the old ferrule off of the shaft.
              ANYONE CAN TAKE THE HELM WHEN THE SEA IS CALM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

                Rick

                Thanks for the info and I bet this is the one you use. Pasco 4661
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

                  Use a sweat stop.

                  J.C.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Compression Fittings and Sleeve Pullers

                    I rechecked at Home Depot where I buy most of my plumbing supplies and they did not have a stop with the sweat connection - only threaded (for iron pipe), compression or quick fit (I don't recall seeing the quick fit before - anyone here tried it?). I'm sure sweat stops are available but in order to not be stuck without running water I opted for a new stop with the compression fitting which I could buy at short notice. I suppose I could have capped it for a while. However, this time I have left a reasonable amount of copper sticking out of the dryall to account for any problems in the future (although I cannot see any reason why I would want to pull it in the near future).

                    Anyway job is complete and much to my suprise the ferrule stuck on the puller came off easily but it looks like I will need to press the silver piece back on to the shaft (looks like a press fit).

                    Comment

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