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  • Cast Iron sink removal

    A customer wanted to switch from a cast iron sink to stainless steel. The counter top is porcelain tile (very fragile). I am wondering if any one has any techniques or tools to remove the sink without damaging the tiles.
    Specifically getting the sink loose from the caulking.

  • #2
    Re: Cast Iron sink removal

    Originally posted by EasyEman View Post
    A customer wanted to switch from a cast iron sink to stainless steel. The counter top is porcelain tile (very fragile). I am wondering if any one has any techniques or tools to remove the sink without damaging the tiles.
    Specifically getting the sink loose from the caulking.
    I've tried caulk softening chemicals and found they weren't worth a darn.

    I have rigged up a small floor jack with boards, put a little pressure on the bottom, and cut away at the caulk. Then a little more pressure, cut, repeat slowly.

    I've also worked on a shower once with the door frame bonded with silicone like I've never seen before. Cut the caulk, heated with a torch etc. Still pulled the tile in chunks. Warned them before hand and they weren't mad.

    You couldn't beat the tile off the frame with a hammer after it was removed.

    Latex typically used at the sinks I've seen should be easier.

    J.C.

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    • #3
      Re: Cast Iron sink removal

      I tried to get a release form signed but they refused. So I didn't go on.

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      • #4
        Re: Cast Iron sink removal

        Let them eat the thing then.

        J.C.

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        • #5
          Re: Cast Iron sink removal

          Has anyone tried pulling fishing line or piano wire through through the caulking?

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          • #6
            Re: Cast Iron sink removal

            do you lnow what the material is? something like Dow 5200 Marine sealant is virtually impossible to work with once it's cured. Valiant Yachts (and other) use it for hull to deck joining. i used it for deck winch pads and it was a pain to remove the pads for replacement 5 years later.

            steve
            In the never ending struggle to keep the water flowing.... The Poo Poo Cowboy rides again!!!

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            • #7
              Re: Cast Iron sink removal

              Originally posted by EasyEman View Post
              A customer wanted to switch from a cast iron sink to stainless steel. The counter top is porcelain tile (very fragile). I am wondering if any one has any techniques or tools to remove the sink without damaging the tiles.
              Specifically getting the sink loose from the caulking.

              is this a self rimming sink?

              same as i do with toilets. use a painters putty knife that has the brass end to hammer on.

              the painter one has a sharp end for scraping and can take a good beating. plus it's tapered like a chisel.

              typically most sinks that are self rimming are not dropped into wet caulking. they tend to be caulked after the fact and are a little easier to lift once you break an edge. also a heat gun will soften the caulking too.

              so is it a self rimming sink?

              rick.
              phoebe it is

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              • #8
                Re: Cast Iron sink removal

                I pity the plumber that hsa to remove any sink i've installed, I put down a bead of caulk right at the edge of the hole, drop the sink in, then add a nice smooth bead to the outside.
                the idea of a swelling countertop makes me nervous.
                No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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                • #9
                  Re: Cast Iron sink removal

                  [QUOTE=PLUMBER RICK;235851]is this a self rimming sink?

                  YES


                  typically most sinks that are self rimming are not dropped into wet caulking. they tend to be caulked after the fact and are a little easier to lift once you break an edge. also a heat gun will soften the caulking too.

                  When I looked underneath the sink the caulking was squeezed through, it look as though they set it in caulking rather than running a bead around. Looks like biscuit color underneath end latex grout matching stuff outside.
                  It seems like pushing up on the sink risks lifting tiles off also. Heat gun sounds possible.

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