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  • Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

    First off, I currently have no sump pump, only a cleanout installed and use a stand pipe if needed.

    We have had 2 minor floods in our basement (due to our lines clogged with tree roots) we corrected the problem by installing a cleanout and replacing the pipe where the tree roots were forming.

    In the last 9 months, we have twice had backups due to excessive rain where the city sewers could not handle the rain.

    With these 2 backups, besides the water coming up the floor drain, water appeared to enter from all sides of the basement (filled up quickly to about 2-4 inches). Other than these incidents, seepage has been little to none where I can usually find a cause like clogged gutter overflowing and water seeping through windows rather than foundation.

    We are planning on having overhead sewers put in with an ejector pit/pump insalled.

    That being said, what's the recommendation on having floor drain tiles installed? - Quite costly and we have DIY shelving (2x12 boards on milk crates) on most perimeter walls. Would be a monumental task to move all this stuff.

    We plan to once again carpet with carpet tiles. What's the risk of getting a basement full of water or substantial seepage?

    Thoughts or comments??

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

    Your problem will be back unless You find a fix. I would install 16" porcelain tile. Ask about a back flow valve. Sorry I'm not versed on Ill. plumbing situation. Someone from Your area will be on later I ,hope. good luck
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

      OK - I'm having a gate valve put in between the city sewers and the house. The house sewer and rainwater come to a Tee before the gatevalve (house side) and there is an injector pump that can pump sewage/water from the house side to the city side if the gate's closed.

      With this in place, any reason to add additional safegards such as sump pump and drain tiles - other than redundancy and backup??

      Opinions?

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      • #4
        Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

        Originally posted by jcm1229 View Post
        OK - I'm having a gate valve put in between the city sewers and the house. The house sewer and rainwater come to a Tee before the gatevalve (house side) and there is an injector pump that can pump sewage/water from the house side to the city side if the gate's closed.

        With this in place, any reason to add additional safegards such as sump pump and drain tiles - other than redundancy and backup??

        Opinions?
        I'm far from an expert here, but it appears your redundancy is the gate valve. You mention that you are putting in an overhead sewer - that will solve your problem of the water coming up through the floor drain, as it will no longer be connected to the sewer.

        However, seepage has nothing to do with the sewer - that is water gathering around the foundation and making it's way into the house via hydrostatic pressure. The only way to relieve that is though installation of a perimeter drain tile and sump pump. If it has happened in the past, it will definitely happen again. You mention water seeping through the windows - are you sure? You shouldn't have anything other than an egress window below grade, and your window well should be covered to prevent water from accumulating in your window well.

        You could try an exterior french drain that runs away from the house into a dry well - but if you've gotten two inches of water in your basement from seepage, that's not going to keep all of the water out.

        I am near Chicago and I had a similar seepage problem. I had an interior drain tile and sump pit installed, along with an overhead sewer, and while the drain tile was costly and slightly inconvenient to install, it works.

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        • #5
          Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

          JCM,

          I think you have the right idea about multiple approaches to this problem.

          Your gate valve should be automatic, like a one-way flapper valve that lets sewer water out but not back in. Some gate valves are "manual" where you have to be there when the problem is occurring to close it.

          Secondly, I'd get all your rain gutters extended away from the foundation above ground level. If they are connected to your exterior drain tiles or sewer, disconnect them and run them above ground level. Don't run them into drywells because they will fill up and overflow during heavy or extended rainfalls.

          Your question about adding drain tiles is a good one. I'd be careful about digging the outside up to install them. I've seen a lot of times where the loose dirt caused by excavation has caused all sorts of additional problems. You're getting water now but you don't want to start getting mud coming in.

          Ther are companies that can install them inside underneath your basement floor. A sump pump is your best bet for getting rid of the water or to drain your inside drain tiles because you are not relying on the sewer system to get rid of the water.

          I found a site http://www.b-dry.com/hydrostatic-pressure-relief.html that covers differnt options for your type problem. I think like always, prevention is the best approach but I do like your idea about adding some drainage and a sump pump.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

            I do not know if you had this problem addressed yet. What you have described with a gate valve and an ejector pump is a type of a flood control system. We have installed many of these in the Chicago area and the western suburbs. Many of the cities sewer systems are combination storm and sewerage, so when it gets a good rain and it can not handle the flow, it will surcharge and back up into many homes.

            A good flood control has a flapper type valve with a 2" tap on the top just past where it closes on the city sewer side. Then we install an overflow tee before the flapper on the house side, so while the flapper is being held closed by the sewer surcharge, your sewerage will overflow into an ejector pit within the flood control vault. Then the ejector pump will pump your sewerage into that 2" tap on the backwater valve, to keep you in service as long as you have power.

            One important note is these need to be maintained every year. Someone has to enter the vault and take apart the backwater valve and clean the flapper, and the valve seat, then lubricate all the moving parts (flapper hinge).

            The other option is to convert your in ground sewer to an overhead sewer, which is usually twice as much or more as flood control system.

            Here is a couple pictures that will give you an idea of what a flood control system is.



            Attached Files
            Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
            A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
            Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
            Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

              Maybe I missed something here, and I'm no expert on sewage systems. But are you telling me that your adding rainwater to your sewage system? Like maybe the gutters on the roof and possibly in other areas where rain water tends to collect? If so, I would think the rain water system should be totally separate from your sewage system.
              Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

                Originally posted by speedbump View Post
                Maybe I missed something here, and I'm no expert on sewage systems. But are you telling me that your adding rainwater to your sewage system? Like maybe the gutters on the roof and possibly in other areas where rain water tends to collect? If so, I would think the rain water system should be totally separate from your sewage system.
                Well then you give Chicago the billions to separate all their storm water from the sanitary system.

                Do not forget Chicago is an old city and lots of the sewers are combination systems. The storm drains in the streets are also the sanitary sewer. In some of the newer developed areas they separated the storm from the sanitary. But that is a very small percentage.
                Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
                A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
                Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
                Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

                  Originally posted by speedbump View Post
                  Maybe I missed something here, and I'm no expert on sewage systems. But are you telling me that your adding rainwater to your sewage system? Like maybe the gutters on the roof and possibly in other areas where rain water tends to collect? If so, I would think the rain water system should be totally separate from your sewage system.
                  Sewerage and Stormwater where I live are totally separate sewerage goes to the treatment plants and then to the sea and stormwater from the roofs and paths to the rivers and the sea and the reason for this is that there would be no sewerage treatment plant large enough to handle both at the same time.

                  Tony

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Flooded Basement - do I need drain tiles??

                    Originally posted by SewerRatz View Post
                    Well then you give Chicago the billions to separate all their storm water from the sanitary system.

                    Do not forget Chicago is an old city and lots of the sewers are combination systems. The storm drains in the streets are also the sanitary sewer. In some of the newer developed areas they separated the storm from the sanitary. But that is a very small percentage.
                    Yucky Poo thank God I don`t live in Chicago.

                    Tony

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