Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Plumbing Code - Reaming

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

    Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
    I must be losing my mind. I know that i posted a thread before asking for a step drill bit with 1/2, 3/4 and 1" sizes just for reaming. Can't find it now. Has Ron been here? hahahaha
    You're not losing it, I remember reading it Ben.


    People who are too aggressive or in a hurry will advance the cutter more than they should when cutting copper. Since you are not really 'cutting' but moving molecules, a parting of the ways so to speak, those molecules must go somewhere. The faster you push them aside the bigger wake you make, a ridge on the OD of the tube will build up. This can also cause tracking, even with a new cutter and wheel.
    Last edited by Bob D.; 08-30-2009, 07:25 AM.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

      Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
      I've asked this question a hundred times.
      Why is it that outside reaming is a step when using tubing cutters.A person is running more of a risk leaving an egdge off those blades than just leaving the smooth beveled surface provided by the cutters.

      on propress and sharkbite its important to round the leading edge. a tubing cutter with the factory rollers do a great job of displacing the ridge on the outside. so very little is required, but still required.
      same as required when socket fusion of hdpe pipe.

      If one was cutting with a toothed blade device I would of course agree,You need to knock down the sharp edges to protect the o-ring.

      me too. i try to avoid the sawzalls as the cuttings are very abrasive to the valves when they fall in.

      my copper chain cutter is a great tight quarters large scale cutter up to 4''. if you don't ream the od, you can't get the fitting on.

      Were they outside reaming last year at the Roundup Competition?

      yes we were on the propress competition.

      I absolutetly agree on the burrs inside of pipe.It's hard reaming a drop in place.
      my plier style hand reamers are great for 1/2''- 2''. it displaces the copper back onto itself and there is no burr.only works for id, not od. and is much easier to use when the pipe is not fixed in place.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

        As usual, you guys are waaaay ahead of me. It's common to hear talk about the need to ream pipe, but I guess I didn't know where that came from. I've never been able to put my finger on a specific standard to read about what constitutes a "properly reamed pipe." I did find NFPA 13, which references the standard for fire protection applications, but I appreciate the other codes you referenced. Guess I have some reading to do... (:utting on his reading glasses::
        Last edited by RIDGID Dave; 08-31-2009, 03:17 PM. Reason: emoticon

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

          dave, you better share what's hididng behind door #3 when we see you next week.

          you started the thread for a reason

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

            I was looking through the discontinued tools web pages and noticed that both the #127 and the #227 reamers are listed as discontinued. It that is correct then what has replaced them?

            While not very glamourless this is an essential and useful tool that no one running copper or working with tubing should be without.

            Is RIDGID going to leave it to some one else to fill this tool niche? Or is a new and improved version on the way out?
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

              http://www.advantage-drillbits.com/metals/reamers.html

              ......here's some.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

                Originally posted by halfpint View Post

                Yes those are reamers but a totally different type and use.

                Here is the #127


                and the #227



                Here is a link to the web site fo the manufacturer of the Imperial Eastman tool line
                http://www.stridetool.com/tools/tools.html

                But I do not see their reamer listed among the tools on the site. I did not look through
                the downloadable PDF catalog through.
                Last edited by Bob D.; 09-07-2009, 01:01 PM.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

                  Hi
                  as a resident of the UK, I may have misunderstood a) the question, b) what reaming is, or c) sometimes some ask a question, already knowing the answer - it is the effect of asking it that is all that they want...

                  However, here is my answer for what it is worth.

                  In the UK, central heating can literally be made up of the connection of thousands of pieces of (copper usually) pipe, thru elbows, tees, str8 connectors etc, whether they be end-feed, yorkshire or compression. As can our hot and cold water systems to the house. As can the gas supply etc..

                  If the plumber hasn't (diligently) reamed all (inside) edges of the pipes, a hissing sound reverberates all around the house (the greater the number of connections, the greater the hissing). The greater the burred edges of the pipe (and the bluntness of the pipe cutter) the greater exacerbation of the problem; as for the hot and cold water supply the same obtains - and the greater the water pressure, the greater the hissing noise. When I installed the central heating system in my house and ripped out all the lead piping (it's an old house) and replaced it with copper, I diligently reamed every end of every piece of copper pipe (15mm and 22mm - and for the gas supply 28mm). If I had asked a professional plumber to install the central heating etc., they wouldn't bother to ream the pipes. And I am conscious of this omission whenever I visit friends; especially in the quiet countryside. The hissing of the central heating water as it travels thru the pipes is ever present. In my house it is very nearly silent.

                  So why is the question being asked? Every pipe end in every system needs to be reamed to remove the burr.

                  So why is this question being asked? or am I missing something?

                  Regards William

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Plumbing Code - Reaming

                    William,

                    First off welcome to the forum. The question was asked by a Project manager at Ridgid. I'm not sure if they need the info for a new project or for marketing. Another possible issue in non-reamed copper is localized velocity erosion and pin hole leaks.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X