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Cast Iron T Connection Problem

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  • Cast Iron T Connection Problem

    I have a Cast Iron Vent Stack that the Kitchen sink connects into. The problem is the metal horizontal drain pipe that connected into the sink assembly was cracked next to the vent stack connection. I can not remove the threaded nut that attached the original horizontal pipe to the vent stack. It is tucked into a concrete block wall and the pipe wrench can't get a grip. Any suggestions?

    I have tried penetrating compound....Attaching a pvc pipe with epoxy.... I can't torch it because of wires/water pipes next to it.... I'm out of options. I've attached some pics.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

    Piece of cake.
    Use a "mini hacker" (a hack saw blade in a handle or in a desperate situation wrap some tape around a hacksaw blade) If you have room for a sawzall this will also work. Make two vertical cuts into the damaged pipe that looks like it is twisted in the bushing. Do not cut too deep or you will damage the threads. I normally make my cuts pretty close together 4:00 6:00. Then I use a hammer and a punch to knock out my cut. You will then see that the threads inside the bushing are in great shape. Use your punch with the hammer and hit it at 7:00 and you will see the rest of the pipe seperating from the bushing and you can use a pliers or needle nose to remove whats left. An additional tip is to shove a rag down the pipe before getting started to keep from loosing things and also to cut the ragged gal pipe that is petruding from the bushing so that it is flat wth the top of the bushing.

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    • #3
      Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

      just did that yesterday on a 2.5'' brass c/o plug. used a hole saw to drill out the plug to allow snaking, then used the mini hakzall to cut out a small 3/4'' section at 6oclock. used a smalll punch to knockout the cut. then the rest of the plug pretty much fell out.

      perfect threads left for the new abs plug into the cast ibco for the next time

      i can swear i spoke to my buddy steve about this yesterday

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

        Originally posted by rookie plumber View Post
        Piece of cake.
        Use a "mini hacker" (a hack saw blade in a handle or in a desperate situation wrap some tape around a hacksaw blade) If you have room for a sawzall this will also work. Make two vertical cuts into the damaged pipe that looks like it is twisted in the bushing. Do not cut too deep or you will damage the threads. I normally make my cuts pretty close together 4:00 6:00. Then I use a hammer and a punch to knock out my cut. You will then see that the threads inside the bushing are in great shape. Use your punch with the hammer and hit it at 7:00 and you will see the rest of the pipe seperating from the bushing and you can use a pliers or needle nose to remove whats left. An additional tip is to shove a rag down the pipe before getting started to keep from loosing things and also to cut the ragged gal pipe that is petruding from the bushing so that it is flat wth the top of the bushing.


        That's some old school advice for a RookiePlumber.....

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        • #5
          Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

          I hope "pwelash130" get this problem solved. This is the second forum I have seen his post on in the last twenty minutes. Nothing wrong with more than one opinion. David

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          • #6
            Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

            I had used the cut out technique several times until I remembered that I had a 3/4" socket set with sockets to 4". Since then have always used them. But I have had to use a piano tuner (cheater bar) a couple of times.
            Charles

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            • #7
              Re: Cast Iron T Connection Problem

              Originally posted by rookie plumber View Post
              Piece of cake.
              Use a "mini hacker" (a hack saw blade in a handle or in a desperate situation wrap some tape around a hacksaw blade) If you have room for a sawzall this will also work. Make two vertical cuts into the damaged pipe that looks like it is twisted in the bushing. Do not cut too deep or you will damage the threads. I normally make my cuts pretty close together 4:00 6:00. Then I use a hammer and a punch to knock out my cut. You will then see that the threads inside the bushing are in great shape. Use your punch with the hammer and hit it at 7:00 and you will see the rest of the pipe seperating from the bushing and you can use a pliers or needle nose to remove whats left. An additional tip is to shove a rag down the pipe before getting started to keep from loosing things and also to cut the ragged gal pipe that is petruding from the bushing so that it is flat wth the top of the bushing.

              That's what I was going to suggest. Or an internal wrench/two pairs of channel locks (one going into the pipe handles first, and one turning the other pair.) This would probably be common as if you are not a plumber (or even if you are) you might not own an internal wrench. Theres a pic of one on this website if you want to see one.

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