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  • Pulley reduction?

    Is there a table or chart relating to pulley reduction or increase?

    Example: If you have a 5 inch pulley turning 1000rpm belted to a 7 inch pulley, how could you find the rpm of the 7 inch pulley?

    Might be simple for some, but I haven't learned it yet.

    Thanks for any help.

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Pulley reduction?

    Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
    Is there a table or chart relating to pulley reduction or increase?

    Example: If you have a 5 inch pulley turning 1000rpm belted to a 7 inch pulley, how could you find the rpm of the 7 inch pulley?

    Might be simple for some, but I haven't learned it yet.

    Thanks for any help.

    J.C.
    Second link is very simple.
    http://www.csgnetwork.com/pulleybeltcalc.html

    http://www.culvermotor.com/Engineeri...alculator.html

    The answer is the 7" pully will be spinning at 714.29 RPMS
    Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
    A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
    Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
    Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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    • #3
      Re: Pulley reduction?

      Thanks!

      J.C.

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      • #4
        Re: Pulley reduction?

        Yup, the speed is inversely related to the diameter. So in your example, you multiply the 1000 rpm of the 5" pulley by 5/7. Which gives you the number sewerratz cites.

        It's also sometimes useful to note that the TORQUE output of the slower spinning shaft increases by about the same proportion. In other words, the torque provided by the 7" pulley would be slightly less than 7/5 of the torque delivered by the faster-spinning shaft. The reason it's not exactly 7/5 as much torque is because there is always some loss - no energy exchange is ever 100% efficient.

        Power, which is torque times rpm (multiplied by some constants depending on what system of units you're using) is nearly identical for both shafts... but not exactly. Again, the driven pulley will always deliver a little less than the driving pulley puts out, again because of the necessary tax imposed by less than 100% efficiency.

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