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  • Basement wallhung toilet question

    Hello everyone. I am new member here and by seeing the response to the other threads, I am confident that I will get my question answered.
    Well to begin with, we have a bathroom in the basement which is connected to a sewage ejector and then to the main sewer. We had to open the ejector pit 2 times after we bought the house (once to change the float and the other time the float got stuck). Now that we are renovating the basement bathroom, I would at least like the toilet to drain to the main 4" sewer directly. I don't mind having the shower drain going to the ejector.
    The main drain line is running just above the basement floor. (See picture A). I would like to put a Y connection on this and use it for the drain for a wall hung toilet.
    (see picture B).
    My question is
    A) Is it possible to do this:?
    B) Is the height (3" to 4") from the main drain enough for the toilet to work properly?

    I was going to use one of the wall hung toilet and Grohe inwall Carrier



    http://www.irawoods.com/core/media/media.nl?id=156324&c=528529&h=7b2a12c77d584a9c2a1e
    and
    http://www.irawoods.com/Toto-CT418FG...nagloss-Cotton


    Please give your valuable comments.
    Thanks in advance!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Sonijp; 02-10-2010, 06:56 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

    Hmmm.....I am surprised...No one replied! May be I was too optimistic

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

      I would be sure that the wall carrier will rough in at the height that your wye fitting will be at,I can't see a min./max height on the man. cut sheet that you gave a link to.The whole system is a little pricey but it's probably cheaper than a commercial set up.
      Last edited by leakfree; 02-10-2010, 09:43 PM.
      Steve in the trade since 73 doing new residential/Commercial work

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

        says 15"-19", pic shows 12", looks like it'll fit, but your proposed setup is not vented properly I think (question for the plumbers, not the drain cleaners) and I dont like the discharge going out on a 45 (but again, I'm a drain cleaner). really should be a wye, then a 45 to vertical, then a san-t at the toilet outlet, then take the top of the t up to a vent. but get a plumbers opinion.
        This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

          Not taking where your walls are going to be located into consideration, you can do the following.

          You can place the wye in the horizontal line on its side. Then you install a 3x2 san tee, or 4x2 san tee (depending on which size you're running) on it's back with the 2" opening facing up. The location of the installation will be between the carrier and the wye. The two inch is the vent. Then you run the horizontal line to the carrier.

          Good idea, if you can get the toilet to run gravity, so much the better. You should also be able to get the lavatory to run gravity.
          Time flies like an arrow.

          Fruit flies like a banana.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

            http://www.geberit.us/CompleteDrawin...1-255-00-1.pdf


            In order to have the rim of the toilet finish at 16" you need the drain to be 9" above finished floor. You can go a little higher depending on who will be using the toilet. If children or other short persons will be using the toilet you don't want to go above 16"

            If only adults/ tall persons will be using it you wouldn't want to go above 18" off finished floor, which puts the drain center at 11" above finished floor.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

              I would recommend checking your local plumbing code. I have no idea what NYC or NY state code says, but in IL, most towns require basement bathrooms to go into ejector pits. If your home ever gets water backup from the city main (very common in heavy rainstorms with combined city sanitary and storm sewers) you may end up with water in your basement. Probably not going to happen if the rough in off the floor is 17" though. Just something to consider if you don't plan to stay in the house for a long time.

              Usually (not every time) where there is an ejector pump, there is a (good) reason that the pump was used and not gravity.


              I would think that it would be cheaper to invest in a better pump. Perhaps one with a different type of switch.

              Just playing the devil's advocate.

              Hope it all works out.

              -Chris

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

                Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
                Not taking where your walls are going to be located into consideration, you can do the following.

                You can place the wye in the horizontal line on its side. Then you install a 3x2 san tee, or 4x2 san tee (depending on which size you're running) on it's back with the 2" opening facing up. The location of the installation will be between the carrier and the wye. The two inch is the vent. Then you run the horizontal line to the carrier.

                Good idea, if you can get the toilet to run gravity, so much the better. You should also be able to get the lavatory to run gravity.
                I think I will be able to provide with a 2" vent on to the setup.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

                  Originally posted by Swade Plumbing View Post
                  I would recommend checking your local plumbing code. I have no idea what NYC or NY state code says, but in IL, most towns require basement bathrooms to go into ejector pits. If your home ever gets water backup from the city main (very common in heavy rainstorms with combined city sanitary and storm sewers) you may end up with water in your basement. Probably not going to happen if the rough in off the floor is 17" though. Just something to consider if you don't plan to stay in the house for a long time.

                  Usually (not every time) where there is an ejector pump, there is a (good) reason that the pump was used and not gravity.


                  I would think that it would be cheaper to invest in a better pump. Perhaps one with a different type of switch.

                  Just playing the devil's advocate.

                  Hope it all works out.

                  -Chris
                  @Swade Plumbing:
                  I thought they had put the ejector pit in the house because, nobody must have thought about a rear drain toilet and moreover the stand-up shower would need to be drained to the ejector (sewer runs just above the basement floor).
                  Now you made me think about the chances of sewage backing up through the wallhung toilet? How will I know if this could happen?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

                    "Overhead" sewers (sewer runs above the basement floor and any basement drains go into a pit with pump) are pretty standard these days in most areas.

                    You may not know if you are prone to main sewer back ups until you experience one.

                    This is a scenario that is not very easily explained in a forum setting, but I'll try to give you some basic advice.

                    A relatively easy first step is to find out if your city has combined sanitary and storm sewers. You can probably confirm this with the public works department (or sewer department specifically). Combined sewers mean that both the sanitary waste water from homes and the storm water from the streets (and homes) use the same piping system. In combined systems, it is possible for the sewer to become overwhelmed by severe rainfall and become "charged". When this happens, the water travels the path of least resistance into the lateral lines to houses and in some cases overflows into the home's basement. This is a commonplace event in Chicago. I am not familiar with New York. Usually houses with deep basements and sewers are the most susceptible to this problem.

                    Also, check with your neighbors and find out if any of them have ever had sewer backups, water in the basement or sewer problems in general. This is good knowledge to have anyway.

                    Are you in NYC itself or a suburb? If you're in NYC, contacting the public works department may be a lost cause.

                    Suburbs and smaller towns are easier to get info from.


                    Or, you may want to consider paying a professional plumbing contractor for some advice and guidance (an hour of their time) to keep you on the right track and prevent problems down the road.

                    Or, you could just save yourself some headache and not gamble with your home (even if it's a low risk) and continue to use the ejector pit for the toilet discharge.

                    Personally, I would just invest in a higher quality pump (NOT A home center "off the shelf" PUMP) and you should see fewer problems.

                    Most of the ejector pump calls I get are from misuse of the toilet (flushing things that shouldn't be flushed) or from mechanical failure of an inferior quality pump.

                    Our company has done countless basement bathrooms. All have utilized an ejector pit/pump for the toilet.

                    A high quality Zoeller or Hydromatic submersible ejector pump should last for years (up to about 10 depending on the amount of use).

                    My customers that want serious quality invest in better pumps like the ones shown in this website.

                    I have customers with Tramco ejector pumps that are 30 years old and still going strong.

                    http://tramcopump.com/


                    The bottom line is that quality is proportional to cost.

                    Just remember that whatever you decide, your home is usually your biggest asset and investment.

                    Sorry this is long!!!

                    -Chris
                    Last edited by Swade Plumbing; 02-15-2010, 10:16 AM. Reason: add link for tramco pump co. (true professional quality industrial grade pumps)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

                      Finally I completed the project. I put a wall hung TOTO toilet on a Geberit Carrier. I have attached some pictures.
                      Thanks for all the suggestions and support.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Basement wallhung toilet question

                        its not a impossible task to do but by the looks of it I would have to hire a plumber to do it for me because im not the type of handyman. I would hire a plumber there not that expensive if you think about it . But if your up for a challenge i encouraged you.

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