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shower valve question...

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  • shower valve question...

    I just purchased a price pfister 1 handle shower fixture to replace my badly leaking 3 handle setup.

    The valve assembly has 4 threaded connections(internal threads) that go to t he shower head, spout and hot and cold inputs.

    I thought all connections had to be soldered. Just wondering if someone could point me in the right direction about what kind of connection I need. The pipes in the wall are fixed so I dont see how I can screw a connector to the valve in this situation.

    DOes it take some sort of connector that screws in and then gets soldered/

    many thanks

  • #2
    Re: shower valve question...

    If you are going to pipe copper to the valve you will need male adapters to make the connections. Basically you solder a small piece of pipe into a male adapter screw into the valve and then pipe it back to your hot and cold supply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: shower valve question...

      Some might steer you towards a Sharkbite fitting, but I didn't say it!
      Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: shower valve question...

        I just came back from HD and saw the sharktite connectors and the copper connectors with a male end and a short solder-able end.

        i dont understand why thread in something that ultimately needs soldering when you can just solder directly?

        Are the shark tite connectors reliable?

        thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: shower valve question...

          Some shower valves have a male adapter cast as the ports but also may allow copper to be sweated directly into the valve.

          If your valve has female threads at the ports then you'll need male adapters as you cannot directly sweat copper to the valve.

          Or call a plumber. I call electricians all the time.

          J.C.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: shower valve question...

            i call electricians all the time. me, too. one reason for the threaded ports is that you can use cpvc or galvanized pipe. any thing that has threads. breid......................

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: shower valve question...

              Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
              Some shower valves have a male adapter cast as the ports but also may allow copper to be sweated directly into the valve.

              If your valve has female threads at the ports then you'll need male adapters as you cannot directly sweat copper to the valve.

              Or call a plumber. I call electricians all the time.

              J.C.

              It is even possible to solder the male adapters into the valve body with the cartridge removed.
              Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: shower valve question...

                thats actually a great idea... soldering the threaded male connector is the best of both worlds I guess.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: shower valve question...

                  Your best bet is to return the IPS valve and go buy a sweat valve.

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: shower valve question...

                    pp sells the copper sweat 1/2 union tailpiece. but i don't think they ever had a sweat 3 handle valve for the tub and shower connection.

                    you're much better off using the male adapters as this will give you the most versatility and adjustment. the valve should have a built in union and will allow for adjustment.

                    we're talking 4- 1/2'' mip x c adapters at $1.00 each. done deal. plus you'll need 2- 1/2'' dog ear 90's fip x c @ $4.50 each.

                    the threaded adapters will also give you a final adjustment when you find out you didn't solder it square to the wall

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: shower valve question...

                      Originally posted by Devine Plumbing View Post
                      It is even possible to solder the male adapters into the valve body with the cartridge removed.

                      Probably not an approved connection, but works great where there is little room to work and when the customer insists on a certain faucet as long as the male adapters are only hand tight.
                      Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: shower valve question...

                        I tried my hand at soldering the male connector to the valve body, I tried cleaning both surfaces with a brush, applied the flux and started to heat the valve body with a propane torch. when the flux started dripping out I touched the solder to the connection and nothing happened.

                        I think it will take a lot of time for the sheer mass of the valve body to heat up enough to melt solder that it will melt the flux away.

                        Is there a better way to accomplish this? I might just have to resort to using teflon.... which I guess would work also.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: shower valve question...

                          Oh my god call a plumber!

                          J.C.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: shower valve question...

                            Originally posted by adroga View Post
                            I tried my hand at soldering the male connector to the valve body, I tried cleaning both surfaces with a brush, applied the flux and started to heat the valve body with a propane torch. when the flux started dripping out I touched the solder to the connection and nothing happened.

                            I think it will take a lot of time for the sheer mass of the valve body to heat up enough to melt solder that it will melt the flux away.

                            Is there a better way to accomplish this? I might just have to resort to using teflon.... which I guess would work also.
                            It sounds like you are over your head but here goes. You CANNOT solder the MIP X C adapters into the valve as they are not meant for that. If you have already tried it without first disassembling the entire valve you probably need all new parts inside of the valve. If you insist on using the wrong valve you would be better off sweating the MIP X C adapters to short pieces of copper before you screw them in to your valve. After the valve is set where it belongs, you only need to work with copper to copper which may be easier for you. Make 100% certain your setbacks are 100% correct or you will be tearing the wall open after you thought you were done.

                            Good luck - Mark
                            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: shower valve question...

                              I dissasembled the cartridge inserts before attempting to solder.

                              I was given a tip to try soldering it in and it seemed like a good idea until I tried it.

                              I appreciate the help, but will resort to soldering the rest of the connections and using tape for the threaded connector.

                              Guess I am over my head, because I have never done it before.. well I was just asking for advice and havent taken anything apart so no damage done.

                              I guess no one has ever tried to do something by themselves in this forum right?

                              PS thanks for the advice to utahnow.. that was the plan after 1 attempt at soldering the threaded connectors... hope I dont sound too sarcastic I was only joking..

                              Comment

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