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  • Air/LPG

    G'day all.

    I've just found the forum and joined up. Lots of good information and stories about.

    I wonder if anyone could answer a question I have.

    I stopped using oxy/acetylene a while ago, due to the extortionate rental prices on the bottles. I have been using Mapp gas for the last year or so, and have been happy with it. I renovate bathrooms for a living, so I am only brazing 15mm copper.I find that using two bottles together normally welds brass spuds happily, and even pipes in a low situation where they may be holding a bit of water. BUT, due to the size of the bottles, I am finding it to be not too economical.

    I have been thinking that it would be more economical to use an air/LPG mixture instead. I did used to work with a guy a few years ago who had and air/acetylene set up that worked very well, but that would be back to renting bottles again???

    Does anybody know if there is such a thing as an air/LPG kit available? I have enquired at BOC and at Reece, and not managed to get anywhere.

  • #2
    Re: Air/LPG

    Sorry guys, I thought this was an Australian forum.

    Only just realised that the majority of you are Americans. I do believe that you soft solder your copper pipes and wouldn't have the need for oxy/acetylene???

    Still, if anybody could answer my question, I would be most grateful.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Air/LPG

      For copper brazing the size you stated, air/lpg just won't get it hot enough without a monster size weed burner tip that cant be easily pin pointed on the joint, the heat goes everywhere burning anything close by. If you are doing any work in the wind, it gets worse. An air/acetylene Turbotorch with proper size tip and a B size bottle setup will work well for your application and thats what I would reccommend. Here we buy the bottles so no rental fee and they just exchange them for full at the welders supply.
      Last edited by plumb4life; 05-04-2010, 01:45 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Air/LPG

        We do have a few posters from outside of the U.S. who might have some info regarding localish suppliers for you. But here if i'm going to be doing a lot of soldering I'll get a B tank, Lenox makes the caddy and torch I use.
        No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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        • #5
          Re: Air/LPG

          Thanks for the replies fellas. I've decided that I'll just stick to Mapp gas canisters.

          I did make some enquiries over here, but as plumb4life quite rightly pointed out, it wouldn't burn hot enough for silver solder.

          I just thought that i could get a 9kg cylinder of LPG for the same price as a Mapp gas canister...........but...........oh well.....never mind

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          • #6
            Re: Air/LPG

            Up here, what you call LPG is I suppose what we call propane. Propane torches are common. The little bottles you purchase are blue, where the MAP-Pro is yellow. Propane is suitable only for soft solder process. Not hot enough for silver brazing. Air/acetylene is commonly used also for soldering, and oxy/acetylens is the common set up for silver brazing.

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            • #7
              Re: Air/LPG

              we call it propane, also. lpg is not 100% prop. anything from 90%/10% down to whatever. google "lpg". breid..............

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              • #8
                Re: Air/LPG

                Air/LPG will never get hot enough...but oxy/LPG will get to about 2500F. You will still need to rend an O2 tank.

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                • #9
                  Re: Air/LPG

                  Propane is a three-carbon alkane, normally a gas, but compressible to a transportable liquid. It is derived from other petroleum products during oil or natural gas processing. It is commonly used as a fuel for engines, oxy-gas torches, barbecues, portable stoves and residential central heating.
                  When used as vehicle fuel, it is commonly known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP gas), which can be a mixture of propane along with small amounts of propylene, butane, and butylene. An odorant such as ethanethiol or thiophene is added so that people can easily smell the gas in case of a leak.

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