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Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

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  • Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

    Sometimes it takes 10 seconds or more for water to arrive and start pouring into the glass.
    Air can be heard gurgling until the water arrives.

    Where is the water remaining in the line, going?

    As soon as I stop pressing the rubber pad, the water stops.
    No water continuing to drain into the glass.

    Any ideas why the line fills with air?
    No water in the bottom of the refrigerator, either.

    It is likely time to change the screw-in filter.
    But I do not understand if/why that would make any difference.

    Thank you.

    Robert
    Last edited by Robert Gift; 07-26-2011, 11:08 PM.
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

  • #2
    Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

    I am not an expert...but I would check to see if you have a small break in your water line just beyond the dual water inlet valve.

    Check the back of your fridge. You will see the main water supply line (coming from your basement or cabinet) connected directly to the water inlet valve. When your icemaker calls for water, this valve opens and water enters the line. The same thing happens when you put your glass up for water, the valve opens and fills your glass.

    If you have a small leak in the line leading to your drinking water, the water hose would empty out slowly, leaving only air in the line.

    So, you ask, what is happening to the water that is leaking out of the hose? It is not on the floor. That is because the water inlet valve is located just above the condensate pan. Which is designed to hold a lot of water, and your condensor fan is designed to dry up the pan, so you never see the water.

    Pull the the water inlet valve. Check the hose. Hopefully that will solve your problem.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

      Thank you, caca.
      Interesting!
      It's 3:55 a.m..I'll go look when I won't disturb anyone.
      I never saw water on the floor but if that condensation collection pan is big enough, it could be there.
      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

        I checked and no water anywhere, not even in the evaporation pan.

        The ice-maker at the top of the freezer is well above the door dispenser outlet, so water is not draining there.
        I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
        It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
        "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

          I second Caca...The lines hold so little water that it can evaporate quickly.

          10 seconds sounds a bit extreme though. Do you have a leak in the main supply tap going to the fridge? For what you are describing it would have to be a big leak and constantly flowing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

            Originally posted by Kevin Jones View Post
            I second Caca...The lines hold so little water that it can evaporate quickly.

            10 seconds sounds a bit extreme though. Do you have a leak in the main supply tap going to the fridge? For what you are describing it would have to be a big leak and constantly flowing.
            The plastic line appears to be 3/16" ID (Maybe 1/8 inch.)

            No leaks anywhere that I have found
            Electric valve sounds low on the refrigerator.
            By the time the water arrives, it is not very cold because it has been in the line in the OUTSIDE part of the freezer door to keep it from freezing.

            I'll do some timing and use a measuring cup to see how much water dispenses before the cold water arrives.
            The plastic tube is coiled in the lower right back of the non freezer section.
            I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
            It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
            "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

              Originally posted by cacaparrot View Post
              I am not an expert...but I would check to see if you have a small break in your water line just beyond the dual water inlet valve.

              Check the back of your fridge. You will see the main water supply line (coming from your basement or cabinet) connected directly to the water inlet valve. When your icemaker calls for water, this valve opens and water enters the line. The same thing happens when you put your glass up for water, the valve opens and fills your glass.

              If you have a small leak in the line leading to your drinking water, the water hose would empty out slowly, leaving only air in the line.

              So, you ask, what is happening to the water that is leaking out of the hose? It is not on the floor. That is because the water inlet valve is located just above the condensate pan. Which is designed to hold a lot of water, and your condensor fan is designed to dry up the pan, so you never see the water.

              Pull the the water inlet valve. Check the hose. Hopefully that will solve your problem.
              YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT!
              That was it!
              The water slowly leaking out was being absorbed by the insulation and also dripping on the floor and evaporating.
              We never saw any of it.
              GE stupidly ran the line in a protective sleeve right againsthe hot compressor.
              The heat caused the plastic tube to become brittle and it cracked.

              How do I fix it?
              Thank you, caca.
              Last edited by Robert Gift; 07-27-2011, 06:08 AM.
              I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
              It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
              "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

                Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                How do I fix it?
                Thank you, caca.
                Call GE (or whoever) and complain! If the fridge is not a million years old it might be covered by the MFG warranty still. Otherwise if you can get at it, some adapters and some copper tubing from Home Depot will get you where you need to go.
                We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Why air in chilled water line? GE refrigerator

                  Originally posted by masterbeavis View Post
                  Call GE (or whoever) and complain! If the fridge is not a million years old it might be covered by the MFG warranty still. Otherwise if you can get at it, some adapters and some copper tubing from Home Depot will get you where you need to go.
                  TPX30PBDABB is now 11 years old.
                  A year ago I had called the GE 800 help line but the woman had no idea.
                  By now I bet this has happened MANY times to this model refrigerator. I would expect GE to have a service bulletin abouthis, but of course the help line was unaware of it.

                  Stopped at Home Depot and they sold me 1/4-inch O.D. plastic tubing and connectors.
                  It is 1/4-inch I.D. so I'll have to get something a little bigger.
                  The tube holds little pressure - justhe weight of water to the dispenser.
                  A section of "corrugated" flexible tubing which is 5/8s-inch I.D. slides snugly over the old tubing.
                  If not dirty, I would silicone glue it in place over the old tubing. (But I use thatube to vacuum lint from the coils athe back - nothing else can reach and fit between the coils - brilliant engineering GE!).

                  Will be nice not to wait 11-seconds for water from the dispenser.
                  Last edited by Robert Gift; 07-27-2011, 06:49 AM.
                  I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                  It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                  "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                  Comment

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