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  • Re-plumbing questions

    My 50+ yr old house is developing plumbing problems. The house was originally a single-story poured concrete building over a full unfinished basement. I added a two story addition about 30 years ago. The original plumbing was a combination of 1/2” and ¾” galvanized pipe. The supply came in as ½” and then stepped up to ¾”. (Who knows why??) The addition was plumbed with ¾” soft copper, as was a gas water heater. The incoming water supply has been changed from ½” galvanized to ¾” soft copper as the result of changing the water meter. My washing machine supply which was added at the time of the two story addition is ½” copper (H & C). The reason for all of this detail is to elicit guidance in a replacement of as much of the original plumbing as possible. As I inspect the plumbing, I notice several joints where corrosion is obvious. Additionally, I have discovered at least two soldered fittings which have developed oozing. My plan is to educate myself and replace as much as possible with PEX. Although PEX is ideally installed with a manifold and homeruns to the various points of use, this is not practical in my old house. (The plumbing to the two bathrooms in the addition is not accessible, as it goes under a slab.)

    My thought is that if I just replace as much of the old plumbing as is accessible with ¾” PEX I should not have any problem in reduced water flow. Is this a reasonable assumption?

    Also, how would using PEX compare with replacing as stated above with CPVC (cost, reliability, water flow, etc.)?

    I checked my water pressure a few minutes ago. All three of my outside faucets are showing 130 lbs, even though one of the faucets is ahead of my pressure regulator. The regulator is original to the house, so I am not about to touch it till I am ready to replace it and the plumbing. My question is what is the usual suggested residential pressure?
    Last edited by thiggy; 05-19-2010, 11:26 AM. Reason: Additional question

  • #2
    Re: Re-plumbing questions

    YOUR HOUSE WATER PRESSURE "SHOULD" NEVER BE OVER 80 PSI MAX

    I WOULD GO WITH THE PEX TO REPIPE WITH

    JERRYMAC
    E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
    CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
    FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
    SINCE JAN. 1989

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    • #3
      Re: Re-plumbing questions

      130 is heavy.new prv set to 65 psi and copper for new potable you will save a lot of water.

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      • #4
        Re: Re-plumbing questions

        New pressure reducing valve for sure and put in a domestic expansion tank with it, if you don't have one by the water heater. PEX is the way to go without a doubt, and much less learning curve than attempting copper.
        My question is the sections that are poured in concrete are they still galvy? You may want to get a pro to make that happen...it's not going to be easy. Is the pipe sleeved in the concrete or has the concrete been eating at that pipe for the last 30 years?

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        • #5
          Re: Re-plumbing questions

          The plumbing under the slab is 3/4" copper. Where it enters the slab the copper is in an insulated sleeve. I don't know about what I can't see. I am comfortable sweating copper, but have no experience with PEX.

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